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Blogs about Science

Blogs about Science

Following blogs about science. *work in progress* Pls point us to missing blogs! An RSS or FaceBook on bottom of page.
Blogs about Science
Fantastically Wrong: Europe’s Insane History of Putting Animals on Trial and Executing Them - http://www.wired.com/2014...
This is Europe’s shameful and largely forgotten history of putting animal "criminals" on trial and either executing them or, for plagues of insects, ordering them to leave town not only by a certain day, but by an exact time. Such irrational barbarism is hard to fathom, but as early as 824 all the way up to the middle of the 18th century, animals were held to the same moral standards as humans, suffering the same capital punishments and even rotting in the same jails. The post Fantastically Wrong: Europe’s Insane History of Putting Animals on Trial and Executing Them appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Mendeley API Version 1 is Out! - http://blog.mendeley.com/develop...
It has been a long 12-month journey, and the path wasn’t always lined with rose petals and unicorns, but last week we did allow ourselves a small celebration as version 1 of the Mendeley API was released. The API team designed this from the ground up, working alongside other Mendeley and Elsevier teams as […]
Blogs about Science
Why our faith in cramming is mistaken - http://mindhacks.com/2014...
You may think you know your own mind, but when it comes to memory, research suggests that you don’t. If we’re trying to learn something, many of us study in ways that prevent the memories sticking. Fortunately, the same research also reveals how we can supercharge our learning. We’ve all had to face a tough […]
Blogs about Science
Environmental Earth Science News Roundup #2 - http://all-geo.org/highlya...
More linky goodness from Anne’s Environmental Earth Science class at Kent State University. View the story “Environmental Earth Science in the News Roundup #2″ on Storify
Blogs about Science
Hey, Excuse Me… Is This Guy Boring You? - http://blogs.plos.org/everyon...
The post Hey, Excuse Me… Is This Guy Boring You? appeared first on EveryONE.
Blogs about Science
The Future of Research Symposium:How Scientists are Trained - http://thenode.biologists.com/the-fut...
This is the first of four posts relating to the Future of Research symposium which was announced in a previous blog post. Each of these posts will discuss a topic that is the focus of a workshop at the Symposium. Even if you can’t attend, please tweet @FORsymp with suggestions, or follow us to respond […]
Blogs about Science
When real life becomes equations: Control of Epiblast and Primitive Endoderm specification during mouse preimplantation development. - http://thenode.biologists.com/when-re...
During mouse preimplantation development, the zygote divides and forms three distinct lineages: one embryonic called the Epiblast (Epi) and two extraembryonic called trophectoderm (TE) and Primitive Endoderm (PrE). The first cell fate decision occurs at the morula stage (from 16-cell to 32-cell) between TE and the Inner Cell Mass (ICM) and the second cell fate […]
Blogs about Science
How We Can Harvest Wind Power From Tiny Flapping Flags - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Researchers have created a small flag generator that harvests electricity by flapping in the breeze. The post How We Can Harvest Wind Power From Tiny Flapping Flags appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
In Development this week (Vol. 141, Issue 19) - http://thenode.biologists.com/in-deve...
Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Modelling fate decisions in the early mouse embryo In the early embryo, the first fate decision separates the trophectoderm from the inner cell mass (ICM). Subsequently, the ICM segregates into epiblast (Epi) and primitive endoderm (PrE), but how do cells decide which of these […]
Blogs about Science
Participants Needed: Standing desk edition - http://blogs.plos.org/obesity...
Exciting news – researchers at the University of PEI (myself included) are beginning a study on the impact of standing desks.  If you live in the Charlottetown area (or know someone who does) and work a desk job, we’d love …
Blogs about Science
‘Big Bang Signal’ Could All Be Dust - http://www.wired.com/2014...
There was little need, before, to know exactly how much dust peppers outer space, far from the plane of the Milky Way. Scientists understood that the dimly radiating grains aligned with our galaxy’s magnetic field and that the field’s twists and turns gave a subtle swirl to the dust glow. But those swirls were too […] The post ‘Big Bang Signal’ Could All Be Dust appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
What’s Up With That? Phantom Cellphone Vibrations - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Phantom cellphone vibrations are surprisingly common. What causes this strange phenomenon? The post What’s Up With That? Phantom Cellphone Vibrations appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Epistricted Trits - https://www.sunclipse.org/...
In quantum mechanics, we are always calculating probabilities. We get results like, “There is a 50% chance this radioactive nucleus will decay in the next hour.” Or, “We can be 30% confident that the detector at position X will register a photon.” But the nature and origin of quantum probabilities remains obscure. Could it be […]
Blogs about Science
2014 Is About to Become the Hottest Year on Record - http://www.wired.com/2014...
This story originally appeared in Slate and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The Earth’s oceans have never been this far beyond the bounds of normal. ERIC HOLTHAUS Eric Holthaus is a meteorologist who writes about weather and climate for Slate’s Future Tense. New data released Thursday by the National Oceanic […] The post 2014 Is About to Become the Hottest Year on Record appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Congrats September Advisor of the Month! - http://blog.mendeley.com/mendele...
Congratulations and Thank You to Yarimar Rosa Rodriguez, our September Advisor of the Month! Yari, an instructor in Clinical Psychology at University of Puerto Rico, answered our call last month encouraging more Mendeley presentations by scheduling half a dozen presentations over the next few months, including talks at a large conference. Wow!  She’s in for […]
Blogs about Science
How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature - http://www.wired.com/2014...
The Western Ghats in India rise like a wall between the Arabian Sea and the heart of the subcontinent to the east. The 1,000-mile-long chain of coastal mountains is dense with lush rainforest and grasslands, and each year, clouds bearing monsoon rains blow in from the southwest and break against the mountains’ flanks, unloading water […] The post How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Google Scholar Irregularities - https://www.sunclipse.org/...
Google Scholar is definitely missing citations to my papers. The cited-by results for arXiv:1401.7254 on Google Scholar and on INSPIRE are completely nonoverlapping. Google Scholar can tell that arXiv:1409.4708 cites arXiv:1110.3845 but not that it cites arXiv:1405.2390. Meanwhile, the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System catches both. This would be a really petty thing to complain about, […]
Blogs about Science
Adventures in the Sophomoric - https://www.sunclipse.org/...
Yesternight, I went memory-road-tripping through my blog archives. One of the things I realized, apart from how amazingly enthusiastic I was for the blogging form back in 2007, was how much I reviled my sophomore-year university physics classes. At the time, they were unpleasant; in retrospect, they were deleterious. The worst was the relativity class, […]
Blogs about Science
Problems with Bargh’s definition of unconscious - http://mindhacks.com/2014...
I have a new paper out in Frontiers in Psychology: The perspectival shift: how experiments on unconscious processing don’t justify the claims made for them. There has been ongoing consternation about the reliability of some psychology research, particularly studies which make claims about unconscious (social) priming. However, even if we assume that the empirical results […]
Blogs about Science
Getting Grant Funding for Your Startup - http://blog.mendeley.com/guest-b...
Jan Reichelt, Co-founder and President of Mendeley, talks about his experience of using grants from funding bodies such as EUREKA and the Technology Strategy Board to help grow the company. By: Elitsa Dermendzhiyska, Co-founder of Grant Central Is there such a thing as a free lunch when it comes to startup funding? That’s the question […]
Blogs about Science
Close-Up Aerial Photos of Africa’s Last Elephants - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Kate Brooks' aerial photos show the beauty of Africa's elephants, and the catastrophic extinction they face at the hands of poachers. The post Close-Up Aerial Photos of Africa’s Last Elephants appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Forget GMOs. The Future of Food Is Data—Mountains of It - http://www.wired.com/2014...
The tiny startup already has created a reasonable facsimile of chicken eggs---an imitation that's significantly cheaper, safer, and possibly healthier than the real thing. Now it's working to overhaul other foods in much the same way. The post Forget GMOs. The Future of Food Is Data—Mountains of It appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Absurd Creature of the Week: The Parasitic Worm That Turns Snails Into Disco Zombies - http://www.wired.com/2014...
This is Leucochloridium, a parasitic worm that invades a snail's eyestalks, where it pulsates to imitate a caterpillar. The worm then mind-controls its host out into the open for hungry birds to pluck its eyes out. In the bird’s guts the worm breeds, releasing its eggs in the bird’s feces, which are happily eaten up by another snail to complete the whole bizarre life cycle. The post Absurd Creature of the Week: The Parasitic Worm That Turns Snails Into Disco Zombies appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Science Graphic of the Week: An Algorithm That Decodes the Surface of the Earth - http://www.wired.com/2014...
A study published last week in the Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing describes an algorithm that can classify land cover types with minimal nudging from humans. The post Science Graphic of the Week: An Algorithm That Decodes the Surface of the Earth appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Boom! Earth’s Population Could Hit 12 Billion by 2100 - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Earth is fast becoming a more crowded place — and it may become more crowded than expected. According to a new projection of human population growth, there could very well be 12.3 billion people by century's end, up to two billion more than some estimates. The post Boom! Earth’s Population Could Hit 12 Billion by 2100 appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
A look at Mendeley Readership Statistics - http://blog.mendeley.com/academi...
By See Wah Cheng, Product Manager at Mendeley We live in an age where knowledge dissemination happens at an incredible speed, researchers are always looking for ways to evaluate new discovery. Mendeley’s vision has always been to accelerate research, and by crowdsourcing readership statistics, we provide a new way for you to look at the […]
Blogs about Science
The Great Fracking Forward: Why the World Needs China to Frack Even More - http://www.wired.com/2014...
China's coal addiction threatens the planet. But can it handle a natural gas revolution? The post The Great Fracking Forward: Why the World Needs China to Frack Even More appeared first on WIRED.
Blogs about Science
Multiscale Structure via Information Theory - https://www.sunclipse.org/...
We have scienced: B. Allen, B. C. Stacey and Y. Bar-Yam, “An Information-Theoretic Formalism for Multiscale Structure in Complex Systems” [arXiv:1409.4708]. We develop a general formalism for representing and understanding structure in complex systems. In our view, structure is the totality of relationships among a system’s components, and these relationships can be quantified using information […]
Blogs about Science
Dirac, Pauli and You - https://www.sunclipse.org/...
Here is Paul Dirac in October 1927: If we are honest — and scientists have to be — we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality. The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination. It is quite understandable why primitive people, who were […]
Blogs about Science
This Mortician Thinks You Should Spend More Time With Corpses - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Caitlin Doughty has been cutting pacemakers out of corpses, grinding human bones by hand, and loading bodies into cremation chambers for seven years. But the 30-year-old mortician doesn't want to keep all the fun to herself: She thinks the rest of us should get to have a little more face time with the deceased. The post This Mortician Thinks You Should Spend More Time With Corpses appeared first on WIRED.
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