Sign in or Join FriendFeed
FriendFeed is the easiest way to share online. Learn more »

Ric Hayman › Comments

Ric Hayman
Re: CotéIndustries.com - http://coteindustries.com/post...
"Michael - try Freemind. I've been using it for a while … http://freemind.sourceforge.ne..." - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
The secret to creativity, intelligence and scientific thinking: Being able to make connections - The Buffer Blog - https://blog.bufferapp.com/connect...
A riff on the “everything is connected” idea, that creativity is “combinatorial” and we all stand “on the shoulders of giants”. Indirectly it points to the value of networks over hierarchies, since networks are multi-directional, and weak ties in networks expose us to more things we can combine in creating. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
America's Economy Is Officially Inside-Out - http://blogs.hbr.org/2013...
“But when growth rises and living standards fall? That begins to hint that there is something wrong—very wrong, perhaps terribly wrong—with the way things are.  It suggest that what is happening to this society is not merely a simple, passing, self-healing ailment; but a chronic, possibly permanent, definitely debilitating condition. Not a flu—but a cancer.” As always, Haque's language is quite forceful, but it doesn't invalidate the points he makes … that this may not be part of a familiar economic cycle that will ultimately right itself, but be a permanent change to our economy. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Hierarchies were a solution to a communications problem - http://blog.changeagentsworldwide.com/hierarc...
“The high-value work today is in facing complexity, not in addressing problems that have already been solved and for which a formulaic or standardized response has been developed. One challenge for organizations is getting people to realize that what they already know has increasingly diminishing value.” … the ability to learn new things (where networks are very useful) is, for a lot of work, of much greater value than existing knowledge. Knowledge is power no more. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Entrepreneurs or the state: Innovation comes from public investment. - http://www.slate.com/article...
This is one reason that disinvestment in research & development by the Australian government is a bad thing. Contrary to popular belief, most innovation comes off the public dollar rather than the widely-lauded tech entrepreneurs we hear so much about. Now, commercialising innovation is an extremely useful and necessary step … but we should recognise where the ideas come from, so we don't kill the golden goose by mistake. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Free International Roaming With A Premium Upsell - http://avc.com/2014...
"Recently adjusted my plan (with Vodafone in Australia) which allows me to use my (domestic) plan data overseas for a $5 charge per 24 hr period I use it (i.e. if I never use it, I don't get charged; if I start using it at 1pm, I'm charged $5 which lasts until 1pm tomorrow). It also includes my call/text plan quotas as well, and since I have 6.5GB data + $700 calls/texts this was an attractive option, especially when compared to the $1/MB for international data I would have been charged otherwise. So for the 9 days I was in Indonesia and Singapore my maximum extra charge was $45, rather than ~$500 (based on data usage and calls made), without looking for a local SIM or changing my number … was pretty happy with that :)" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
How politics makes us stupid - http://www.vox.com/2014...
This is why more facts and better logic aren't as persuasive as they should be; our ideology actually prevents our brain from working properly … “As a way of avoiding dissonance and estrangement from valued groups, individuals subconsciously resist factual information that threatens their defining values”. Doesn't augur well for a world that needs to come to its senses. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: The Cost of Letting Your Social Presence Slide - http://www.brasstackthinking.com/2014...
"Never left … I'll stick around :)" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Bringing order to complexity - http://bridging-the-gap.me/2013...
Paradoxically, “simple” is hard, and “complicated” is easy. We often end up with complicated business processes not because they are dealing with a complex problem, but because we haven't taken enough time to design them properly. Design thinking, particularly human-centred design, is offered as an approach that applies multiple perspectives to the problem to understand the implications (upstream and down) of any changes made. One key suggestion: separation of process steps from the business rules being applied, which increases the re-useability of both. This also is the stuff of business architecture … - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Why Meetings Are Often Ineffective - http://www.psfk.com/2013...
Meetings have (quite rightly) garnered a bad reputation over time, mainly because they are used for the wrong reasons most of the time. Have you ever wondered why we often only schedule interruptions to our work, not the work itself? In this post, Johnnie Moore describes meetings as “action theatre” and “commitment ceremonies” where “we sit for too long, arguing with what we think is great cleverness when in fact our rational brain is already worn out and running on empty”. Fortunately he also has a couple of ideas about how we can make them better and more effective. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Business Models in Business Architecture - http://blogs.msdn.com/b...
A very useful attempt from Nick Malik to describe the distinctions between business DNA (values, mission, etc.), business strategy, business models and business capabilities … as well as the relationships between them. Of particular value is the recognition that enterprises that are non-trivial in scale will often have multiple business models, each with its own strategy; and that these strategies may not co-exist happily. This is a problem when senior people don't understand the interactions between business models and their related strategies, because it leads to turf wars, confused prioritisation and no idea what capabilities could be shared. This is the stuff of business architecture … - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Party politics is slowly dying. So what will take its place? - http://www.theguardian.com/politic...
While the locale for this piece is the UK, Australia's major political parties should take note, as the symptoms are similar here. We can recognise thoughts like “ … describes a draining away of authority from the main western parties, which, since the end of the cold war, have become increasingly bland: dangerously similar when it comes to ideology, and incorrigibly controlling” and “The mainstream politicians have forgotten that they are here to represent, not govern … We're sick of being lied to”. The article describes the rise of single-issue movements, something increasingly echoed here in Australia. If the major parties seek a return to relevance, perhaps they should pay more attention to what issues people engage with, and “represent” rather than “govern”. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
A Corporate Coup in Disguise | Alternet - http://www.alternet.org/corpora...
Despite some raucous objections in the small, the TPP hasn't hit the public's consciousness to any great extent. This is partly due the excessive secrecy that cloaks its discussions, but also to the seeming lack of interest from the general public. This article, although slanted to the US, suggests there's a number of reasons we should be paying attention, and why we shouldn't let it happen … - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: SA election: Entering the great unknown - http://indaily.com.au/news...
"Libs polled really well in safe Liberal seats (so no effect on seats won); they had a reasonable swing to them in safe Labor seats (again, no effect on seats won), but didn't get much more support in all the extra seats they could have won. The statewide percentage 2pp just reflects that safe Lib seats are VERY safe, but that getting even more votes in those seats (which affect the total %) doesn't get any extra seats." - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: SA election: Entering the great unknown - http://m.indaily.com.au/news...
"Libs polled really well in safe Liberal seats (so no effect on seats won); they had a reasonable swing to them in safe Labor seats (again, no effect on seats won), but didn't get much more support in all the extra seats they could have won. The statewide percentage 2pp just reflects that safe Lib seats are VERY safe, but that getting even more votes in those seats (which affect the total %) doesn't get any extra seats." - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Campaign Diary: pencils, dog whistles and robots - http://indaily.com.au/news...
"Just on the Do Not Call point - I think you'll find the legislation specifically exempts two classes of caller: political parties (perhaps unfortunately); and companies you are already a customer of (e.g. your bank)" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Why Australia's Climate Crisis Matters to the World | Politics News | Rolling Stone - http://stoweboyd.com/post...
"The crazy thing: two and a half years later the situation is worse, and we're now governed by a political party of climate change deniers who have dismantled the carbon pricing system, reduced support for renewable energy, and support coal-mining. What hope has the rest of the world when the canary won't even listen to its own warning?" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Yes, I Just Posted That. - http://amberetcetera.com/2013...
"NOT that you need either my permission or blessing, but … be the you you need to be, not the you anyone else thinks you should be. If nothing else , it will keep you interesting :)" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Do Things that Don't Scale - http://paulgraham.com/ds.html
Technologist and venture capitalist Paul Graham with advice for start-ups (it IS his game, after all) … it's the stuff that can't be automated that makes a difference, so do that. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Henry Farrell – On post-democracy - http://www.aeonmagazine.com/living-...
“Post-democracy is strangling the old parties of the left. They have run out of options. Perhaps all that traditional social democracy can do, to adapt a grim joke made by Crouch in a different context, is to serve as a pall-bearer at its own funeral.” The dilemma facing centre-left parties the world over is one of irrelevance. This poses a problem for democracy in general, as meaningful social democracy withers. While the Australian Labor Party is not mentioned here, it is recognisable in the description … - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Stowe Boyd, DC Traffic Cameras - http://stoweboyd.com/post...
"Causation, or correlation? I suspect there are a few other contributing factors …" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Every Employee Should Work From Home - http://www.forbes.com/sites...
David Heinemeier Hansson: “[Face time is] far less important as a tool of getting things done. Managers vastly overestimate it’s efficiency because it’s their job to interrupt people. But everyone else knows that being pulled into endless meetings is toxic and makes progress harder.” Remote working is topic du jour, it seems … but it's true that the office isn't always where you get work done. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
How Google Is Using People Analytics to Completely Reinvent HR - http://www.tlnt.com/2013...
Not entirely surprising that Google takes a data-heavy approach to its HR - it IS after all its raison d'être. Will be interesting to see how it holds up over time, but I suspect that results are better than most subjective hiring decisions. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
“The Art Of Not Sucking” - http://gapingvoid.com/ns/
Hugh McLeod's recipe for a meaningful life? Learning how NOT to suck … this is the place to go for real advice on success - defining it as well as achieving it. You might recognise Hugh as the source of my favourite cartoons too … - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
The Dangerous Logic of the Bradley Manning Case - http://www.newrepublic.com/article...
The potentially far-reaching effects of the charges laid against Manning for his Wikileaks whistle-blowing represent a threat to some of the USA's constitutional freedoms, and arguably an Al Quaeda victory more substantially damaging than 9/11 - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Death To Core Competency: Lessons From Nike, Apple, Netflix | Fast Company - http://www.fastcompany.com/3005850...
“Sticking to the knitting” was the mantra; finding your key competency was essential to competing well … but is that too limiting? The Nike experience suggests that disrupting yourself is preferable to having disruption done to you: “You can't have a barrier or restriction to that core competency. If we constrain ourselves by a circle of competency, we'll do ourselves a disservice.” - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Commoditisation, modularisation and small bets … this is a long way from “IT as we know it”, but right where it should be (even if it DOES upset a few large vendors :) ) - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Re: Stowe Boyd, Turn And Face The Change - http://stoweboyd.com/post...
"No problem, but would you mind keeping the links to the GigaOm writing coming here - it is (as far as I can tell) impossible to subscribe just to YOUR posts there … don't mind going there to read them, but don't want to be inundated with ALL GigaOm posts :)" - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
How is social business like urban traffic? - http://pro.gigaom.com/blog...
Stowe Boyd again exploring the benefits of subsuming personal productivity to network productivity, drawing parallels with research into traffic management that indicates that forcing drivers to think more selflessly (and not seek the most personally efficient outcomes) actually improves traffic flow. So to, at work we may be collectively better-performed if we think less of our personal productivity and more of our network's. - Ric Hayman
Ric Hayman
Alain de Botton's 10 Commandments - for Atheists - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture...
Is religion required for morality? Atheists would contend not, and de Botton's list is a good start for developing /nurturing our morality independent of a belief in gods … “We are holding on to an unhelpfully sophisticated view of ourselves if we think we are above hearing well-placed, blunt and simply structured reminders about goodness. There is greater wisdom in accepting that we are in most situations clunking and rather simple machines, with only a few moving parts and in want of much the same firm, basic guidance as is naturally offered to children and domestic animals. ” - Ric Hayman
Other ways to read this feed:Feed readerFacebook