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gardening

gardening

all things gardening
JAson FLeming
We ended up making 12 pints of fig preserves this weekend. Mmmmm... This last batch was very lemony and had a strong honey flavor
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You people make me feel so lazy. We've almost finished Borderlands 2, if that counts for anything. - Regular Amanda
If it is any consolation we didn't finish up the pressure washing we needed to do :-) - JAson FLeming from Android
Spidra Webster
"The Plant Family Tree - A Rare Glimpse Inside the Labyrinthine Archive of London’s Royal Botanical Gardens - The Herbarium at London’s Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew is a vast, Victorian maze filled with arcane books, learned scientists, and cabinet after cabinet of cataloged plants. Taking visual cues from the alluring intricacies of a Wes Anderson movie, this elegant short, “The Plant Family Tree,” is the fifth in the series Beyond the Gardens, created by the London-based studio, Lonelyleap. Coinciding with this summer’s IncrEdibles festival that runs through September, the series was designed to expose Kew’s rarely seen research aspect, and uncovers a haven from the hubbub of tourists outside. It tells the story of an institution that has played an integral role in the discovery of new species since it opened in 1853, with seven million specimens held in its many wings. “It’s a fantastic place because of all the history associated with the discovery of immensely diverse plants in... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
JAson FLeming
Fig harvest of 2013
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Going to make preserves and then freeze some to add to a nut brown ale later this year - JAson FLeming from Android
JAson FLeming
The tomato plants were abandoned a month ago are still alive
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Halil
Top London Gardens - Things To Do - visitlondon.com - http://www.visitlondon.com/things-...
Top London Gardens - Things To Do - visitlondon.com
Top London Gardens - Things To Do - visitlondon.com
Top London Gardens - Things To Do - visitlondon.com
Large London Gardens: Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew: 121 hectares (300 acres) housing more than 30,000 types of plant, Kew Gardens has a 250-year history and is a World Heritage site Kensington Palace Gardens: A variety of garden landscapes, including the 19th-century Italian Gardens Hampton Court Palace Gardens: Devised by Henry VIII as a magnificent display of opulence with more than 24 hectares (60 acres) of beautiful gardens Eltham Palace: Seven hectares (19 acres) of original medieval gardens with Art Deco elements Syon House and Gardens: 16 hectares (40 acres) of garden landscaped by the renowned garden innovator Capability Brown, with a spectacular "Great Conservatory" - Halil from Bookmarklet
Smaller London Gardens: Chelsea Physic Garden: Founded in 1673 for the cultivation of medicinal plants, today the garden contains a Garden of World Medicine and a Pharmaceutical Garden The Kyoto Japanese Garden in Holland Park: Created as a "strolling garden" in 1991, plants and pruning techniques are carefully selected and maintained to reflect this style Charlton House Peace Garden:... more... - Halil
Kew garden's entrance fee is £16! :( http://www.kew.org/visit-k... - Halil
http://www.pearlfryar.com/ is free; i watched a documentary about him and his garden the other night and it really inspired and impressed me - chaz2b
Halil
Eglantyne - David Austin Roses - Fragrance : Old Rose Strong - http://www.davidaustinroses.com/english...
Eglantyne - David Austin Roses - Fragrance : Old Rose
Strong
We regard this as one of the most beautiful of the English Roses. The flowers are quite large and of exquisite formation - the petals turning up at the edges to form a shallow saucer filled with small petals. The growth is ideal, being of medium height and bushy, with nice foliage and little disease, making it in every way an excellent garden plant. It is sweetly fragrant - a charming and delicate Old Rose scent. Named after Eglantyne Jebb, the Shropshire woman who founded the ‘Save the Children’ charity fund. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Not to be confused with Rosa rubiginosa (Sweet briar or Eglantine Rose; syn. R. eglanteria) is a species of rose native to Europe and western Asia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... - Halil
Spidra Webster
One of the first fruit trees planted in America is still alive and well at age 383 : TreeHugger - http://www.treehugger.com/natural...
One of the first fruit trees planted in America is still alive and well at age 383 : TreeHugger
One of the first fruit trees planted in America is still alive and well at age 383 : TreeHugger
"When the first European settlers stepped foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620, the landscape they encountered must have felt like the epitome of wildness. In time, of course, cottages and farmhouses, roads and footpaths would sprout up even there as 'civilization' took root. But little could they have guessed, from those fragile early shoots, that the whole wild continent would be tamed in just a few short centuries. It may be hard to believe, however, but one of America's earliest settlers is still alive today -- and still bearing fruit after 383 years. Among the first wave of immigrants to the New World was an English Puritan named John Endicott, who in 1629, arrived to serve as the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Charged with the task of establishing a welcoming setting for new arrivals upon the untamed land, the Pilgrim leader set about making the area around modern-day Salem as homey as possible. In approximately 1630, as his children watched on, Endicott planted one of... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
unlike us in the UK, chopping down original orchards to redevelop into housing estates :( yes we need homes, but not at the cost of green spaces!!! - Halil
Unfortunately, plenty of that has happened here, too. (I forgot to note that the headline is misleading. One of the first fruit trees known to have been planted by European colonists is more accurate. There are some indigenous cultures that practiced agriculture in what is now the US but I don't know if they cultivated fruit trees per se.) - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Cuts Science Staff Weeks After Native Garden Debut - Prospect Heights - DNAinfo.com New York - http://www.dnainfo.com/new-yor...
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Cuts Science Staff Weeks After Native Garden Debut - Prospect Heights - DNAinfo.com New York
"PROSPECT HEIGHTS — It's pruning season at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden — one of the borough's oldest cultural institutions has uprooted its founding department, DNAinfo New York has learned. In the midst of a years-long capital improvement project and just weeks after expanding its flagship Native Flora Garden, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden has cut its entire science department, as well as a liaison to community gardens, and will soon be suspending its field research and shuttering its science center, according to an email obtained by DNAinfo. "Despite the successes achieved in the Garden’s most recent fiscal year ending June 30th, BBG faced significant challenges in planning the FY14 budget because of increased insurance and employee-benefits expenses, among others," Garden President Scot Medbury told staff in an email obtained by DNAinfo. "The Garden faced a shortfall that could not be fully addressed by increasing revenue targets or reducing non-personnel costs." The publicly-funded... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Save Rosie's Vegetable Garden | Kitchen Gardeners International | causes.com - http://www.causes.com/save-ro...
Save Rosie's Vegetable Garden | Kitchen Gardeners International | causes.com
"Rosie is a vibrant 4-year old girl living with her single, severely-disabled mom in a subsidized housing unit in rural South Dakota. In May 2013, Rosie's mother, Mary, converted a small unused area outside their apartment into a vegetable garden. Although the garden is compact, it produces a variety of healthy greens which Rosie and Mary could otherwise not easily afford on their fixed income ($628/month in disability payments) while also providing a safe play area for Rosie just outside her own backdoor. Now their property management company has ordered that the garden be removed this week saying that it goes against the rules set by USDA's Rural Development Agency which doesn't allow residents to have structures of any sort in landscaped areas. Please join us in sending the message that everyone deserves to have access to gardens and healthy food, especially the most vulnerable people in society.... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Unfortunately, Causes requires Facebook login to sign the petition, which is also bullshit. But it gives you info so you can email the USDA yourself if you wish. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Wild Peas are Edible | Hunter Angler Gardener Cook - http://honest-food.net/2013...
Wild Peas are Edible | Hunter Angler Gardener Cook
Wild Peas are Edible | Hunter Angler Gardener Cook
"I could tell she was coming for a fight. I’d been talking to a reader at a book event at the time, and I couldn’t help but notice the middle-aged woman standing behind the guy I was chatting with. She appeared to be wearing some sort of hand-knit shawl, had a bandanna on her head and had decorated her blouse with several buttons sporting some sort of slogan or another on her chest. She practically oozed umbrage as she fidgeted, waiting to talk with me. The gentleman bid his adieu and I turned to the nice lady, smiling. She never even let me get in a “hello.” How can you POSSIBLY get away with telling people that wild peas are edible? They are HIGHLY poisonous, and EVERYBODY knows it! I finished with my hello. “Well, ma’am,” — and yes, I absolutely did “ma’am” her — “I’m not sure where you heard this, but wild peas are most certainly not toxic. In fact, I’ve been eating them my whole life.” She began rambling on and on about neurotoxins and cancer and God-knows-what-else. I let her... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
You can't go to town on them but you can eat them a bit. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Understanding AHS Heat Zones Versus USDA Hardiness Zones | Horticulture - http://www.hortmag.com/weekly-...
Understanding AHS Heat Zones Versus USDA Hardiness Zones | Horticulture
"Many gardeners have heard of or have read about USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) Zones when scanning the aisles of garden centers, reading articles on the latest plants or when deciding what plants to add into their garden. However, AHS (American Horticulture Society) Plant Heat Zones are also imperative to the gardener, though their importance can sometimes be overlooked. While USDA Zones help measure the cold our plants can endure—that is, if they will survive during the local winter—AHS Heat Zones help to measure the “heat tolerance” of our plants. So to answer your question simply, AHS Zones track heat patterns while USDA Zones track cold hardiness. USDA Zones are divided into sections based on the average annual minimum temperature with zones ranging from Zone 1a (-60 to -50 degrees F) to Zone 13b (65 to 70 degrees F). They are divided into 10 degree F zones that are then split into two sections of 5 degrees (a and b). Example: Zone 2a (the annual minimum... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Halil
Myddelton House Gardens - Edward Augustus Bowles, one of Britain’s most famous self-taught gardeners, artists and expert botanists. - http://www.flickr.com/photos...
Myddelton House Gardens - Edward Augustus Bowles, one of Britain’s most famous self-taught gardeners, artists and expert botanists.
Edward Augustus (Gus or Gussie) Bowles, VMH (14 May 1865 – 7 May 1954), known professionally as E. A. Bowles, was a British horticulturalist,[1] plantsman and garden writer.[2] He developed an important garden at Myddelton House, his lifelong home at Bulls Cross in Enfield, Middlesex and his name has been preserved in many varieties of plant. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... - Halil from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Texas Police Hit Organic Farm With Massive SWAT Raid - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013...
Texas Police Hit Organic Farm With Massive SWAT Raid
"A small organic farm in Arlington, Texas, was the target of a massive police action last week that included aerial surveillance, a SWAT raid and a 10-hour search. Members of the local police raiding party had a search warrant for marijuana plants, which they failed to find at the Garden of Eden farm. But farm owners and residents who live on the property told a Dallas-Ft. Worth NBC station that the real reason for the law enforcement exercise appears to have been code enforcement. The police seized "17 blackberry bushes, 15 okra plants, 14 tomatillo plants ... native grasses and sunflowers," after holding residents inside at gunpoint for at least a half-hour, property owner Shellie Smith said in a statement. The raid lasted about 10 hours, she said. Local authorities had cited the Garden of Eden in recent weeks for code violations, including "grass that was too tall, bushes growing too close to the street, a couch and piano in the yard, chopped wood that was not properly stacked, a... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
just fucking lovely. - Big Joe Silence
Good god, not improperly stacked wood! - Heather, 30k Camper
I can understand neighbors being upset if a couch and piano are outdoors in all sorts of weather with no shelter. They could harbor vermin. But no code violation is deserving of a SWAT visit. I can only guess some asshole neighbor said they were growing pot (*still* not worthy of a SWAT visit). - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Gardening for Geeks: DIY Tests, Gadgets, and Techniques That Utilize Microbiology, Mathematics, and Ecology to Exponentially Maximize the Yield of Your Garden: Christy Wilhelmi - http://www.amazon.com/Gardeni...
Gardening for Geeks: DIY Tests, Gadgets, and Techniques That Utilize Microbiology, Mathematics, and Ecology to Exponentially Maximize the Yield of Your Garden: Christy Wilhelmi
"There is much more to gardening than what you've learned in school. With Gardening for Geeks, you'll examine your ecosystem and discover how you can create the right environment for your plants. From analyzing meteorological patterns in order to plan productive beds to experimenting with the carbon and nitrogen levels in your soil, this book will teach you all about the developments and chemical reactions that occur at each phase of growth and how you can alter your planting techniques to construct the most thriving, productive garden possible. Each chapter also utilizes a wide range of inexpensive tests, gadgets, and methods that you can use to help evaluate, monitor, and enhance your plot. Complete with troubleshooting solutions and useful charts and graphs, Gardening for Geeks has everything you need to establish a beautiful and sustainable vegetable patch--one microclimate at a time!" - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Saw this at the gift shop at the Huntington today. Wish I'd thought to thumb through it. I think a book on the science/s behind gardening that's aimed at laypeople is much needed. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Council seeks to suspend rules against sidewalk vegetable gardens - latimes.com - http://www.latimes.com/local...
Council seeks to suspend rules against sidewalk vegetable gardens - latimes.com
"Los Angeles residents who grow fruits and vegetables near their front curb will get a respite from the city's code enforcement officials, under a measure approved Tuesday by the City Council. The council voted unanimously to ask city agencies to temporarily suspend rules that restrict the cultivation of gardens in the parkway, the area between the sidewalk and the curb. While enforcement is suspended, city officials will continue to work on new rules governing parkway landscaping, said Council President Herb Wesson. "What we need is a little more time to try to sort out how we can do this," said Wesson, who proposed the suspension. As a result, some gardeners have received notices instructing them to remove raised beds, tall fruit trees or lush vegetable gardens. The city's municipal code requires parkways to remain free from obstructions to allow pedestrians to pass, according to Wesson's proposal. Tuesday's vote was welcomed by Los Feliz resident Abbie Zands, who said he received... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
▶ Fraxinus: a Facebook game to crowdsource the fight against ash dieback disease HD - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
▶ Fraxinus: a Facebook game to crowdsource the fight against ash dieback disease HD - YouTube
Play
"Let scientists keep the lab coat, goggles and pipette. Playing a Facebook game as simple as Candy Crush is enough to take part in active research to help save the ash tree. In December 2012, scientists from The Sainsbury Laboratory hired Sheffield-based gaming company Team Cooper to develop 'Fraxinus'. The game uses real genetic data from the fungus which causes Chalara ash dieback and from the common ash, Fraxinus excelsior. It involves matching and rearranging patterns of coloured leaf shapes which represent nucleotides - the letters that make up a genome sequence. People are better at this than computers alone, because the human eye can recognise patterns that computers miss. The Facebook game is part of a rapid response to ask dieback funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), which includes understanding more about the disease, how it attacks ash trees, finding natural resistance and predicting and mitigating disease progression. Fraxinus game: http://apps.facebook.com/fraxinu... OpenAshDieback site: http://oadb.tsl.ac.uk/" - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
It's a pretty cool idea. Any gamers here know of other games that make a game out of crowdsourcing solutions? - Spidra Webster
There are actually quite a few, but probably the most famous are the 'fold' games (http://fold.it/portal...) since they've had a few breakthroughs over time. Generally, I think it is a great idea - there are people who love puzzles, and if they're framed correctly, they don't need a bunch of institutional knowledge to lend a hand. - Jennifer Dittrich
That's cool. Not that there shouldn't be play for play's sake but given how many days at a time people spend gaming, it'd be very cool if some scientific puzzles could be solved at the same time. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Getting to the Bottom of the Peacotum | CUESA - http://www.cuesa.org/article...
Getting to the Bottom of the Peacotum | CUESA
Getting to the Bottom of the Peacotum | CUESA
"Once upon a time, there were cherries in the spring, followed by apricots, nectarines, peaches, and plums in the summer, spilling over into fall. Our choices were simple, or so they seemed. Today, stone fruit season brings all of the above and everything in between in a rainbow of colors and flavors: apriums, pluots, nectaplums, peacharines, pluerries, and even peacotums. Where did these designer breeds come from? In the age of genetic engineering, the term “hybrid” can raise eyebrows and concerns for eaters. Blossom Bluff Orchards, an organic fruit farm based in Parlier, is one of a number of Ferry Plaza sellers who grow pluots and other modern hybrids. “We get a lot of questions at the stand,” says fourth-generation farmer Bryce Loewen. “I think it’s great that people are thinking about GMOs. They’re worried about that stuff, and rightly so in my opinion.” Family Trees Hybridization is nothing new, nor was it invented by humans. For thousands of years, new plant varieties have... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Posters / RHS Campaign for School Gardening - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/schoolg...
Posters / RHS Campaign for School Gardening
"Cuttings Poster: A bright and informative poster on taking cuttings. It's cheap, it's easy and it need no expensive equipment. Download Cuttings Poster (2776.0KB, .pdf) Wildlife Poster: A colourful poster showing what jobs to do in your school garden through the four seasons and wildlife to look out for. Download Wildlife Poster (712.3KB, .pdf) Seed Dispersal Posters: A set of four beautifully designed posters illustrating the different methods of seed dispersal. Including animal, water, wind, fire and self methods of dispersal. Download Seed Dispersal posters (761.6KB, .pdf) Kate's Kitchen Garden Planner: A vibrant month by month poster guiding you on what to do in your school garden as well as information on harvesting, sowing and planting each month. A pdf version is available here Download Kitchen Garden Planner (1413.7KB, .pdf) The Origins of Fruit and Vegetables Download a copy of our poster illustrating where in the world your fruit and vegetables originally came from.... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
The link to the Linnean Society posters at the bottom gives a 404 but I was able to find them here: http://www.linnean.org/Educati... - Spidra Webster
JAson FLeming
Tiny bell pepper growing. This is the first one from the pallet garden we started earlier this year
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Should I fertilize it as it bears fruit? - JAson FLeming from Android
Spidra Webster
"With all the charm that shone through My Life on a Hillside Allotment, Terry takes the gardening reader by the hand and leads them through the gardening year. He is the perfect companion, giving technical help, quick tips, reassurance, and plenty of entertainment along the way. Life on the allotment month-by-month with this much-loved Radio 2 gardener’s best tips for vegetable-gardening success. From a gardener who has been working on his allotment for over 50 years, a brilliant guide to organic vegetable growing and allotment life in general." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
My friend Terry's book is coming out in October and would be of use to folks in the UK. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Twitter / plantdisease: Plant Pathologist sighting ... - https://twitter.com/plantdi...
Twitter / plantdisease: Plant Pathologist sighting ...
"Plant Pathologist sighting in Austin before #APS2013! pic.twitter.com/21O86J4lgI" Love that shirt! - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Katy S
YAY!!!!!!!
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Congrats! - Spidra Webster
Thanks! The shade of yellow pleases me. - Katy S
beautiful! - RudĩϐЯaЯïan
I can't wait until I can serve these with my black krims and the orange oxhearts. - Katy S
Spidra Webster
Victory for garden doesn't mean City Hall common sense grows on trees - latimes.com - http://www.latimes.com/news...
Victory for garden doesn't mean City Hall common sense grows on trees - latimes.com
"In a rare but perhaps fleeting triumph of clear-headed thinking at Los Angeles City Hall, high-level officials have rescinded a citation issued to a South L.A. family for the crime of planting squash in their frontyard. On the evening of my Wednesday column about Angel and Carl Teger's vegetable garden, two members of City Councilman Bernard Parks' staff visited the scene of the crime and reported back to their boss. Parks then fired off a letter to Ron Lorenzen, assistant chief of the city's Bureau of Urban Forestry. "We are requesting a hold on the citation," wrote Parks, noting that a motion to review the city's gardening policy — introduced by Council President Herb Wesson — has languished. Bio | E-mail | Recent columns Steve Lopez: L.A. still saying parkway vegetable gardens must go Steve Lopez: For police, the goal is vigilance, not vigilantes Steve Lopez: Firehouse chefs invited to don their toques again And indeed it has, dating back to my column two years ago on another... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
End of Summer Sale: 50% off Books : Chelsea Green - http://www.chelseagreen.com/content...
End of Summer Sale: 50% off Books : Chelsea Green
"Now through Labor Day we’re having an end of summer warehouse sale to make room for our forthcoming fall releases. We’re offering four chances to save big—up to 90% off—on some of our new and bestselling books, as well as old favorites. All of our New & Bestselling titles are 25% off with the discount code SUMMER at checkout. Then, we have some amazing WAREHOUSE CLEARANCE DEALS on selected titles: Deep discounts at 50% Off, Deeper discounts at 75% Off, Deepest discounts at 90% Off. All titles below are on sale for 50% off! You can see more discounts for our 75% off sale books here and 90% off sale books here. All our regularly priced titles are 25% off with the discount code SUMMER at checkout. And, as always, shipping is free on orders more than $100. Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. Sale runs through Labor Day (Monday September 2nd)." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Sale prices are lower than Amazon. Only on paper books. They have a number of extremely good gardening titles. - Spidra Webster
Danger, danger. - Greg GuitarBuster
Yeah, I did worry about you being tempted beyond your means. - Spidra Webster
Oh, you're not so evil :) We have some extra income now. I could still get carried away, but I won't. My wishlist might earn me free shipping (They have 75% and 90% off lists too) - Greg GuitarBuster
Spidra Webster
Weed Dating: Where Weeds (And Daters) Meet Their Match | GrowingProduce | Article - http://www.growingproduce.com/article...
Weed Dating: Where Weeds (And Daters) Meet Their Match | GrowingProduce | Article
"For some singles, dating can seem like an endless walk among the weeds. An increasingly-popular event on farms, weed dating, is putting that metaphor literally to work. Weed dating is an event where singles come to a farm and meet other singles, all while weeding in a designated bed (insert your own pun). Weed dating as an event originated in Vermont on an organic farm, and it has spread all over the country, well, like weeds. Farms in Idaho, Kentucky, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, California, and Texas have hosted these agricultural events. Although there is a romantic element to weed dating, farms see hosting this type of an event as a way to shed light on agriculture. “We encouraged the people to come out, not just for dates, but also to find other ‘agri-curious folk’ like us — people who are really curious about agriculture,” said Esther Kim, marketing manager of EarthDance Farms an organic farm in Ferguson, MO. Erin Flynn, founder of Green Gate Farms an organic operation in... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Meet the 112th | Camarillo mango expert plans to patent 10 varieties designed to thrive in Ventura County - http://www.meetthe112th.com/latest-...
Meet the 112th | Camarillo mango expert plans to patent 10 varieties designed to thrive in Ventura County
"Mangoes grow in protected microclimates in Ventura County, but the tropical fruit isn’t common here and won’t, as a rule, survive our winters. Until now, according to Camarillo mango expert Tim Thompson. The self-proclaimed “mango professor” is submitting patent applications for 10 new mango varieties that Thompson says will grow widely — possibly commercially — in Ventura County. “My work was to develop new mango varieties for not only backyard gardeners, but for the California agricultural industry,” he said. Thompson, 70, who is a real estate broker by profession, spent the last 30 years in the trial-and-error process of developing frost- and mildew-tolerant mango varieties hardy enough to grow in most of Ventura County. “If we can expand up into Ventura (County), an area where the mango has not generally grown, it is indeed a very significant thing,” said international mango expert Dr. Richard Campbell, director of horticulture at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens in Coral... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Has the Asian Citrus Psyllid Parasitoid, Tamarixia radiata, Established in California? - CISR Blog - http://cisr.ucr.edu/blog...
Has the Asian Citrus Psyllid Parasitoid, Tamarixia radiata, Established in California? - CISR Blog
"The Problem: Tamarixia radiata, a tiny parasitic wasp has been imported into California from the Punjab of Pakistan to attack nymphs of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a serious citrus pest that has established wide spread populations in the counties of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside (significantly smaller populations are known in Imperial and San Diego Counties too). Releases of Tamarixia commenced in December 2011 after USDA-APHIS cleared this natural enemy for release from the Quarantine Facility at the University of California Riverside. Since these initial releases in December, approximately 8,500 parasitoids have been released at about 50 different sites in Southern California by July 2012. The Biocontrol Release Program: Parasitoid releases have been made in the cities of Azusa, Bell Gardens, Chino, Duarte, Fontana, Los Angeles, Mira Loma, Montclair, Ontario, Pico Rivera, Pomona, Rialto, Riverside, San Bernardino and Whittier. In these areas, citrus in residential... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
SLOW FLOWERS Podcast: Farm-to-Table; Field-to-Vase Panel Discussion (Episode 101) - http://www.debraprinzing.com/2013...
SLOW FLOWERS Podcast: Farm-to-Table; Field-to-Vase Panel Discussion (Episode 101)
"Welcome to Episode 101 of the new SLOW FLOWERS Podcast. The audio featured here is from the July 19, 2013 panel discussion at the California Association of Flower Growers & Shippers (NORCAL) conference, moderated by Kasey Cronquist, CEO/Ambassador of the California Cut Flower Commission. Panelists included Kathy Brenzel, garden editor at Sunset Magazine; Christina Stembel, founder of Farmgirl Flowers, and me. The audience Q&A that followed our presentation was difficult to hear due to the limited number of microphones in the room, so here is the edited transcript of those questions and our panel’s answers. Q&A following Field-to-Vase Panel discussion: Kasey Cronquist : I hope you all have a sense of how special this group is in context of this industry. This is certainly a trend, or as Debra says, “a cultural shift,” that we’re excited about. It’s a special time because you’re not necessarily going to hear a program like this or have the chance to hear from speakers like this subject... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
I post this in gardening simply because I know of no more general FF group for agriculture and plant issues. Like food farming, cut flower growing has a lot of the same issues with sustainability, air miles, jobs, quality... - Spidra Webster
JAson FLeming
Baby fig tree seems to be doing well
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JAson FLeming
Hoping to plan a return trip here timed so that we can harvest these now baby figs
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