Sign in or Join FriendFeed
FriendFeed is the easiest way to share online. Learn more »

futureseek › Likes

Amira
'You don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it' | NASA Lunar Science Institute http://amiquote.tumblr.com/post... http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/article...
nasa.jpg
"Consider that you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are traveling at 220 km/sec across the galaxy. 90% of the cells in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not “you.” The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star. Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato. The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does not exist. So you don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colors you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum." - Amira
Amira
“We live at a time when friendship has become both all and nothing at all. (...) Facebook isn’t the whole of contemporary friendship, but it sure looks a lot like its future. (...) Inevitably, the classical ideal [of friendship] has faded. The image of the one true friend, a soul mate rare to find but dearly beloved, has completely disappeared from our culture. (...) We seem to be terribly fragile now. A friend fulfills her duty, we suppose, by taking our side—validating our feelings, supporting our decisions, helping us to feel good about ourselves. (...) We’re busy people; we want our friendships fun and friction-free. (...) Friendship is devolving, in other words, from a relationship to a feeling—from something people share to something each of us hugs privately to ourselves in the loneliness of our electronic caves, rearranging the tokens of connection like a lonely child playing with dolls. (...) Until a few years ago, you could share your thoughts with only one friend at a time... more... - Amira from Bookmarklet
"'Friendship (like activism) has been smoothly integrated into our new electronic lifestyles. We’re too busy to spare our friends more time than it takes to send a text. We’re too busy, sending texts. And what happens when we do find the time to get together? (...) The more people we know, the lonelier we get. ["About me" section] Identity is reducible to information (...) So... more... - Amira
thanks for your pointer to this well-written essay on how the evolution of social communication (mutated by tech :-) affects our friendships. Deresiewicz also gave a radio interview: http://www.nhpr.org/audio... 14-min MP3. - Adriano
Thank you Adriano! :-) I'm listening right now - Amira
Amira
The Self Illusion: How the Brain Creates Identity | Edge - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post...
The Self Illusion: How the Brain Creates Identity | Edge
"John Locke, the philosopher, who also argued that personal identity was really dependent on the autobiographical or episodic memories, and you are the sum of your memories, which, of course, is something that fractionates and fragments in various forms of dementia. (...) As we all know, memory is notoriously fallible. It’s not cast in stone. It’s not something that is stable. It’s constantly reshaping itself. So the fact that we have a multitude of unconscious processes which are generating this coherence of consciousness, which is the I experience, and the truth that our memories are very selective and ultimately corruptible, we tend to remember things which fit with our general characterization of what our self is. We tend to ignore all the information that is inconsistent. We have all these attribution biases. We have cognitive dissonance. The very thing psychology keeps telling us, that we have all these unconscious mechanisms that reframe information, to fit with a coherent... more... - Amira from Bookmarklet
The hierarchy of representations in the brain: "Representations are literally re-presentations. That’s the language of the brain, that’s the mode of thinking in the brain, it’s representation. It’s more than likely, in fact, it’s most likely that there is already representation wired into the brain. If you think about the sensory systems, the array of the eye, for example, is already... more... - Amira
[Update] "The Illusion of the Self" -- Bruce Hood interviewed by Sam Harris: "I think that both the “I” and the “me” are actually ever-changing narratives generated by our brain to provide a coherent framework to organize the output of all the factors that contribute to our thoughts and behaviors. I think it helps to compare the experience of self to subjective contours – illusions such... more... - Amira
"By rejecting the notion of a core self and considering how we are a multitude of competing urges and impulses, I think it is easier to understand why we suddenly go off the rails. It explains why we act, often unconsciously, in a way that is inconsistent with our self image – or the image of our self as we believe others see us. That said, the self illusion is probably an inescapable... more... - Amira
Amira
The Difference Between Online Knowledge and Truly Open Knowledge. In the era of the Internet facts are not bricks but networks - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post...
The Difference Between Online Knowledge and Truly Open Knowledge. In the era of the Internet facts are not bricks but networks
"Knowledge qua knowledge, Weinberger claims, is increasingly enmeshed in webs of discourse: culture-dependent and theory-free. (...) The existence of hyperlinks is enough to convince even the most stubborn positivist that there is always another side to the story. And on the web, fringe believers can always find each other and marinate in their own illusions. The “web world” is too big to ever know. There is always another link. In the era of the Internet, Weinberger argues, facts are not bricks. They are networks. (…) Human beings (or rather “Dasein,” “being-in-the-world”) are always thrown into a particular context, existing within already existing language structures and pre-determined meanings. In other words, the world is like the web, and we, Dasein, live inside the links. (…)" - Amira from Bookmarklet
"If knowledge has always been networked knowledge, than facts have never had stable containers. Most of the time, though, we more or less act as if they do. (...) Black boxes emerge out of actually-existing knowledge networks, stabilize for a time, and unravel, and our goal as thinkers and scholars ought to be understanding how these nodes emerge and disappear. (...) Done well, digital... more... - Amira
David Weinberger: "I think the Net generation is beginning to see knowledge in a way that is closer to the truth about knowledge. (...) Knowing looks less like capturing truths in books than engaging in never-settled networks of discussion and argument. (...) This new topology of knowledge reflects the topology of the Net. The Net (and especially the Web) is constructed quite literally... more... - Amira
Wildcat
Hyperconnected Bodies, the rising cloud of self-aware data http://www.realityaugmentedblog.com/2012...
Amira
How Language Works. The cognitive science of linguistics | Indiana University - http://www.indiana.edu/~hlw/
How Language Works. The cognitive science of linguistics | Indiana University
"One way to define linguistics is as the study of language itself, which can be contrasted with language behavior. Language behavior is studied by people in the fields of psycholinguistics, language development, natural language processing, and computational linguistics, and there is often an attempt to keep these fields distinct from linguistics "proper". I believe that it is more productive to see all of these fields as making up "the language sciences" or "language science", and it is really this meta-field that is the topic of this book." - Amira from Bookmarklet
Amira
Physicists reveal nature’s mathematical formula for survival - http://www.rdmag.com/News...
Physicists reveal nature’s mathematical formula for survival
"The vascular system of a leaf provides its structure and delivers its nutrients. When you light up that vascular structure with some fluorescent dye and view it using time-lapse photography, details begin to emerge that reveal nature's mathematical formula for survival. (...) "If you begin looking at them in any degree of detail, you will see all of those beautiful arrangements of impinging angles and where the big veins meet the little veins and how well they are arranged," (...) It's a pattern that can neutralize the effect of a wound to the leaf, such as a hole in its main vein. Nutrients bypass the hole and the leaf remains completely intact. "Something that looks pretty looks pretty for a really good reason. It has a well defined and elegant function. We can scan the leaves at extremely high resolution and reconstruct every single little piece of vein, who talks to who, who is connected to who and so forth," (...) - Amira from Bookmarklet
"This research is a unique interdisciplinary partnership in which physics is used to address biological problems, and it is our belief that the mathematical and physical sciences will play a major role in biomedical research in this century," (...) Magnasco says this research is a jumping off point for understanding other systems that branch and rejoin, including everything from river... more... - Amira
Revealing Nature's Mathematical Formula for Survival (video) http://www.youtube.com/watch... - Amira
Wildcat
Op-Ed: IBM’s cognitive computers are coming & they reprogram themselves | @scoopit http://www.scoop.it/t...
Wildcat
On Becoming a Reality Architect: Exploring the Power of Connection Between People and Algorithms (TEDXSilico | @scoopit http://www.scoop.it/t...
Amira
Edward O. Wilson “The Social Conquest of Earth” | FORA.tv - http://fora.tv/2012...
Edward O. Wilson “The Social Conquest of Earth” | FORA.tv
"Edward O. Wilson has revolutionized science and inspired the public more often than any other living biologist. Now he is blending his pioneer work on ants with a new perspective on human development to propose a radical reframing of how evolution works.First the social insects ruled, from 60 million years ago. Then a species of social mammals took over, from 10 thousand years ago. Both sets of “eusocial” animals mastered the supremely delicate art of encouraging altruism, so that individuals in the groups would act as if they value the goal of the group over their own goals. They would specialize for the group and die for the group. In recent decades the idea of “kin selection” seemed to explain how such an astonishing phenomenon could evolve. Wilson replaces kin selection with “multi-level selection,” which incorporates both individual selection (long well understood) and group selection (long considered taboo). Every human and every human society has to learn how to manage... more... - Amira from Bookmarklet
“Mythmaking could never discover the origin and meaning of humanity” — and contemporary philosophy is also irrelevant, having “long ago abandoned the foundational questions about human existence.” The proper approach to answering these deep questions is the application of the methods of science, including archaeology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. Also, we should study... more... - Amira
Alexander Kruel
Machines become more user-friendly with time - http://kruel.co/2012...
Alexander Kruel
Superhuman intelligence implies intelligence - http://kruel.co/2012...
Amira
Is talking on the phone so passé? “We’re well on our way to becoming an incredibly disconnected connected society.” - http://www.wilsonquarterly.com/article...
Is talking on the phone so passé? “We’re well on our way to becoming an incredibly disconnected connected society.”
"Where the world’s wires once hummed with the electrical impulses of people talking, that conversation, in the digital age, has been subsumed by all the other information we are exchanging. “At this point, voice isn’t even a rounding error in network operators’ calculations,” Stephan Beckert, an analyst with TeleGeography, a telecom research company, recently told me. To underscore the point, he sent me a chart showing “switched voice” as a thin wedge, gradually squeezed to a nearly invisible nothing by the oceanic thrust of “Internet” (and a smaller stratolayer of “private networks”). It looks as if the world has gone quiet. (...) While in 2003 the average local mobile phone call lasted a leisurely three minutes, by 2010 it had been trimmed to a terse one minute and 47 seconds. (...) Consider, for example, this casual dismissal by TheNew York Times in 1939: “The problem with television is that people must sit and keep their eyes glued on a screen; the average American family hasn’t time for it.” (...) - Amira from Bookmarklet
Ashalynd
heymicah: 1 sperm has 37.5MB of DNA info in it meaning a normal ejaculation represents a data transfer of 1587GB in 3 seconds. http://t.co/QaL9AQac - http://twitter.com/heymica...
isn't the majority of that data heavily duplicated? :) so perhaps it's just a massively redundant 37.5MB payload - Michael Bravo
Всего в 37 мегабайтах закодирован целый человек? - ʕ⨂˕̥⨂ʔ Т ПДМЛ?
Там несколько гигабайт говорят. Как минимум. Так что если не установлен firewall, то data transfer неплохой получается. - DS from iPhone
Amira
FishIE Tank | Microsoft animation http://ie.microsoft.com/testdri...
1.jpg
"Speed Demo” the FishIE Tank demonstrates hardware acceleration, canvas based image manipulation and PNG based sprite sheet animation." http://adamkinney.com/blog... - Amira
Amira
Theodor W. Adorno: ‘There is no element in which language resembles music more than in the punctuation marks’ (pdf) http://cdn.anonfiles.com/1334014...
9614107-box-of-vintage-wood-printing-blocks--letters-numbers-symbols-punctuation-marks-brass-inserts.jpg
punctuation.jpg
"The less punctuation marks, taken in isolation, convey meaning or expression and the more they constitute the opposite pole in language names, the more each of them acquires a definitive physiognomic status of its own, an expression of its own, which cannot be separated from its syntactic function but is by no means exhaused by it. (...) Even text, even the most densely woven, cites them of its own accord -- friendly spirits whose bodiless presence nourishes the body of language. There is no element in which language resembles music more than in the punctuation marks. The comma and the period correspond to the half-cadence and the authentic cadence. Exclamation points are like silent cymbal clashes, question marks like musical upbeats, colons dominant seventh chords; and only a person who can perceive the different weights of strong and weak phrasings in musical form can really feel the distinction between the comma and the semicolon. (...) - Amira
"Literary dilettantes can be recognized by their desire to connect everything. Their products hook sentences together with logical connectives even though the logical relationship asserted by those connectives does not hold. To the person who cannot truly conceive anything as a unit, anything that suggests disintegration or discontinuity is unbearable; only a person who can grasp... more... - Amira
This is interesting, but it is about written texts (in some modern languages; in many languages/skripts and in ancient languages there are innumerous texts without any punctuation marks, often even without marks that separate words) and script usage, not about language as such. - Maitani
Thoroughly enjoyable. - Goran Zec
Wildcat
"And the future, to be honest, is already the past. Futurism is a very old fashioned concept. That whole..." http://wildcat2030.tumblr.com/post...
Wildcat
Newly developed neuromorphic hardware will emulate the human brain | @scoopit http://www.scoop.it/t...
Wildcat
Augmented Reality Creates Interactive Pop-Up Book Through Your Webcam | @scoopit http://www.scoop.it/t...
Wildcat
RT @mocost: iPad app helps brain-injured woman communicate http://www.usatoday.com/news...
Jamreilly
Jamreilly
The Fabric of the Cosmos - The Illusion of Time - http://berto-meister.blogspot.com/2012...
The Fabric of the Cosmos - The Illusion of Time
Anibal M. Astobiza
Thinking Smarter About People Who Think Differently http://www.wired.com/wiredsc...
Amira
Living on the edge: Extreme kayakers look over the brink of Victoria Falls in Zambia http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news...
Extreme kayakers look over the brink of Victoria Falls in Zambia.jpg
WaterfallMET_468x468.jpg
"The spectacular image of extreme kayakers looking over the ferocious torrent has been shortlisted for a photo exhibition. (...) Photographers from more than 90 countries braved treacherous conditions to take pictures for the first Red Bull Illume Image Quest. Competition judges, who spent hours sifting through 7,200 photos, were looking for "images that embody commitment, passion and risk in addition to technical superiority, artistic flair and overall excellence"." // "The 3,540km long Zambezi is a gigantic and intimidating force of nature. From its source in Zambia, Africa’s fourth-longest river meanders through Angola, along the borders of Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe to Mozambique, where it empties into the Indian Ocean." https://www.redbullillume.com/insight... - Amira
Amira
Richard Feynman - The Last Journey Of A Genius | PBS’ NOVA documentary - http://www.youtube.com/watch...!
Richard Feynman - The Last Journey Of A Genius | PBS’ NOVA documentary
Play
"I'm an explorer okay, I get curious about everything and I want to investigate all kinds of stuff." -- R.F. "In 1989, PBS’ NOVA aired The Last Journey of a Genius, a television film that documents the final days of the great physicist Richard Feynman and his obsession with traveling to Tannu Tuva, a state outside of outer Mongolia, which then remained under Soviet control. For the better part of a decade, Feynman and his friend Ralph Leighton schemed to make their way to Tannu Tuva, but Cold War politics always frustrated their efforts. The video runs roughly 50 minutes and features an ailing Feynman talking about his wanderlust and their maneuverings. He died two weeks later, having never made the trip, though Ralph Leighton and Feyman’s daughter Michelle later landed in their Shangri-La. Her journey was recorded by the Russian service of the BBC." http://www.openculture.com/2011... - Amira from Bookmarklet
Whoa listen to him play the bongos! - Adrian
Amira
A history of two million years of humanity through the objects we have made | BBC & The British Museum http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistor...
1.jpg
"A History of the World was a partnership between the BBC and the British Museum (...) The programmes told a history of two million years of humanity through the objects we have made, starting with the earliest object in the museum’s collection. Deep zoom imagery of the British Museum objects on the site lets you see the objects in stunning detail while listening to the programme." - Amira
Amira
The Strange Worlds of M C Escher. "I try in my prints to testify that we live in a beautiful and orderly world, not in a chaos without norms, even though that is how it sometimes appears." - http://www.escapeintolife.com/showcas...
The Strange Worlds of M C Escher. "I try in my prints to testify that we live in a beautiful and orderly world, not in a chaos without norms, even though that is how it sometimes appears."
The Strange Worlds of M C Escher. "I try in my prints to testify that we live in a beautiful and orderly world, not in a chaos without norms, even though that is how it sometimes appears."
Show all
"The result of the struggle between the thought and the ability to express it, between dream and reality, is seldom more than a compromise or an approximation. Thus there is little chance that we will succeed in getting through to a large audience, and on the whole we are quite satisfied if we are understood and appreciated by a small number of sensitive, receptive people." — M. C. Escher - On Being a Graphic Artist - Amira from Bookmarklet
Amira
Hacker Historian George Dyson Sits Down With Kevin Kelly and talk about the big bang of the digital universe | Wired - http://www.wired.com/magazin...
Hacker Historian George Dyson Sits Down With Kevin Kelly and talk about the big bang of the digital universe | Wired
"The two most powerful technologies of the 20th century—the nuclear bomb and the computer—were invented at the same time and by the same group of young people. (...) How did the MANIAC project get started? (...) Alan Turing was the logician with the original idea. Julian Bigelow was the engineer who built the actual machine, and biologist Nils Barricelli saw where it was all going. Johnny von Neumann had the government money and confidence to make it happen, and his wife, Klari von Neumann, wrote the code. (...)" - Amira from Bookmarklet
"Turing, as a 23-year-old graduate student, derived the principles of modern computation more or less by accident—as a byproduct of his interest in something called the Entscheidungsproblem, or Decision Problem. It can be stated as: Is there a formula or mechanical process that can decide whether a string of symbols is logically provable or not? Turing’s answer was no. He restated the... more... - Amira
Amira
A first in Chinese history: city-dwellers outnumber the rural population | The Economist - http://www.economist.com/node...
A first in Chinese history: city-dwellers outnumber the rural population | The Economist
"For a nation whose culture and society have been shaped over millennia by its rice-, millet- and wheat-farming traditions, and whose ruling Communist Party rose to power in 1949 by mobilising a put-upon peasantry and encircling the cities, China has just passed a remarkable milestone. By the end of 2011, according to the National Bureau of Statistics, more than half of China’s 1.35 billion people were living in cities. (...) Touting a policy of “leaving the land but not the villages, entering the factories but not cities”, it sought industrialisation without urbanisation, only to discover that it could not have one without the other. (...) America reached the 50% mark before 1920. Britain passed it in the mid-19th century. (...)" - Amira from Bookmarklet
Amira
Cognitive scientists develop new take on old problem: why human language has so many words with multiple meanings - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post...
Cognitive scientists develop new take on old problem: why human language has so many words with multiple meanings
Show all
"Ambiguity actually makes language more efficient, by allowing for the reuse of short, efficient sounds that listeners can easily disambiguate with the help of context. (...) By comparing certain properties of words to their numbers of meanings, the researchers confirmed their suspicion that shorter, more frequent words, as well as those that conform to the language’s typical sound patterns, are most likely to be ambiguous — trends that were statistically significant in all three languages. (...) It is “cognitively cheaper” to have the listener infer certain things from the context than to have the speaker spend time on longer and more complicated utterances. The result is a system that skews toward ambiguity, reusing the “easiest” words. Once context is considered, it’s clear that “ambiguity is actually something you would want in the communication system.” (...) - Amira from Bookmarklet
“You would expect that since languages are constantly changing, they would evolve to get rid of ambiguity,” Wasow says. “But if you look at natural languages, they are massively ambiguous: Words have multiple meanings, there are multiple ways to parse strings of words. … This paper presents a really rigorous argument as to why that kind of ambiguity is actually functional for communicative purposes, rather than dysfunctional.” - Amira
this would explain why poetry books are usually the slimmest among publications -- it's cognitively cheaper for the reader to infuse meaning than for the poet to elaborate at length :-) - Adriano
I ain't even touchin' that one ^ - t-ra: lose,find,repeat
"But 'glory' doesn't mean 'a nice knock-down argument'," Alice objected. "When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather a scornful tone, "it means just what i choose it to mean -neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things." "The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master -that's all." - Lewis Carroll/Through the looking-glass - Taha
"As long as words a different sense will bear, // And each may be his own interpreter, // Our airy faith will no foundation find; // The word’s a weathercock for every wind." — John Dryden, The Hind and the Panther (1687) :-) - Amira
Other ways to read this feed:Feed readerFacebook