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Tim O'Reilly › Comments

Tim O'Reilly
Re: Who Cares If Samsung Copied Apple? - http://blogs.hbr.org/cs...
"I agree with your basic point here, but your historical analogy for Apple stretches the facts pretty far. There are decades between Apple's near-death experience after Windows rather than the Mac dominated the windows and mouse paradigm, and their resurgence with Mac OS X, then the iPhone. But it's very true that Apple didn't lose out to Microsoft because of copying.  In fact, the original Mac interface was itself inspired by the Xerox Alto and other work at PARC.  That's the real disingenuous part of Apple's argument.  They copied from Xerox, and the Microsoft copied from them.  But in each case, it was execution (and business model) that made the difference." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"Evan - the fact that people build proprietary cloud services on top of open source is not news. I highlighted that fact a decade ago in my talks on "The Open Source Paradigm Shift." It's not only not news, it's the way things work. Open platforms always create new value that is captured by people who close the system down in some ways. But we're all better off from the dance. Roger's post is not open source "triumphalism" but a statement about how open source and proprietary, revolutionary and enterprise, have learned to coexist. There is plenty of room still for new open source innovation. The notion that if everything isn't open source, we've somehow failed is a bankrupt notion. My own thinking about open source has always been shaped more by the generosity of the Berkeley/MIT/Apache/Internet approach - here's our work, build on it however you will - than on the hyper-controlling approach of the GPL. There's no question in my mind which of those approaches has created more value for..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: The End of the World: The State vs. the Internet - http://eaves.ca/2012...
"A couple of points I want to inject into the online discussion (as I injected them into the real-world discussion at Foo Camp): 1. We can already see signs of the corporation as an actor of stature to match the nation-state in the fact that companies like Google and Facebook effectively have a "foreign policy" with regard to China. Google had a foreign policy with regard to the Egyptian revolution. I know at least some people in government who have remarked on this. Perhaps more importantly, it's useful to frame the current financial disorder as a kind of "war" between corporations (particularly hedge funds) and nation states. George Soros vs. the British pound was only a foretaste; since 2008, the destabilization of the Euro is a struggle between financial firms and nation states, with nation states trying to preserve their currency and banking system against those who would profit from destabilizing them. And you can certainly see the recent JP Morgan losses as a cyber war between..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: Letter to the DoJ about the collusion lawsuit and settlement - http://www.idealog.com/blog...
"Mike, I completely agree with your analysis. I'd actually go one further, and argue that Amazon's actions are keeping prices *higher* for consumers in many cases. Because Amazon discounts so heavily from list price (using the huge quantity discounts that they demand from publishers because of their near-monopoly position), the publishers keep their prices higher than they would in a world where the publisher was attempting to sell directly to consumers, and needed to find the market price. Right now, if a publisher looks to price books at the market clearing price (the optimum point on the demand curve), Amazon will undercut that price in order to get share, making the publisher look like they are overcharging whatever price they set. In short, we have a market where only one player gets to set the consumer price. Right now, Amazon is using "most favored nation" treatment for themselves to always have the lowest price, and right now this looks good for consumers. But will they still..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"I think you misconstrued my post. I wasn't arguing that technology kills jobs (although I do think that it kills some jobs, at the same time as it creates others), but that the relentless drive to squeeze labor costs out of business misses a major point: that those same businesses depend on consumers having the income to purchase their products. There's a kind of long-term madness in the pursuit of short-term advantage that is starting to bite Western economies in a big way. And much as I admire and support the craftsman, the entrepreneur, and the move up the skills ladder, I think you have to recognize that we are moving away from a culture where there were lots of well-paying jobs that were essentially repetitive (and hence easily automatable), and that to replace those jobs with something more creative will require a major retooling of the economy." - Tim O'Reilly
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Tim O'Reilly
Re: Productivity and Employment (and Technology): In the Jaws of the Snake - http://andrewmcafee.org/2012...
"I love the notion of portable internet-connected devices being used to add skill to currently low-skill jobs. I first noticed this in thinking about the way that the Apple Store swarms with clerks helping customers - and each of them is turbocharged with the phone as a cash register. Todd Park (now US CTO) clicked when I told him this and noted that Walgreens is exploring adding the equivalent of a genius bar for prescriptions and medications, and that he could imagine the Apple Store model being used to empower home health care aides to help manage outcomes (e.g. reminding elderly patients to take their meds.) I think there's a lot here. Another really interesting trend is our trend to user-generated entertainment, and bit by bit, new ways to monetize that. Etsy is invigorating a craft economy, YouTube, Kickstarter, and Amazon Kindle are enabling new kinds of self-financing of creative work. It's small stuff yet, but getting more interesting. And of course there's the maker movement,..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: NYT Features Chicago’s “Adopt-a-Sidewalk” - http://codeforamerica.org/2012...
"This is another fabulous demonstration of our unconventional adoption strategy for the apps we produce.  It's of course unconventional only for cities, since it's how open source projects have always been adopted, by pull rather than push.  And like traditional open source projects, it's often unpredictable which ones will be adopted, and where.  But it's clear that Adopt-a-Hydrant has legs.  Of course, now the challenge is seeing how it gets used by citizens.  But this is a great start.  I love the way CfA apps are bringing open source to cities.  Right now, we're doing it with little apps, but eventually, these things will add up to something bigger.  It's just the way the various Unix/Linux and Internet utilities eventually coalesced into something much larger and more impactful.Nice work, nice recognition!" - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: Be Good (Not Less Bad) - http://continuations.com/post...
"So interesting.  I did a version of my "Towards a Global Brain" last night, which ends with the slide "We've got one world. We've got to get it right."  In the Q&A, one of the questions brought back to mind Jay Winik's book, The Great Upheaval, which is a tale of three revolutions: The American, the French, and one at about the same time in Russia, which was brutally put down by Catherine the Great. They represent a nice spread on the possibilities.  If we truly make it new, as the American Revolution did, we have a bright future.  If we let the Revolution devolve into rivalries that grow ever more acrimonious, we get the French. And then there's always the possibility of the Old Guard intervening forcefully to keep the new from happening." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: Google to Launch Major New Social Network Called Circles, Possibly Today - http://www.disqus.com/people...
"Marshall - Sorry to appear to have confirmed your story. A while back, I saw some of the same research you refer to here, and when I saw Steve Case's tweet about a product being announced at SXSW, I thought "cool, they made it into a product." I hadn't clicked through to your story, and didn't realize it was just speculation." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: Google to Launch Major New Social Network Called Circles, Possibly Today (Updated) - http://www.readwriteweb.com/archive...
"Marshall - Sorry to appear to have confirmed your story. A while back, I saw some of the same research you refer to here, and when I saw Steve Case's tweet about a product being announced at SXSW, I thought "cool, they made it into a product." I hadn't clicked through to your story, and didn't realize it was just speculation." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"One-click is one of Amazon's biggest advantages, since once you have an account there, it reduces shopping friction. The biggest opportunity for products like Paypal and Google Checkout is to recreate that frictionless experience across any retailer who doesn't have the breadth of Amazon. Major merchants fighting Amazon shouldn't be requiring customers to create accounts; they should piggyback on existing payment players with network effects. Osama Bedier, who was the CTO at Paypal, and is now running payment technology for Google, remarked to me the other day that the only reason for taking a payment mechanism (from cash to credit cards) is because it increases sales. Once you realize that, you understand that using new payment mechanisms to reduce the friction of buying, and to increase the ease by which people can buy without registering (again), is absolutely critical." - Tim O'Reilly
EXACTLY! That is what I have been trying to tell all those GBF's who think that Amazon is going to pick up Google Check out. Will they? I'm not 'in the know' so only my future will tell. My thoughts? WHY WOULD THEY? - Heidi Jacobson
Tim O'Reilly
"Can reports be interfaces? Sure, but are they? Consider as a thought experiment the difference between a paper map, or even first generation online maps, and what you experience now with mapping on your phone. The map is now an interface to data and services - what's nearby, how to get from one place to another, how long it will take by car, by public transit, by bicycle, or on foot, which of your friends are in the neighborhood, and much more. That's a data visualization as an interface. Statistical visualizations can also be interfaces. Check out the cool demo of Microsoft's Pivot interface. http://www.microsoft.com/press... This is the same kind of approach that Bloom is taking to visualization as interface. But stick with the map example, and think on how a shift of framing can help you turn an output-only visualization into a set of new affordances." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: Bye Bye, Long Tail - http://techcrunch.com/2011...
"One-click is one of Amazon's biggest advantages, since once you have an account there, it reduces shopping friction. The biggest opportunity for products like Paypal and Google Checkout is to recreate that frictionless experience across any retailer who doesn't have the breadth of Amazon. Major merchants fighting Amazon shouldn't be requiring customers to create accounts; they should piggyback on existing payment players with network effects. Osama Bedier, who was the CTO at Paypal, and is now running payment technology for Google, remarked to me the other day that the only reason for taking a payment mechanism (from cash to credit cards) is because it increases sales. Once you realize that, you understand that using new payment mechanisms to reduce the friction of buying, and to increase the ease by which people can buy without registering (again), is absolutely critical." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"Can reports be interfaces? Sure, but are they? Consider as a thought experiment the difference between a paper map, or even first generation online maps, and what you experience now with mapping on your phone. The map is now an interface to data and services - what's nearby, how to get from one place to another, how long it will take by car, by public transit, by bicycle, or on foot, which of your friends are in the neighborhood, and much more. That's a data visualization as an interface. Statistical visualizations can also be interfaces. Check out the cool demo of Microsoft's Pivot interface. http://www.microsoft.com/press... This is the same kind of approach that Bloom is taking to visualization as interface. But stick with the map example, and think on how a shift of framing can help you turn an output-only visualization into a set of new affordances." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: The Politically Incorrect Guide to Ending Poverty - Magazine - The Atlantic - http://www.theatlantic.com/preview...
"I love the fresh thinking Romer displays. It is so easy to go down the same rutted roads to the same bleak destinations. It's great when someone comes up with a new idea. I hope someone has the guts to try this. Or try it again, since the historical precedents are compelling." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: The Politically Incorrect Guide to Ending Poverty - Magazine - The Atlantic - http://www.disqus.com/people...
"I love the fresh thinking Romer displays. It is so easy to go down the same rutted roads to the same bleak destinations. It's great when someone comes up with a new idea. I hope someone has the guts to try this. Or try it again, since the historical precedents are compelling." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: The Politically Incorrect Guide to Ending Poverty - Magazine - The Atlantic - http://theatlantic.disqus.com/the_pol...
"I love the fresh thinking Romer displays. It is so easy to go down the same rutted roads to the same bleak destinations. It's great when someone comes up with a new idea. I hope someone has the guts to try this. Or try it again, since the historical precedents are compelling." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"See my comment here, riffing off Katrin Eismann's question about this: http://www.facebook.com/profil..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
"See my comment here, riffing off Katrin Eismann's question about this: http://www.facebook.com/profile......" - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: My iPad? A Great Bundle of Sticks - http://andrewmcafee.org/2010...
"I agree with you, Andrew. I've always disliked the moralistic approach to copyright. I dislike the direction of our copyright laws, which give near-perpetual protection even to works that are abandoned by their owners, and that's a real problem. And our patent system is worse, granting rights for "inventions" that are obvious, or have never even actually been made. But in general, I prefer arguments that make the practical case for sharing rather than some kind of moral case. That's what I wrote about in my essay Piracy is Progressive Taxation http://openp2p.com/pub....... and in the piece about free software that I wrote for Nature entitled Information Wants to Be Valuable http://www.nature.com/nature......" - Tim O'Reilly
Tim, both links in your comment are dead. - earlyadopter
Tim O'Reilly
Re: My iPad? A Great Bundle of Sticks - http://andrewmcafee.disqus.com/my_ipad...
"I agree with you, Andrew. I've always disliked the moralistic approach to copyright. I dislike the direction of our copyright laws, which give near-perpetual protection even to works that are abandoned by their owners, and that's a real problem. And our patent system is worse, granting rights for "inventions" that are obvious, or have never even actually been made. But in general, I prefer arguments that make the practical case for sharing rather than some kind of moral case. That's what I wrote about in my essay Piracy is Progressive Taxation http://openp2p.com/pub....... and in the piece about free software that I wrote for Nature entitled Information Wants to Be Valuable http://www.nature.com/nature......" - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: My iPad? A Great Bundle of Sticks - http://www.disqus.com/people...
"I agree with you, Andrew. I've always disliked the moralistic approach to copyright. I dislike the direction of our copyright laws, which give near-perpetual protection even to works that are abandoned by their owners, and that's a real problem. And our patent system is worse, granting rights for "inventions" that are obvious, or have never even actually been made. But in general, I prefer arguments that make the practical case for sharing rather than some kind of moral case. That's what I wrote about in my essay Piracy is Progressive Taxation http://openp2p.com/pub/a/p2p/2... and in the piece about free software that I wrote for Nature entitled Information Wants to Be Valuable http://www.nature.com/nature/d..." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://www.disqus.com/people...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://chaim.com/blog...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://chaim.com/blog...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://akagra.disqus.com/when_40...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://www.disqus.com/people...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When 40%-Off Your Total Purchase Becomes 0.3%-Off - http://www.chaim.com/blog...
"Chaim, Allen - I'm sure that we can arrange an "out of shopping cart" sale - just send an email to tim at oreilly and we'll find a way to make it happen for you." - Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly
Re: When Real Time Is Not Fast Enough: The Intent Based Web - http://www.web-strategist.com/blog...
"Peter, this may be a bit premature, but it isn't silly. For example, in many ways, NextJump is an intention web ecommerce site. People register their preferences - stuff they are looking for - and merchants bid to provide it. They have gotten sufficiently good at fine-tuning preferences that one in eleven offers are accepted. Pretty amazing. There's going to be a writeup on the company in the NYT on Sunday, I believe. (I was interviewed for the story. I don't have any connection to the company, but have met with them a couple of times.)" - Tim O'Reilly
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