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M F

M F

Inquisitive, guitar playing and information overloaded guy based in London
Kwasi Kwarteng: 'We have created a culture in which people can, as a lifestyle, opt not to work' - video | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk - http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment...
Kwasi Kwarteng: 'We have created a culture in which people can, as a lifestyle, opt not to work' - video | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
"Conservative MP Kwasi Kwarteng, the co-author of Britannia Unchained, argues that Britons must work harder if the country is to compete with China and India. He says purpose of the welfare system has been distorted since its incarnation in postwar Britain and that people should no longer shy away from manual labour" - M F from Bookmarklet
This is interesting. When I was young I worked in pubs for very little money, but if you complain on how poor you are when you do manual work in this country, people will tell you to study and improve yourself and get a better job. - M F
Which ok might not work for everyone and someone has to clean the streets. - M F
But then you cannot tell people to go back and clean the streets for little money when you have been telling them for decades that it is their responsibility to improve themselves. Sorry but when you have a family and lose your job you cannot survive on the minimum wage without the help of the welfare state even if you are prepared to do manual work and work at all hours. - M F
I just love it when a former Etonian and Oxbridge grad tells people they need to do (hard) manual labour and not shy away from work! :-/ - Halil
To be honest I think I had more fun working in pubs than in offices, it's the low pay that is the problem. Hard work is fine but not to have money to feed yourself properly when you work full time is not acceptable. - M F
Hard/dirty/grimy work and low pay will always be married partners so long as the people running those enterprises are driven by greed. I refer you to this article posted by Spidra: http://ff.im/14qmDG - Halil
A lot of people would pick low pay for a job they enjoy - as long as they can live on it and save a little. Even hard manual work can be enjoyable - many of these jobs have visible results and a good team spirit - again as long as you can live decently on what you earn, and are correctly provided for (i.e. employer takes duty of care seriously), and can save a little. I want to know... more... - Iphigenie
And what is so wrong to a world where people could, as a lifestyle, decide not to work? There's not enough work for everyone, the kind of growth we'd need to give everyone a job would implie consumption on a scale that is unsustainable, and most people who don't work happen to be carers or do other valuable social roles, or are people who need help and care. Making them "work" wouldnt help anyone. - Iphigenie
I try not to buy anything from places that don't pay their staff a decent wage but it is difficult as I cannot do the research required for every single thing I buy or use, I like the idea of a Fair Trade, or Fair Wage label, that would be cool. - M F
Yeah - it gets to be pretty impossible if you look at how they pay/treat people here, how they pay/treat people abroad, how they treat their suppliers, environmental considerations, whether they have a side business in anti-personal mines, or other unethical behaviours part or present - you can't buy much. Pick your compromise. - Iphigenie
@Iphigenie your statement is so depressingly true - Halil
If you can afford the time to find them, find small companies, small retailers etc. It's no guarantee but in general they just treat their people better, because individuals are more visible in a company of 500 than of 50000. Problem is we dont have the time to find research for every product. And when even the coop can start squeezing farmers to oblivion, you have to keep researching... more... - Iphigenie
to go back to what these guys are saying - it's interesting how these things are always framed as some kind of choice. Women chose to work part time or stop work to care for children (not mentioning that they might chose differently if other choices were possible). People chose not to work (again, if other choices were possible, if more support and choices had been available, most of these people would have chosen paths that don't lead to them not finding decent, humane, work). - Iphigenie
I agree and all these people are privileged they have always had choices they cannot imagine what it like when you do not have them or you only have a few and all very unsatisfactory. - M F
Choice is an illusion, at least for many. When you have no money, no prospects, no old school boy contacts to help you along, choice is not an option. It's better to be rich and dumb, than poor and dumb, since the latter will always get stick. And on that point, how many rich dumb kids are running the country/companies/banks etc because of money/family name/social status etc? Whilst... more... - Halil
The other lie they tell you is that if you work hard you will succeed. The world is full of people who have worked hard and stayed poor. Many of them are not stupid but they lack opportunities, it is difficult to think of opportunities when you are struggling to make ends meet. Try and ask someone working 60/70 hours a week if they have ever thought of going to uni to improve themselves. - M F
Yes, the "work hard" of very successful people has nothing in common with the work hard of people one supports via Kiva. I remember one lady listed on there, she was nearling 70 and doing 3 different jobs to keep things afloat. Crazy to imagine, and not all that awesome, but I certainly admire her! Never give up... but not everyone can not give up when life beats you over and over - Iphigenie
Bee study lifts lid on hive habits | Environment | guardian.co.uk - http://www.guardian.co.uk/environ...
Bee study lifts lid on hive habits | Environment | guardian.co.uk
"Experiments on the division of labour in honeybee hives have revealed why some bees do the waggle dance while others nurse their queens. The roles require drastically different behaviours, with nurses feeding the larvae and performing royal grooming duties, and foragers navigating great distances and performing complex dance routines to point others in the direction of rich sources of nectar." - M F from Bookmarklet
£500m in three years: what you paid to send diplomats' children to school - UK Politics - UK - The Independent - http://www.independent.co.uk/news...
£500m in three years: what you paid to send diplomats' children to school - UK Politics - UK - The Independent
"The Government has spent more than half a billion pounds sending the children of diplomats and military personnel to Britain's most prestigious private schools over the last three years, new figures have revealed. Ministers last year backed down on plans to scrap the allowance, which costs the taxpayer more than £21,000 per child, as part of public sector spending cuts. Instead they promised to cut the bill through "efficiencies". But research by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism has revealed that the cost of the perk has increased by nearly ten per cent since 2009 and last year stood at £203m across three departments." - M F from Bookmarklet
Where's the Taxpayers Alliance... - Pete : Team Marina
Yes, exactly where are they when you need them? - M F
Talking shite somewhere else - Pete : Team Marina
AAhhhhh, now I see why tuition fees were TREBLED from £3K to £9K for the average mug, I mean they need to get the money from somewhere, so why not exsanguinate the common peasants. - Halil
I am sure that they get paid enough to send their children to private school if they wish, for us common mortals the mantra is your children are your responsibility and if you cannot afford them, don't have them. - M F
Was surprised at the amount when I read it. Feels like the silent benefit of a privileged elite. - Winckel
I'm not sure all diplomatic and military personnel really earn enough to pay for board and tuition either in local private English schools, or back in the UK. This is a common demand for people in the private sector too, when relocated for a few years, that their children get access to schooling that will be valid when they go back to the UK. and the price seems high but I suspect that is what these schools cost. - Iphigenie
Hillsborough: They walked alone - The long fight for justice - Home News - UK - The Independent - http://www.independent.co.uk/news...
Hillsborough: They walked alone - The long fight for justice - Home News - UK - The Independent
"Professor John Ashton, a doctor of public health who was in the upper stand of the Leppings Lane end with his sons and nephew, treated the survivors and issued six or seven of the dead with "death certificates", noting the time of death in an exercise book with his signature. When he tried to criticise the emergency operation during evidence to the initial Taylor inquiry, he found his professional integrity under attack. Professor Ashton said yesterday that the panel report has exposed a "corruption of public life". He added: "The Thatcher government hated Liverpool. Her ministers talked about 'managed decline'. South Yorkshire Police were her favourite police force – they had fought the miners five years earlier. All these factors exacerbated the tragedy. The corruption set in."" - M F from Bookmarklet
gosh - Aldo Oldo
A famous feline travels far north…. « British Museum blog - http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2012...
A famous feline travels far north…. « British Museum blog
A famous feline travels far north…. « British Museum blog
Not the most exciting news ever but I think the seated cat is brilliant. - M F from Bookmarklet
Shakespeare's Restless World by Neil MacGregor | Books | The Guardian - http://www.guardian.co.uk/books...
Shakespeare's Restless World by Neil MacGregor | Books | The Guardian
"Currently on display at the British Museum is a round silver case, less than 5cm in diameter, with an eye-shaped glass aperture allowing the viewer to see an object inside it. The museum's director, Neil MacGregor, describes the case as similar to a "small circular box of mints" and the object as a "brownish lump, a bit like a shrivelled prune". In fact, the prune is the right eye – the "oculus dexter" as the Latin inscription on the back of the reliquary explains – of the Catholic martyr Edward Oldcorne, who was publicly hanged, drawn and quartered in Worcester in 1606." - M F from Bookmarklet
A Tudor historian's view of the Richard III excavations | BBC History Magazine - http://www.historyextra.com/blog...
A Tudor historian's view of the Richard III excavations | BBC History Magazine
"It is not surprising that for centuries Richard III has been synonymous with evil tyranny and physical deformity. To argue otherwise has been to take on three of history’s greats – Sir Thomas More, William Shakespeare and Winston Churchill, all of whom argued that Richard had been a man with a crooked back and a crooked life." - M F from Bookmarklet
Seagull Steals Camera, Films Itself Flying Off Into the Sunset - http://www.petapixel.com/2012...
Seagull Steals Camera, Films Itself Flying Off Into the Sunset
"French tourist Nathalie Rollandin came across a camera-happy seagull recently. She was visiting the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, when she set her GoPro camera down while its was recording. Before she knew it, the camera was being carried away in the mouth of an artsy gull. Once the bird was a safe distance away, it set the camera down and recorded some beautiful footage of itself flying away into the sunset." - M F from Bookmarklet
There is a good chance that the video is a hoax: http://www.livescience.com/23150-s... - John (bird whisperer)
I chose not to think how the seagull took the camera, flew with it and then gently dropped it on the ground, as unlikely as it might be. With all the bad news I read please don't spoil my anthropomorphic seagull with camera, I have to believe in something :D - M F
BBC News - Tory MP Rob Wilson says reshuffle shows coalition 'winding down' - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news...
BBC News - Tory MP Rob Wilson says reshuffle shows coalition 'winding down'
"Rob Wilson, the Conservative MP for Reading East, says the reshuffle is "part of the process of the divorce with the Liberal Democrats"." - M F from Bookmarklet
"He told BBC Radio Berkshire the coalition was now "winding down" and that David Cameron would not care if Lib Dems were unhappy with the changes." - M F
Fair enough but the reason why they exist is thanks not just to the coalition with the Lib Dems but to people who voted Lib Dem who have been generally disregarded. Selling the NHS, people needing food banks and increasing inequality is not what I wanted when I voted. - M F
True. I voted Lib Dem. Now, even if I vote Labour, it would not change the balance any- pretty Labour area where I live and where I'm going to move. - Pete : Team Marina
I voted Lib Dem too but I had little choice as I lived in Kingston upon Thames at the time and it was Ed Davey versus some Tory person, voting a Lib Dem with a good chance to win seemed the right thing to do. But I would rather vote for Garfield the cat than a Tory. - M F
It'd be nice to have the Lib Dems be Lib Dems again - they often made sense on many topics where the other two are too entrenched in party lines to actually think about reality, and that reality check has been missing in UK politics for a couple years now - Iphigenie
I was told something disturbing the other day, "if you think things are bad now, you've seen nothing yet, things are going to get worse" not word for word, but you get the meaning, from a reliable source! :'( - Halil
Meaning that the government is getting nastier? - M F
and the cut backs are going to get deeper - Halil
I think so too but I really do not know what they are trying to achieve besides selling everything we own and making a large number of people destitute. - M F
It's hard to see how the Liberals sleep at night, I'm quite sure they aren't and realise what a mess they've been responsible for in creating this coalition, and will likely bear the full brunt of it in the coming GE. Tories will get punished, but the Lib Dems will get destroyed. In all honesty, this will be more devastating for our democracy as we'll end up with a 2 party government... more... - Halil
I dunno, sounds like they knew they were getting in bed with the devil and did it anyways, so fuck 'em. - Andrew C (✔)
Grant Shapps founded company selling software that breaches Google code - http://www.guardian.co.uk/politic...
Grant Shapps founded company selling software that breaches Google code
"Grant Shapps, the Conservative housing minister tipped for promotion to the cabinet this week, founded a family business selling software that increases a website's advertising revenue by breaching Google's code of practice. The $497 (£313) software package, TrafficPaymaster, creates web pages by "spinning and scraping" content from other sites to attract advertising from Google. Millions of people who have blogs or websites are paid for hosting ads on Google's behalf using the AdSense service, which scans a web page and posts adverts related to the content. TrafficPaymaster creates an instant cashflow by appearing to plagiarise information." - M F from Bookmarklet
Ah one of those SEO gurus that I dislike so much - M F
And he followed me on Twitter some months ago, obviously all part of his strategy. - M F
Atos holds £3bn of government contracts | Society | The Guardian - http://www.guardian.co.uk/society...
Atos holds £3bn of government contracts | Society | The Guardian
"Ministers have outsourced more than £3bn of public services to Atos, the multinational IT firm whose sponsorship of the Paralympics has prompted a nationwide campaign by disability activists. A series of parliamentary questions from Labour MP Tom Greatrex reveals the value of contracts with Atos is now more than a third higher than the amount outsourced by the last government. The replies expose how far the reach of the company extends in Whitehall." - M F from Bookmarklet
not a bad business. and the benefits go to shareholders. - Winckel
NHS franchising: the toxic world of globalised healthcare is upon us | Allyson Pollock | Comment is free | The Guardian - http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment...
NHS franchising: the toxic world of globalised healthcare is upon us | Allyson Pollock | Comment is free | The Guardian
"Since 1948, the NHS has been the model for universal heathcare on the basis of need and free at the point of use. In 2012, parliament in England passed a law effectively ending the NHS by abolishing the 60-year duty on the government to secure and provide healthcare for all. From 2013, there will be no National Health Service in England, and tax funding will increasingly flow to global healthcare corporations. In contrast, Scotland and Wales will continue to have a publicly accountable national health service. NHS hospitals and services are being sold off or incorporated; land and buildings are being turned over to bankers and equity investors. RBS, Assura, Serco and Carillion, to name but a few, are raking in billions in taxpayer funds for leasing out and part-operating PFI hospitals, community clinics and GP surgeries that we once owned." - M F from Bookmarklet
London's housing crisis hotspots | News | guardian.co.uk - http://www.guardian.co.uk/news...
London's housing crisis hotspots | News | guardian.co.uk
"London's housing crisis is the result of a generation or more of failed policies that need urgent redress. That redress requires multiple policy changes: building new council housing on a mass scale is long overdue – or else the 'Kosovo-style cleansing' of the poor that Boris Johnson foresaw is unavoidable. In the short term there are only two solutions – wages and benefits must rise and rents must be capped. Instead though, the government is going in the opposite direction: cutting and capping benefits, while holding back minimum wage increases (just 1.8% in October and a freeze for workers aged under 21). Housing has become an investment opportunity for a few, while for many more it is a constant source of anxiety, insecurity and debt. What we have mapped is London at its most divided: we should not be at home to it." - M F from Bookmarklet
Did you read about the proposal to sell of expensive social housing once vacant to provide funds for new social housing? I'm guessing this will be as fantastically successful as the RTB policy, which provided loads of money that was readily pumped back into social housing repairs/new builds etc! In case you can't hear me, I'm being VERY sarcastic! - Halil
I read it yes and I know you are sarcastic - M F
Britannia Unchained: the rise of the new Tory right | Politics | The Guardian - http://www.guardian.co.uk/politic...
Britannia Unchained: the rise of the new Tory right | Politics | The Guardian
"It may come as a surprise to those who already consider the coalition a tough government, with its hairshirt rhetoric and seemingly endless spending cuts, but a growing number of Tory backbenchers, business figures, commentators and thinkers feel that the coalition – and by implication, other austerity governments across the west – is not nearly tough enough. Since 2011, as the British economy has slumped, this energetic but largely unnoticed political alliance, somewhere between a lobby group and a proper movement, has begun to show its strength." - M F from Bookmarklet
dont like him. dont like them. they lack humanity and, call it arrogance or not, I think they are so full of themselves they can't see the wood for the trees. - Winckel
They can't see beyond their ideology and are not in touch with reality. It is all very well to say that they want to abolish employment laws saying that only the lazy would lose out, in reality hard working and competent people would get fired with no reason because their faces don't fit, because they can find someone cheaper, because they are very good and their boss feels threatened,... more... - M F
Besides the fact that I do not see any correlation between the right to hire and fire at will and a booming economy. - M F
Hang on, I'm pretty sure we have the right to hire and fire in this country already. At least I remember hiring quite a few people, and alas firing a few too - when in probabtion, during their first year, through (painful) redundancies in tought times, and even two for major faults. It was always clear what was possible, why, and how to do it, and normal business needs were never harmed by the limitations. - Iphigenie
Exactly, businesses can already hire and fire when they need to, removing the existing employment laws would just remove any protection employees have. At least now, especially after probation, employers have to prove they have a legitimate reason for firing and not just "I don't like you, get out". - M F
How Long Until We Learn Animal Languages? : Discovery News - http://news.discovery.com/animals...
How Long Until We Learn Animal Languages? : Discovery News
"Surely, as the most intelligent species, humans could learn to understand dolphin-speak better than dolphins learn sign language. Instead of trying to teach human communication systems to animals, why don't people decode theirs?" - M F from Bookmarklet
"Alan! Alan! Alan!....oh, wait. Isn't that Steve? Steve! Steve! Steve!" - (Curtis) Alan Jackson
'Dark day for justice' in Bahrain as activist receives three-year prison sentence | Amnesty International - http://www.amnesty.org/en...
'Dark day for justice' in Bahrain as activist receives three-year prison sentence | Amnesty International
"A Bahrain court's decision to sentence a prominent human rights activist to three years in prison for taking part in an anti-government protest is a "dark day for justice" in the country Amnesty International said today. Nabeel Rajab, the President of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, was found guilty of taking part in an “illegal gathering” among other charges in relation to a protest in the capital Manama on 6 February 2012." - M F from Bookmarklet
Bus stop in London 1956 | Flickr - Photo Sharing! - http://emmeffe.posterous.com/bus-sto...
Bus stop in London 1956 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
THE BLUE LANTERN: The Persevering Carp - http://thebluelantern.blogspot.co.uk/2012...
THE BLUE LANTERN: The Persevering Carp
THE BLUE LANTERN: The Persevering Carp
"The carp or Japanaese Koi fish. swimming upstream valiantly against the current, symbolizes perseverance. During the last quarter of the 19th century, it swam around the world, trailed by schools of artists at every turn. At the same time that Louis Comfort Tiffany was designing a green bell lamp in the style of ancient Egypt, he conceived this swirling stained glass window in the shape of a carp." - M F from Bookmarklet
Ed Sheeran fans mistake Pink Floyd hit for new song | Gigwise - http://www.gigwise.com/news...
Ed Sheeran fans mistake Pink Floyd hit for new song | Gigwise
Ed Sheeran fans mistake Pink Floyd hit for new song | Gigwise
"Ed Sheeran fans mistook the Pink Floyd song he performed alongside Nick Mason from the band at last night's Olympic Games closing ceremony for a new song." - M F from Bookmarklet
Sometimes I am glad I am no longer that young. - M F
Bad attitudes do not cause disability any more than good attitudes guarantee health | | Independent Editor's choice Blogs - http://blogs.independent.co.uk/2012...
Bad attitudes do not cause disability any more than good attitudes guarantee health | | Independent Editor's choice Blogs
"Using a snapshot of disabled people as a tool to convey a message to, primarily, non-disabled people, involves playing on stereotypes and assumptions. It removes a person’s humanity and individuality in order to present them in a way that will goad a non-disabled person to buck up their ideas. It does not matter who the people in these photographs are, as long as their representation is enough to guilt non-disabled people into action. Their use of prosthetics is the only thing about them that is of interest in these images, and it automatically turns them into some kind of superhero. Along with the captions, the implication is supposed to be, “Wow, they have a great attitude!”." - M F from Bookmarklet
"Stating that the only disability in life is a bad attitude also puts the blame on disabled people for their predicament. When I fell down the stairs a few days ago I misguidedly tried to work out which failing body part had caused the tumble when, presumably, I should have been adjusting my attitude instead: a much more effective way to prevent further falls.!" - M F
A good article that makes some valid points. - M F
I hate when people use other people's experiences/attitudes about how they overcame/accepted their own disabilities, and look at you as if you are the problem, like, if they can do it, so can you and therefore you deserve no sympathy. Snap out of it, buck up, move on...this is some of the most egregiously cold remarks that you could possibly make. It's very easy to judge both physically and mentally disabled people when you aren't disabled yourself. Why not just round us all up and put us in camps already. - Halil
Absolutely and you see it a lot with the Olympics. So and so overcame depression to win a gold and the other so and so had cancer and decided to train harder etc. They might be good stories but are so one dimensional as they concentrate on one aspect of their lives, they could be unpleasant and selfish people for all we know. Still they are turned into role models. - M F
Royal Mail defends decision to deny Paralympic gold medallists own stamps Failure to honour winners at Paralympics in same way as Olympians prompts outcry online http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport... I guess it's because they had a bad attitude, if they all had a good attitude they would of received individual stamps like the other Olympians? - Halil
Lesser spotted animals on the tube – Now. Here. This. – Time Out London - http://now-here-this.timeout.com/2012...
Lesser spotted animals on the tube – Now. Here. This. – Time Out London
Lesser spotted animals on the tube – Now. Here. This. – Time Out London
Show all
"We were delighted to see Stephen Ebert’s tweet making the rounds last night, and judging by the thousands of retweets it got, we weren’t alone. So on that note, here are some of our other favourite animal-on-transport moments" - M F from Bookmarklet
‘Up North’ to become a single constituency, vows Cameron - http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/politic...
‘Up North’ to become a single constituency, vows Cameron
"Under David Cameron’s proposed new constituency boundaries, Up North – which includes traditional Labour strongholds Manchester, Liverpool and Newcastle – will elect a single MP. Meanwhile David Cameron’s home town of Chipping Norton would be split into 27 constituencies, three of them representing areas of Cameron’s house." - M F from Bookmarklet
The London Olympics has much to delight – but forget any talk of a legacy | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | The Guardian - http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment...
The London Olympics has much to delight – but forget any talk of a legacy | Simon Jenkins | Comment is free | The Guardian
"More worrying is the impact on political discourse. Apparently any gesture of national prestige, glory and self-congratulation, once declared by government to be "worth every penny", is beyond rational debate. To quarrel with any feature of the games is to be a whingeing, unpatriotic naysayer. Normally hard-headed politicians (and journalists) have gone soft in the head – flat-earthers, creationists, climate-change deniers." - M F from Bookmarklet
I've always believed that the Olympics would drive people on a low income away from parts of the East End, make some landlords richer and be mostly paid by the rest of us. The reality has been even worse than expected. Still they are fun to watch. - M F
alas it would have happened in any regeneration of the east end - and there would have been one even without the olympics... - Iphigenie
Oh yes that's what happened in other areas of London, destroyed communities to build luxury flats. The sad thing is that if you walk into any council estate you see children playing outside everywhere, you enter one of those gated luxury estates and children are not allowed to play anywhere and are locked inside their luxury flats. - M F
I must say, I don't accept that's the inevitable legacy of a great Olympics. Issues we have, yes, the richest councils provide the best playgrounds and sports facilities to kids who need them least. But inspiring kids to embrace sport, to win, to the the best in the world? That's a great thing and we should be proud of it. - Winckel
Serco set to take charge of 'big society' initiative | Society | The Observer - http://www.guardian.co.uk/society...
Serco set to take charge of 'big society' initiative | Society | The Observer
"The company, which recently announced global revenue of more than £4bn, has joined four charities in a controversial bid to run what has been described by the government as a key part of David Cameron's big society vision. Serco and its partners hope to win eight of the 19 contracts currently up for tender, with an estimated value of nearly £100m over two years. The development has raised concerns that the National Citizen Service (NCS) will become another way for private firms to make money from the public sector as charities and voluntary organisations find themselves without the resources to bid for large contracts amid the economic squeeze." - M F from Bookmarklet
greed breeds poverty, so how can a private company hope to create a big society, what is their ethos? - Halil
It’s not the benefit fraudsters who are targeted in the media, it’s the disabled | | Independent Notebook Blogs - http://blogs.independent.co.uk/2012...
It’s not the benefit fraudsters who are targeted in the media, it’s the disabled | | Independent Notebook Blogs
"However, for a longer time there have been a large number of very different stories about people who receive disability and sickness benefits in the press. In the government’s attempt to show it is getting tough on benefit fraudsters and the work shy the print media have been very willing to run stories on every release of statistics which they say show that most people who claim sickness benefits are perfectly capable of work, statistics which in reality show no such thing. A study “Bad News for Disabled People: How the newspapers are reporting disability” by Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research and Glasgow Media Unit found that there had been an increase in the number of disability related stories in the press with a decrease in those presenting a more sympathetic view. There had also been an increase in the use of words such as “scrounger”, “cheat” and “skiver” all adding to an impression that disabled people were “underserving”." - M F from Bookmarklet
New Statesman - The Olympic spirit? - http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs...
New Statesman - The Olympic spirit?
"The sanctity of the Olympics has provided the police with powers that are likely to remain long after the corporate bunting has been taken down. I choose not to see Danny Boyle’s ceremony as bread and circuses; I choose to see it as a call to arms. We must defend our freedom of expression, as those who came before us did. We must defend it because it is the only weapon we have to ensure that we, the people, can write our own history." - M F from Bookmarklet
Opening ceremony a celebration -- of protest and dissent - Alex Wolff - SI.com - http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012...
Opening ceremony a celebration -- of protest and dissent - Alex Wolff - SI.com
"Boyle, the Oscar-winning director of Slumdog Millionaire, spent almost four times less money and deployed roughly one-tenth as many people. But he outstripped the previous Olympic host city by flaunting what the Chinese actively suppressed. This was pageantry as jiu-jitsu. While Britain's coalition government weighs further cuts to its government-run health-care system, Boyle went out of his way to honor the National Health Service, with real NHS employees as nurses capering on hospital beds. The show also included a nod to the early-20th-century suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst and the Jarrow Marchers, who in 1936 walked more than 300 miles from County Durham to London to protest hunger and joblessness. When Boyle made a point of inviting their descendants to the proceedings, he also made a point to us." - M F from Bookmarklet
NBC's opening ceremony mess: the top six cringeworthy moments | Media | guardian.co.uk - http://www.guardian.co.uk/media...
NBC's opening ceremony mess: the top six cringeworthy moments | Media | guardian.co.uk
"NBC co-host Meredith Vieira failed to do her homework and thus did not recognise the importance of the inventor of the world wide web. "If you haven't heard of him, we haven't either," she said. "Google him," joked co-host Matt Lauer." - M F from Bookmarklet
The world already has a pretty low opinion of Americans. Thanks for having just as low a one, NBC. :( - Spidra Webster
I like this a lot. It feeds many of my - occasionally wide of the mark - views of these people. I read too that the ceremony wasn't shown live in the US, I wondered what that said about the country; perhaps nothing good. - Winckel
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