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Glass Video from Jan 23, 2014 - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Glass Video from Jan 23, 2014
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Salon, Authority and Twenty First Century Bullies - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Shutting Down the Core Curriculum - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Sad Tails with Happy Endings! - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Amity AstroTurf Referendum Results - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Amity AstroTurf Referendum Exit Poll - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
The Sheep and the Goats (with links) - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
The Unworthiness of Researchers.... - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"I look forward to your subsequent post. I think this discussion is beneficial in exploring some of the ethical issues around new technologies and we need much more discussions like this." - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"As a person working to bring innovation to health care, especially the patient relationship in primary care, I mostly agree with you. However, too often people make categorical comments like banning a technology, instead of saying that a clear case needs to be presented for it and seeking discourse about what the pros and cons of a new technology would be and then doing proper risk analysis." - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"MarylandMD - You are missing important context. Matt started his post on Facebook saying "Am I just turning into a technophobe?" If he had not used that phrase, I certainly wouldn't have used it, especially about Matt who strikes me as being, in most cases, very far from a 'technophobe'." - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"I think your reply brings up an interesting issue. At what point should surgeons be on the cutting edge (no pun intended)? When should they do research about new developments, either in medical technology, or even in commercial technology? This seems like more of an ethics question than a technology question. When should IRBs be involved? When should the FDA be involved? As technology, and culture starts changing more rapidly, are our institutions, like prepared for the change? If not, what needs to change in our institutions?" - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"As a technologist who wears Google Glass working at a Federally Qualified Health Center, I think you've just made a very good point why I believe physicians need to work with Glass. Unless they do, how Google Glass is used, similar to how EMRs are designed, will be determined by non-physicians." - Aldon Hynes
More About Glass and Healthcare - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"One last thought: it is worth looking at the Technology Adoption Life Cycle, as written about back in the 50's, particularly by Everett Rogers in his book Diffusion of Innovations. See Wikipedia for a good introduction: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T... Google Glass is at the very front end of the adoption lifecycle, where only a few innovators have been using it. As has become more and more common these days, when a new innovation comes along, it often gets a backlash. It seems that the backlash against an innovation is proportional to potential disruption the innovation carries." - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"The other point that I would make is that Google Glass is not in BETA. Ity is not even in ALPHA. It is still a prototype. I think it is premature to make determinations about what a prototype is likely to do to a business. You might want to go back and look at the history of the Xerox. The Smithsonian Article is a good starting point: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/... Copies turned down the xerox machine because so few people made copies prior to it, they didn't think it would sell. My experience with Glass, so far, is similar to my experiences with the Apple Newton in the early 90s. A lot of people didn't think much of the Newton back then, and it never really took off, but it laid the groundwork for smartphones today. I wouldn't be surprised to see Glass follow a similar path and in twenty years be an all but forgotten precursor to ubiquitous wearable computing." - Aldon Hynes
Re: Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous - http://www.kevinmd.com/blog...
"Here is the comment I left on Matt's Facebook page: As a person who has been using Google Glass for the past three months in a health care setting, I believe you have become a technophobe. Privacy Violations: The same issue applies to cellphones. Are you going to ban them from your practice? Hackable: Personal computers are hackable as well. Ban them? (I worked with security for a Swiss bank two decades ago when they said they'd never connect to the Internet because of security issues. There are risks with all technology, just like everything else in life. You can't ban life, instead, you need to mediate risks) Concern with multitasking: This is probably the strongest point, which also seems pretty weak, based on my experience with Google Glass. Yet the interruptions I get from Google Glass, wearing it all the time, is similar to the interruptions I get from phone calls, overhead pages, and other staff members knocking on my door. Google’s And medicine’s goals aren’t aligned: Again,..." - Aldon Hynes
Players That Suit Ingrees, Update - http://www.orient-lodge.com/node...
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