gardening

gardening

all things gardening
Spidra Webster
Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap - Telegraph - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardeni...
Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap - Telegraph
"Most gardeners think they “know” Kew – but is that really the case? It’s a question which arose following the publication of a report into the Royal Botanic Garden’s funding by the parliamentary Science and Technology Committee earlier this month. Their investigation was prompted by the revelation of a £5.5 million “hole” in Kew’s annual budget and the ensuing large-scale redundancies of scientists (47 have gone so far). The committee’s conclusion was damning: “We consider the current financial arrangements for funding to be a recipe for failure.” The MPs were also critical of senior management’s failure to consult its staff over the changes, and the absence, until just a few weeks ago, of a published strategy. For some at Kew, the funding crisis is of minor importance compared with the strategic direction it is now taking under director Richard Deverell, the first non-scientific director of the institution. The fear is that Kew’s international influence is finally being jettisoned... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
If you're on frenf.it and interested in gardening, I just started a more general group for plant love. (gardening, farming, plant science, etc) http://www.frenf.it/earlyad...
C'mon and join me! - Spidra Webster
Thanks! That's one of the things I was going to miss the most about FF, reading about everyone's gardening. - Trish R
Melis Donovan
No body can compare with little animal.http://www.mytopcut.com/
tumblr_nj47skCsYG1sodvexo9_540.jpg
Halil
London's Sky Garden: the more you pay, the worse the view - The Walkie-Talkie crashes into view behind Tower Bridge. - http://www.theguardian.com/artandd...
London's Sky Garden: the more you pay, the worse the view -  The Walkie-Talkie crashes into view behind Tower Bridge.
Show all
The Sky Garden was meant to be a free public space with the most spectacular views of London. But it feels like you’re trapped in an airport, you can barely see the city because of a steel cage – and the more money you shell out, the worse it gets - Halil from Bookmarklet
In fact, wherever you are in the sky garden, the views feel frustratingly distant. The city is separated from your gaze by a buffer of external parapets to the north and a smokers’ terrace to the south; nowhere can you put your face to the glass and look right down. The whole of London spreads out below, but you’ll have to crane your neck to see it. - Halil
So what about the much-vaunted garden? The glade of full-height trees, promised in the computer visualisations and used to sell the project to the planners, is mysteriously absent. It has been replaced by a pair of planted slopes dotted with hefty steel watering columns. Designed by landscape practice Gillespies, it is supposed to appear “as if you’re coming across a mountain slope,” a... more... - Halil
Anika
Garden design courses - landscape design post-graduate diploma - http://www.garden-design-courses.co.uk/
Garden design courses - landscape design post-graduate diploma
Show all
"You can now train as a garden designer from home, wherever you are in the world via our virtual classroom which utilises the latest internet-based technology. The Oxford College of Garden Design is widely regarded as one of the top contemporary garden design schools in the world and together with our sister school MyGardenSchool is the industry leader in on-line education. Our postgraduate level garden design diploma course is internationally renowned and one of the only garden design courses in the world to benefit from video based lectures, allowing students to revisit lessons on-line time and again." - Anika from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
RIVERSIDE COUNTY: Cooperative Extension solves farm problems - Press Enterprise - http://www.pe.com/article...
"The bell peppers’ new leaves were bleached at small farms in Riverside County. Tests for viruses and nematodes, a worm-like parasite, were both negative. University of California researchers solved growers’ mystery. The vegetable crops needed more phosphorous, potassium and manganese, said Jose Luis Aguiar, vegetable and small farms adviser for UC Cooperative Extension in Riverside County. Cooperative Extension has been helping farmers large and small with problems for 100 years by spreading information about university research or asking the university to figure out problems such as the one plaguing pepper growers. Extension also runs the Master Gardener program as well as providing research results and nutrition guidance to homemakers and teaching children to be leaders through 4-H throughout Riverside County. It is based in Moreno Valley and works not only with researchers at UC Riverside but also researchers other UC campuses throughout California. Aguiar’s job with county... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Succulents and More: My recipe for fast-draining potting mix - http://www.succulentsandmore.com/2011...
Succulents and More: My recipe for fast-draining potting mix
Succulents and More: My recipe for fast-draining potting mix
"I find that most commercially available cacti and succulent mixes either contain peat (which is almost impossible to rewet after it has dried out) or too much organic matter, resulting in soil that stays wet too long after watering. That, in turn, could lead to rot, especially in combination with colder weather. The only brand I feel comfortable using unamended is Black Gold Cactus Mix; the formulation for California contains 40-50% pumice, which guarantees excellent drainage. For a while now I’ve been making my own succulent soil mix. It’s cheaper than Black Gold Cactus Mix, it allows me to control all the ingredients and ratios, and it’s fun in a geeky sort of way. I use only three ingredients: 1 part coir 1 part commercial potting soil 2 parts pumice Coir is the coarse fiber from the outer husk of coconuts. Check out this earlier post about coir. I like it because it loosens up the mix while adding a bit of water retention. In contrast to peat, coir rewets easily and doesn’t... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
If you're able to watch iPlayer, check out "Glorious Gardens from Above". At first I thought it was a weird idea for a series (viewing gardens by balloon), but it's really deeper than that. The formula includes talking about the climate & terrain of the region, focus on one major garden, but also visiting other local gardens, including some
edible gardening programs that help at-risk persons or that act as therapy. They talk with volunteers and gardeners about their experiences. They talk with visitors and you hear stories about people's connection with the gardens. And so far there has been an art moment of the ones I've seen where something is given to the garden - a reproduction of an original wooden urn decoration in one case and a pastel painting of the garden in another example. - Spidra Webster
I love Christine Walkden on BBC Gardeners' Question Time and she hosts this one. I'm impressed with the rather clever format they've chosen. Check it out! Some eps are still downloable with BBC iPlayer Desktop, some can only be viewed online and 6 eps have already expired. :( - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
At ICRAF, the African Plant Breeding Academy graduates elite scientists - Agroforestry World Blog - http://blog.worldagroforestry.org/index...
At ICRAF, the African Plant Breeding Academy graduates elite scientists - Agroforestry World Blog
Show all
"Among the machines humming in the seed lab stands Alice Muchugi, Genetic Resources Unit Manager at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Alice has been with ICRAF since she was a Masters student at Kenyatta University. She is now integral to the African Orphan Crops Consortium (AOCC) and the African Plant Breeder’s Academy (AfPBA), which graduates its first class of plant breeders on Thursday, 11 December 2014. The goal of the AOCC is to use the latest scientific equipment and techniques to genetically sequence, assemble and annotate the genomes of 101 African orphan crops for the development of robust and nutritious food. The 23 breeders graduating will be the first of many – the Academy aims to train 250 plant breeders and technicians over 5 years in techniques to create improved planting materials for African smallholder farmers. “The bulk of the crops we focus on are important to the rural livelihoods of people who practice subsistence farming,” says Alice. “If these crops have... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 11 – Christmas rose (Helleborus niger) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 11 – Christmas rose (Helleborus niger) | Culham Research Group
2014 Advent Botany – Day 11 – Christmas rose (Helleborus niger) | Culham Research Group
"#AdventBotany Day 11 brings the Christmas rose (Helleborus niger). This handsome herbaceous perennial is native to the Balkans but widely planted in gardens in Britain for its large white flowers in mid-winter. In fact it can already be seen flowering in some gardens this year – enough to justify the common name “Christmas Rose” (although it is in the family Ranunculaceae and nowhere near Rosaceae!). However the plant sometimes does not live up to it’s common name and in some years the Christmas Rose flowers even later than the Lenten Rose (Helleborus orientalis). Furthermore, being in the family Ranunculaceae, the flowers are not always exactly what they seem! And so what appears at first sight to be white petals are in fact persistent sepals (technically tepals, since there are no distinct sepals and petals). One of the endearing features of Helleborus niger is it's tendency to flower when having no leaves. One of the endearing features of Helleborus niger is it’s tendency to... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 9 – Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 9 – Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) | Culham Research Group
2014 Advent Botany – Day 9 – Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) | Culham Research Group
"It’s not surprising that the red stems of this native North American shrub are a staple element of seasonal decorations across the continent. Red-osier dogwood is common in damper areas of forests. My local florist, Candice, told me how she would cut branches from bushes in ditches and woodlots for arrangements. As well as occurring naturally, red-osier dogwood has been cultivated and is a popular ornamental shrub in north America. Some cultivars with variegated leaves, like the one growing in my garden. Can you spot the black grey squirrel on the fence? As well as the decorative value, this shrub is useful for stabilizing ditch banks with its extensive root system. It is readily propagated by stem cuttings that root very readily which makes it cheap to use as well as very pretty! Reference: USDA NRCS Plant Guide: REDOSIER DOGWOOD http://plants.usda.gov/plantgu..." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Photos © Dawn Bazely. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 8 – Cranberry (Vaccinium spp.) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 8 – Cranberry (Vaccinium spp.) | Culham Research Group
"The cranberry is a small bog plant in the U.K.; Vaccinium oxycoccus, the wild cranberry is a diminutive plant of acid bog-lands, and most British botanists will tell you that they have not seen it produce more than a spoonful of fruit, let alone a jam jar full. Cranberry fruit (c) Jonathan Mitchley Cranberry fruit (c) Jonathan Mitchley The cranberry of sauce fame is not the product of the European cranberry but its rather more robust American relative Vaccinium macrocarpon – a remarkable crop, because although it’s hardly been domesticated from the wild, it has perhaps the most high tech cultivation system of any modern crop. There are even festivals to celebrate the cranberry harvest such as Warrens Cranberry festival and the Chatsworth Cranberry festival. Today, cranberry juice and cranberry sauce is available everywhere in copious quantities and not just at Christmas but throughout the year. The juice is valued for its anitoxidant properties and has a high concentration of quercetin that may have some anti-cancer activity in purified form." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 7 – Almonds (Prunus dulcis) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 7 – Almonds (Prunus dulcis) | Culham Research Group
"Day7 of #AdventBotany – did the almond tree grow from Agdistis’ severed genitals or was it created to honour Phyllis’ wait for Demophon? Almond, Prunus dulcis – a tree that provides both sweet and bitter nuts. Prunus dulcis, the almond Prunus dulcis, the almond Maria Christodoulou, a member of this research group, was brought up with one of the Greek legends about this tree “Described as crazy by locals in the Mediterranean the almond tree, Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb, is certainly one of the eccentrics in the region. Its early flowering times, sometimes as early as February, have made it a symbol of hope and regeneration. Being a flowering time pioneer however has its costs, with the first flowers often destroyed by frost. Considered one of the first nuts to be domesticated, the almond tree has a most definite dark side. The seed in its wild state produces sufficient levels of amygdalin which are transformed into cyanide when eaten. The domestication selection process, aided by... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 6 – Myrrh (Commiphora myrrah) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 6 – Myrrh (Commiphora myrrah) | Culham Research Group
2014 Advent Botany – Day 6 – Myrrh (Commiphora myrrah) | Culham Research Group
"Day 6 #AdventBotany – staying in the Burseraceae, Commiphora myrrah or Myrrh is an anti-inflammatory, flavouring and scent but over use can lead to side effects including rashes and nausea. Used in ancient Egyptian embalming of mummies. Now used to keep skin looking young. Myrrh is often used in the form of a liquid extract rather than as a solid resin. Myrrh was the third gift of the Magi to Christ. Commiphora myrrah Commiphora myrrah The Song of Solomon includes verses mentioning both Frankincense and Myrrh. “Who is this coming up from the wilderness Like palm-trees of smoke, Perfumed with myrrh and frankincense, From every powder of the merchant? Till the day doth break forth, And the shadows have fled away, I will get me unto the mountain of myrrh, And unto the hill of frankincense.” A fascinating history of Myrrh and Frankincense is available from the Institute of traditional medicine." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Advent Botany – Day 5 – Frankincense (Boswellia sacra) | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Advent Botany – Day 5 – Frankincense (Boswellia sacra) | Culham Research Group
2014 Advent Botany – Day 5 – Frankincense (Boswellia sacra) | Culham Research Group
"Day 5 #AdventBotany – resinous sap of Boswellia sacra (and other related species), from southern Arabia, called Arabia Felix for its providence in having such a valuable plant. Frankincense was arguably the fuel of the first global economy (ca. 500BC-500AD) and the ‘Land of Frankincense’ is now a World Heritage site (http://whc.unesco.org/en...). Famed in Christian cultures as the 2nd gift of the Magi to Christ. Grade one Omani Frankincense Grade one Omani Frankincense Frankincense is a slow growing tree demanding warmth for good growth. Cultivated Boswellia sacra in flower." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 4 – Gold | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 4 – Gold | Culham Research Group
"Perhaps the most obvious plants to write about are the numerous species with gold (aurea and its forms) in their names. These range from Abrus aureus, a climbing vine in the pea family that is native only to Madagascar, to Zizia aurea or “Golden Alexander”, a yellow flowered member of the carrot family native to north America however this is not the most interesting story of gold to be reported by far. Several plant species are able to accumulate metals, some in quite high concentrations by accumulation from the soil. This process is known as phytomining and can be the most cost effective way of concentrating low levels of heavy metals from soil. A major report by the US geological survey in 1968, Metal Absorption by Equisetum (Horsetail), suggested that reports of horsetail (Equisetum) accumulating high levels of gold from the environment were questionable although it did contain some gold. Other plants have been shown to accumulate a range of metals including Gold, prominent among... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 3 – Ilex | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 3 – Ilex | Culham Research Group
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 3 – Ilex | Culham Research Group
"3rd day of #AdventBotany – Ilex is the only genus in the family Aquifoliacaeae. In Europe we know Holly (Ilex aquifolium) which is the third of our Christmas evergreens alongside Ivy and Mistletoe. Holly was brought in to houses in pagan times to keep evil out but was then adopted by Christians as a representative of the crown of thorns at Christ’s crucifixion. However there are around 400 different holly species and many do not have prickly leaves. Ilex paraguariensis is used to make the infusion Mate, the caffeine rich national drink of Argentina. In contrast, Ilex crenata is grown in Japan, China and Korea as a small decorative shrub used in complex topiary displays. Botanical illustrations of <i>Ilex paraguariensis</i> (Mate) and <i>Ilex aquifolium</i> (Common Holly) Botanical illustrations of Ilex paraguariensis (Mate) and Ilex aquifolium (Common Holly) Common European Holly has numerous cultivars varying in the pricklyness of the leaves, colour of the berries and variegation of... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 1 – Hedera helix | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 1 – Hedera helix | Culham Research Group
"1st day of #AdventBotany – Hedera helix – highly variable evergreen leaves symbolize eternity and resurrection. Ivy has a distinctive waxy sheen to the upper surface f the leaf. It’s reputed to keep witches away if you grow it up a house wall. Long associated with mid-winter festivals including Christmas because it stays green even in this cold dark season. All leaves in the first photo are from a single plant while each from the second is from a different taxon! Ivy contains falcarinol, a natural fungicide." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 2 – Viscum album | Culham Research Group - http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/crg...
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 2 – Viscum album | Culham Research Group
2014 Botanical Advent Calendar – Day 2 – Viscum album | Culham Research Group
"2nd day of #AdventBotany – Viscum album – another evergreen but this time more sinister. This hemi-parasitic plant grows on a range of broadleaved trees including apple, linden and oak. It has a long tradition in Druidic ritual and the Romans report the harvesting of the species from Quercus (oak) by celtic druids using a golden sickle. This poisonous plant contains the lectin viscumin which is similar to ricin. From the 16th century mistletoe became associated with kissing in some Christian cultures. In the photo below you can see part of the entry on Viscum from Lyte’s ‘A niewe Herball’ published in 1578. This is the oldest book held by University of Reading Herbarium. Viscum album in Lyte's Herball of 1578 Viscum album in Lyte’s Herball of 1578 Among the herbarium specimens of Viscum album we have a collection of correspondence and phtographs from the 1930s when UK botanists seemed keen to find this hemi-parasite on new hosts." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Dormant Sprays for Peach Leaf Curl - Pests in the Urban Landscape - ANR Blogs - http://ucanr.edu/blogs...
Dormant Sprays for Peach Leaf Curl - Pests in the Urban Landscape - ANR Blogs
"Winter is a key time for gardeners to take preventive actions against peach leaf curl in some areas in California. Caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans, peach leaf curl causes distortion, thickening, and reddening of foliage as peach and nectarine trees leaf out in the spring. Damaged leaves often die and drop, but they will be replaced with new, healthier leaves once the weather turns dry and warm. An untreated leaf curl infection will contribute to a tree's decline over several years. To prevent peach leaf curl in areas where the disease occurs, treat susceptible trees with preventive fungicides during the dormant season, ideally in late November or December. A second application should be made in late winter or early spring just before buds swell. In some places, a third treatment may be necessary. Treatment isn't effective if applied after symptoms appear. Removing affected leaves or shoots will not reduce the problem. A few peach varieties are resistant, including Frost,... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
"culticycle Short description: A pedal powered tractor for cultivation and seeding, built from lawn tractor, ATV, and bicycle parts. Speed is 3 - 4 mph depending on choice of gearing and pedaling speed. Better for operator's body, less soil compaction, no fuel use, cheaper than a tractor; easily adaptable to specific needs." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
BBC News - Food crop wild relatives endangered - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Food crop wild relatives endangered
Show all
"Scientists have released the most complete database of the wild relatives of common food crops. These wild relatives are closely related to our crops, but grow naturally under a wide range of environmental conditions. This makes them essential for the development of more resistant and adaptable food sources. However, many of them grow in conflict zones in the Middle East, where their conservation is threatened. Scientists from the University of Birmingham have highlighted "hotspots" around the globe, which are areas where many different types of wild relatives are concentrated. Here, they could be conserved to secure future global food resources. Farmers crossbreed the wild relatives with existing crops to produce varieties of grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes and tubers that are more adaptable to local climates. Lead scientist Dr Nigel Maxted from the University of Birmingham told BBC News: "Our goal is not only crop wild relative conservation, but to promote use of the conserved... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Crassula capitella 'Campfire' | Flickr - Photo Sharing! - https://www.flickr.com/photos...
Crassula capitella 'Campfire' | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Really beautiful display and surprising to see these colors on a Crassula (I may be too inexperienced with Crassulae). - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
The colors tend to change depending on sunlight they receive. Mine are red in the front, but green in the back. I'd rotate, but it's so pretty. - Anika
Spidra Webster
How Climate Change Will End Wine As We Know It - http://www.buzzfeed.com/sandrae...
How Climate Change Will End Wine As We Know It
"“All the grapes were ripening at once,” Wendy Cameron recalls of the harvest that was the wake-up call. Cameron is head winemaker at Brown Brothers, one of Australia’s largest and oldest wine producers. In her 16 years there, Cameron had seen changes — hotter summers, harvest dates inching earlier. While heat waves aren’t unheard of in Australia, the one they had during the late summer of 2008 was unlike anything she’d ever seen: It was over 105 degrees for 10 days straight. You can’t just leave ripe grapes on the vine — their sugars will get too high, yielding wines that are too alcoholic. Too much sun exposure can also affect flavor, and eventually grapes will begin to raisin. Everything had to be harvested at once, Cameron knew, but they only had so many employees. The winery was designed to handle a limited amount of production at a time. They didn’t have enough refrigerators. They didn’t have enough water. (Water prices had tripled over the past year.) Those were taxing,... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Of course, climate change won't only affect people growing wine grapes. It'll change where you can grow other edibles. - Spidra Webster
For those in the UK, buying land in the sarf would be a good investment. It was long England's temperate fruit basket but I think it's going to be your Bordeaux soon. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
UC conservation ag specialist is no-till farming's 'Johnny Appleseed' - ANR News Blog - ANR Blogs - http://ucanr.edu/blogs...
UC conservation ag specialist is no-till farming's 'Johnny Appleseed' - ANR News Blog - ANR Blogs
"The untiring leader of the UC Conservation Agriculture Systems Innovation Center, Jeff Mitchell, was compared to the legendary American farming pioneer Johnny Appleseed by the author of The Grist's Thought for Food blog, Nathanael Johnson. Mitchell, UC Cooperative Extension specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis, took Johnson to research fields and farms to show progress being made toward more sustainable production practices in California row-crop farming. Johnson turned the visit into a 1,300-word feature that included links to conservation agriculture research Mitchell has published in California Agriculture journal. "There's a soil scientist at Berkeley, Garrison Sposito, who says it may be just once or twice in a century that agriculture has an opportunity to re-create itself in a revolutionary way," Mitchell said. "... I think that's what's happening with conservation agriculture. It's energizing for me to wake up to that every day.” Mitchell and his... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
The Plant Health Family of Apps from APS: Turf MD and Tomato MD Now available for Apple AND Android devices! - http://www.apsnet.org/apsstor...
The Plant Health Family of Apps from APS:
Turf MD and Tomato MD

Now available for Apple AND Android devices!
"“Plant Health” is a portal to APS’s new app collection, which includes Turf MD and Tomato MD. These apps offer high-quality, peer-reviewed images, diagnostic keys, tools, tips, and recommendations for the identification and management of various turf and tomato diseases. Turf MD and Tomato MD are available separately for purchase in iPhone/iPad, and Android formats. Just download the Plant Health app for free then purchase access to Turf MD and Tomato MD. Turf MD ($4.99) is an interactive reference tool for the identification and management of turfgrass diseases. Turf MD was designed for golf course superintendents, sports turf managers, turf scientists, extension professionals, and anyone responsible for turfgrass health. It includes a photo gallery, identification tools, decision support tools, an index of turfgrass diseases, and recommendations to help users identify and treat diseases. Specific features include: Peer-reviewed image collections broken into three sections:... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Anika
Korea, Germany cooperate on organic farming - http://www.korea.net/NewsFoc...
Korea, Germany cooperate on organic farming
Korea, Germany cooperate on organic farming
"Two research organizations in Korea and Germany have joined hands to co-develop organic farming projects. The National Academy of Agricultural Science (NAAS), part of the Rural Development Administration (RDA), and the Thünen Institut (TI), a federal research institute in Germany, have signed an MOU on November 14 to cooperate on organic farming. Being under the auspices of the German Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL), the TI is dedicated to studying the scientific development of organic farming. It is comprised of 14 departments, including those focused on species diversity, the climatization of crops and other fields." - Anika from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
North Forty News • Wellington Weekly • Timnath News | USDA designates Fort Collins as climate hub - http://www.northfortynews.com/usda-de...
"Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Feb. 5 the creation of the first ever Regional Hubs for Risk Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change at seven locations around the country, including the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Fort Collins. “Climate Hubs” will address increasing risks such as fires, invasive pests, devastating floods and crippling droughts on a regional basis, aiming to translate science and research into information to farmers, ranchers and forest landowners on ways to adapt and adjust their resource management. “For generations, America’s farmers, ranchers and forest landowners have innovated and adapted to challenges. Today, they face a new and more complex threat in the form of a changing and shifting climate, which impacts both our nation’s forests and our farmers’ bottom lines,” said Vilsack. “USDA’s Climate Hubs are part of our broad commitment to developing the next generation of climate solutions, so that our agricultural leaders have the modern... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
ACP continues to spread across California | Orchard Crops content from Western Farm Press - http://m.westernfarmpress.com/orchard...
ACP continues to spread across California | Orchard Crops content from Western Farm Press
"Probably of keener interest is the “breeding population” discovery of psyllids at two locations in the Bay Area city of San Jose. The San Jose find is far-removed from the rest of the psyllid discoveries in California, which thus far has only been seen in counties several hundred miles south of the Bay Area. The closest discovery of psyllids to San Jose remains San Luis Obispo County on the Central Coast. “The San Jose find may be an introduction through an airport or a hitchhiker that manifested itself into a large population,” said Joel Nelsen, president of the California Citrus Mutual, a commercial trade association. “We just don’t know.” While citrus industry officials concede that southern California psyllid populations are well-established in counties from Los Angeles, southward, it’s the single finds in the southern San Joaquin Valley that raise more questions than answers. “You can make the argument that the Ventura and San Luis Obispo discoveries show a northward progression... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Is that a type of tree hopper? - Halil
Not sure. It sucks the sap of the leaves. The problem is that it is also a host for a bacteria that is killing citrus all over the world. https://cisr.ucr.edu/citrus_... - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Monty Don on Twitter: "Topiary at Levens Hall this morning as seen from Hot air Balloon. http://t.co/hL6zIUWUmg" - https://twitter.com/TheMont...
Monty Don on Twitter: "Topiary at Levens Hall this morning as seen from Hot air Balloon. http://t.co/hL6zIUWUmg"
"Topiary at Levens Hall this morning as seen from Hot air Balloon." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Other ways to read this feed:Feed readerFacebook