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David Semeria › Comments

David Semeria
Re: The Pro-Rata Participation Right - http://avc.com/2014...
"However, the pro-rata right can create problems when you need to chase down lots of small shareholders to get their signatures. The legal docs should be structured so that no shareholder can hold the round to ransom." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: The Pro-Rata Participation Right - http://avc.com/2014...
"That's why capital raises are frequently referred to as "rights issues". Where the right in question is to participate." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Homeschool Wednesday: Wolfram Alpha - http://continuations.com/post...
"My favorite WA query How can you not love that?" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Tech Tuesday: Halting Problem (Implications) - http://continuations.com/post...
"True, but you also have to consider another interesting topic in computer science: the boundary between code and data. Is the following input for a user name code or data? David; drop table users;" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Tech Tuesday: Halting Problem (Implications) - http://continuations.com/post...
"That's a great answer Allbert, and of course you're right: there really isn't much difference between an unimaginably large finite number and infinity itself. The point I was making is that since theoretical computing makes use of infinities, computation time cannot be used to decide whether a program is stuck in an infinite loop or not (because a program could simply be busy doing something that will take an infinitely long time to complete). As you know, in everyday computing the halting problem is rarely relevant because programmers generally use some measure of progress (time or iterations, for example) to decide whether a program is stuck or not. But I digress - your post was about computing theory and I'm talking about computing practice. I agree entirely that theoretical computing (with all of its philosophical and number theory undertones) is indeed a fascinating and elegant subject. Modern computers make brute force approaches ever more practical, but it's still brute force...." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Tech Tuesday: Halting Problem (Implications) - http://continuations.com/post...
"I missed the original post on Turing Machines, so I'll make the general point here: There is a big difference between mathematical and computational theory and real life. In essence this boils down to the fact that sooner or a later you'll see a ∞ symbol somewhere in the proof. Whether it's the length of a TM's tape, or how big the set of all integers is, for example. Clearly in real life infinity is just a concept - you can't actually build a real Turing Machine. So while in theory it's not possible to work out whether a given program will ever a execute line 42 - in practice, if you have have enough time and resources, it is. You just need to run the program for every possible combination of input data and see if it ever hits line 42. Obviously, if the combination of all possible inputs is itself infinite then we're back at square one and the laws of uncomputability win. Even in the recent past, computers were slow enough that even modest such brute force approaches would take years..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Opposing View Reader (Update) - http://continuations.com/post...
"NLP is already hard and sentiment analysis is - in my view - even harder. For example, I've yet to find an algorithm that can understand sarcasm. Then again, just because a problem is hard doesn't mean it's impossible. This is certainly one of the most interesting areas of CS research." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Opposing View Reader (Update) - http://continuations.com/post...
"Exactly Carl. The key point being that you can't "not like" something." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Opposing View Reader (Update) - http://continuations.com/post...
"This is a much harder problem than it seems at first sight. Using standard clustering algorithms it's actually much easier to find people who have things in common than those who don't. If we both like "The Godfather", "Goodfellas" and "Carlitto's Way", it's likely we share similar views on gangster movies. But if a third person watched "The Godfather" and didn't like it then it's unlikely they went on to watch the other two - and so the data is missing is for those films. And that's the root of the problem, we tend to leave a trail of things we like, but not of thing we don't." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: My Idiosyncratic View Of The World - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Fred, time for a response in kind: if (user == "jeff wise"){ alert("plonker"); }" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Homeschool Wednesday: Even More Math and Beauty - http://continuations.com/post...
"I had a quick look at the Wikipedia page on Cantor's diagonalization proof and was surprised to see a few references to the Russell Paradox. I have a pet theory regarding the Russell paradox in which I posit that it's not really a paradox at all. My 'proof' involves doorbells and can only be properly explained over a beer..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Homeschool Wednesday: Even More Math and Beauty - http://continuations.com/post...
"Great point. Did you ever get involved with theories regarding different sized infinities? I tried, but my brain went on strike." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Homeschool Wednesday: Even More Math and Beauty - http://continuations.com/post...
"I love asking people whether it's possible to a have a finite area bounded by an infinitely long perimeter. They regularly say no, at which point I say welcome to the Koch Snowflake! http://www.oxfordmathcenter.co..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: What am I Thankful for This Year? - http://www.bothsidesofthetable.com/2013...
"And I'm looking forward to thanking *you* this time next year Mark :)" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Crowdfunding More Public School Chess - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Agreed that chess brings many benefits but - thankfully - I don't expect we'll see yesterday's enthralling debate about how helpful it is in getting people laid." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Homeschool Wednesday: Higher Ed - http://continuations.com/post...
"Whilst I agree with the overall thrust of your argument, I believe to miss out some key points regarding the 'physical' university experience: - social (many of my best friends I met a college) - pressure (once a year we had to take 10 exams in a single week, non negotiable) - strategy (with limited time to prepare an exam, go broad or go deep?) - efficiency (I'm convinced a good university merely teaches you how to learn by yourself) I expect you will counter that many, if not all, of these aspects can be replicated virtually. But I'm not so sure. For example, I've have doubts regarding how tests can be effectively policed on line -- I certainly would have got a few extra marks if I could have had access to search engines during exams! I'm certainly not against online education, but I think it's important not to sell it as a simple drop in replacement for the current system." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Video Of The Week: Ben Milne on TWIST - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"The Dwolla web site should make it clear on the home page that the service is currently only for US users. It's annoying to find out at step 3 of the sign-up process." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Fun Feature Friday: Embeddable Media In The Comments - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Totally cool!" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Fun Feature Friday: Embeddable Media In The Comments - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Here's one from a recent post by Albert Wenger http://media.tumblr.com/3c1b2c..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
"There is not much to be gleaned from the Human Dx web site... Past attempts at medical diagnosis have taken a rule-based approach, but reading between the lines of the USV post hints at adaptive machine learning. It will be interesting to see what lies behind the veil... Which leads me onto a very interesting point (at least for me) - this seems like a project with has yet to launch and therefore - one can only speculate - has limited traction. VCs are famous for accelerating things which are already moving (cf Mark Suster's Rocket Fuel post) - is this an exception to the rule, or have the rules changed?" - David Semeria
David Semeria
"That's so full of win. Go for it William! Obviously none of the above is any way influenced by your 'electrocuted' comment :)" - David Semeria
David Semeria
"Sister Anne de Beaupre sure left a lasting impression on you JLM. If I win the prize for the best AVC hair, sister Anne surely wins it for AVC Latin citations!" - David Semeria
David Semeria
":) It's getting wilder as I get older. It must be something to do with recapturing the Halcyon days..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
"Wow, I remember reading the original post. Time really has flown..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Video Of The Week: William's Interview of My Partner Albert - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"I suspected there was a rational explanation, there always is..." - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Video Of The Week: William's Interview of My Partner Albert - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Albert shared many insights in this talk (very ably prompted by William, I might add) but my favorite was the unbundling thesis. The comparison between newspaper topic bundling (owing to print and distribution overheads) and university course bundling (owing to the necessity of physical presence) was supremely enlightening. Chapeau!" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Video Of The Week: William's Interview of My Partner Albert - http://www.avc.com/a_vc...
"Who were the contingent from Mars? Is that a conference first :)" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Tech Tuesday: Languages and Automata - http://continuations.com/post...
"I was thinking about this post on way home from work. Whilst it's true that your first grammar (a*ba*) can be represented by a FSM, it's also true that this grammar can also generate infinitely long strings. So technically my explanation for a Turing Machine being necessary for parsing a palindrome appears to be incorrect. It now seems to me what counts is the maximum number of states the parser can find itself in (finite for the above grammar, but infinite in the case of palindromes). Is this reasoning correct Albert?" - David Semeria
David Semeria
Re: Tech Tuesday: Languages and Automata - http://continuations.com/post...
"It's years since I did this stuff, but based on your post my stab at the palindrome grammar would be: S -> aSa S -> bSb S -> e I'm not sure if 'aba' is a palindrome ('b' is part of both 'sides') - but if it is, then I would add the following rules: S -> a S -> b" - David Semeria
David Semeria
"I added the exits before 2003 section to prevent people from continually having to look-up founding dates for names which seem more recent than they are (for example, who'd have thought OpenTable was founded as far back a 1998? ) Once the document is locked down, though, I agree they should be removed." - David Semeria
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