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درویش پارسی
Every minute I was there, I wanted to flee. I did not want to see this. Would I cut and run, or would I deal with the responsibility of being there with camera?
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Why photograph war? Is it possible to put an end to a form of human behavior which has existed throughout history by means of photography? The proportions of that notion seem ridiculously out of balance. Yet, that very idea has motivated me. For me, the strength of photography lies in its ability to evoke a sense of humanity. If war is an attempt to negate humanity, then photography can be perceived as the opposite of war and if it is used well it can be a powerful ingredient in the antidote to war. In a way, if an individual assumes the risk of placing himself in the middle of a war in order to communicate to the rest of the world what is happening, he is trying to negotiate for peace. Perhaps that is the reason why those in charge of perpetuating a war do not like to have photographers around. In the field where your experience is extremely immediate, what you see is not an image in the page of a magazine ten thousand miles away with the advertisements for Rolex watches on the next... more... - درویش پارسی
Amira
Hidden sheet music in Hieronymus Bosch triptych recorded by blogger | Art and design | The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/artandd...
Hidden sheet music in Hieronymus Bosch triptych recorded by blogger | Art and design | The Guardian
Hidden sheet music in Hieronymus Bosch triptych recorded by blogger | Art and design | The Guardian
"An enterprising blogger has recorded a piece of music hidden in Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights, bringing to life a series of notes that originally appeared on the backside of one of Bosch’s sinners. Posting on her Tumblr, a self-described “huge nerd” called Amelia explained that she and a friend had been examining a copy of Bosch’s famous triptych, which was painted around the year 1500. “[We] discovered, much to our amusement,” she wrote. “[a] 600-years-old butt song from Hell.” Once zoomed-in, the object of Amelia’s interest is clear: Bosch left sheet music “written upon the posterior of one of the many tortured denizens of the rightmost panel of the painting”. (...) While music and musical instruments are major motifs of his masterwork, which has long been on display in Madrid, these are often interpreted as symbols of pleasure, lust or the notoriously naughty habits of travelling minstrels." - Amira from Bookmarklet
does it sound like the Dead Can Dance version? - Adriano
Amira
Beethoven String Quartet Op. 131 No. 14 played by Brentano String Quartet - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Beethoven String Quartet Op. 131 No. 14 played by Brentano String Quartet
Play
"Grammy nomination for 'Best engineered album (Classical)' Original Sountrack Excerpt of ' A Late Quartet' with Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christopher Walken and Catherine Keener. Brentano String Quartet: Mark Steinberg, Serena Canin (violins) Misha Amory (viola) Nina Maria Lee (cello) Founded in 1992, the New York-based Brentano Quartet is known for its interpretations combining perfect technique and matchless musicality. Those qualities are even more obvious in this series of late Beethoven quartets with this first volume bringing together the Op. 127 and 131. This pure crystal of intelligence and brilliance will doubtless constitute a milestone." - Amira from Bookmarklet
Victor Ganata
Wait, what? 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + … = -1/12? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... See, this is why I stopped taking math classes after I barely passed integral calculus.
"The divergent series are the invention of the devil, and it is a shame to base on them any demonstration whatsoever." Niels Henrik Abel - Greg GuitarBuster
That's my homeboy :) - Eivind from Android
Ramanujan! - Ken Morley
Adriano
Claude MONET :: Les Nymphéas . [Musée de l'Orangerie, Paris]
monet-nympheas-orangerie-ARC.jpg
Image retouched and color-corrected (click on it to enlarge). One of my favorite rooms in the world :-) - Adriano
this is a rare treat: Monet photographed painting water lilies on giant canvas, http://ff.im/1dyzVh - Adriano
Amira
The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science by Bernard Chazelle | Princeton University - http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~chazel...
The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science by Bernard Chazelle | Princeton University
The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science by Bernard Chazelle | Princeton University
“The Algorithm's coming-of-age as the new language of science promises to be the most disruptive scientific development since quantum mechanics. (...) Computer is a storyteller and algorithms are its tales. (...) Computing is the meeting point of three powerful concepts: universality, duality, and self-reference. In the modern era, this triumvirate has bowed to the class-conscious influence of the tractability creed. The creed's incessant call to complexity class warfare has, in turn, led to the emergence of that ultimate class leveler: the Algorithm. Today, not only is this new “order” empowering the e-technology that stealthily rules our lives; it is also challenging what we mean by knowing, believing, trusting, persuading, and learning. No less. Some say the Algorithm is poised to become the new New Math, the idiom of modern science." - Amira from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Eurozine - The Mediterranean: Room without a view - Jurica Pavicic - http://www.eurozine.com/article...
Eurozine - The Mediterranean: Room without a view - Jurica Pavicic
"The mythical Mediterranean of the tourist imagination masks a reality of debt, stagnation and social decline. Yet the region colludes in its own downfall, writes Jurica Pavicic, trading in former glories while acquiescing to political and economic exploitation." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"n a famous scene in E. M. Forster's novel, A Room With a View, its heroine – Lucy Honeychurch, a young Englishwoman – is touring Tuscany in a horse-drawn carriage. En route, the dark-haired young Italian coachman stops to pick up a girl, whom he introduces as his sister. Shortly afterwards, the alleged brother and sister start kissing passionately. The demure Edwardian maiden, with her strict moral code, is horrified and at the same time confused by the stirring of her erotic feelings." - Maitani
"The scene, faithfully filmed in James Ivory and Ismail Merchant's screen version, illustrates well how northern Europe has seen the Mediterranean over the last century-and-a-half. To northern Europeans, the Mediterranean is a place that exists in happy indiscipline, at ease with carnality, impulsiveness and desire. In other words, a place where northern Europeans seek happiness. And they seek it in the metaphor that serves Forster for his title: a room with a view." - Maitani
"Literally, this is a room with a view in a tourist hotel or a private apartment. It's the window for which you have paid a 7 per cent surcharge for a week's board, a window facing the longed-for sun of the south, the window from which you expect to see the local splendours: the open sea, a chain of islands, the roofs of the centro storico or kasaba, or – in Forster's case – the dome of Bernini's celebrated cathedral." - Maitani
Maitani
OUPblog » Blog Archive » An etymologist among the gods - http://blog.oup.com/2012...
OUPblog » Blog Archive » An etymologist among the gods
"Etymology, a subject rarely studied on our campuses, enjoys the respect of many people, even though they persist in calling it entomology. Human beings always want to know the origin of things, but sometimes etymology is made to carry double, like the horse in O. Henry’s story “The Roads We Take.” For instance, it is sometimes said that etymology helps us to use words correctly. Alas, it very seldom does so. If someone asks us about the meaning of the adjective debonair and is not only informed that a debonair man is genial, suave, and so forth but also that the adjective goes back to the French phrase de bon aire “of good disposition (nature),” this may help. But learning that the Gothic cognate of Engl. mad means “crippled” or that the historical sense of Engl. budget is “a small (leather) bag” will only confuse the speaker. Even in learning to spell etymology is rarely of service. Tuesday has ue, sleuth has eu, tube feels perfectly at ease with u, two end in wo, too is fine with... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Of special interest is the meaning of divine names. Germanic myths that at one time had circulation outside Scandinavia are lost, but medieval Iceland preserved numerous tales of the pagan gods whom people venerated before their conversion to Christianity. A study of their ancient faith reveals a lost world of beliefs and superstitions. The role of etymology in the reconstruction of... more... - Maitani
"Yet in the preserved corpus of Scandinavian myths Thor had nothing to do with thunder" Uh, he was the thunder god. That's pretty explicit in the myths I learned about as a child. It was probably the first thing I knew about him. - Eivind
Entomology is awesome, though :-P - Eivind
Adriano
Freeman DYSON :: Note on Wittgenstein . ["Philosophers became insignificant when philosophy became a separate academic discipline, distinct from science and history and literature and religion."] - http://www.nybooks.com/article...
Freeman DYSON :: Note on Wittgenstein . ["Philosophers became insignificant when philosophy became a separate academic discipline, distinct from science and history and literature and religion."]
"When I arrived at Cambridge University in 1946, Wittgenstein had just returned from his six years of duty at the hospital. I held him in the highest respect and was delighted to find him living in a room above mine on the same staircase. I frequently met him walking up or down the stairs, but I was too shy to start a conversation. Several times I heard him muttering to himself: “I get stupider and stupider every day.” Finally, toward the end of my time in Cambridge, I ventured to speak to him. I told him I had enjoyed reading the Tractatus, and I asked him whether he still held the same views that he had expressed twenty-eight years earlier. He remained silent for a long time and then said, “Which newspaper do you represent?” I told him I was a student and not a journalist, but he never answered my question. Wittgenstein’s response to me was humiliating." - Adriano from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Language use is simpler than previously thought - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
"ScienceDaily (Sep. 25, 2012) — For more than 50 years, language scientists have assumed that sentence structure is fundamentally hierarchical, made up of small parts in turn made of smaller parts, like Russian nesting dolls. But a new Cornell University study suggests language use is simpler than they had thought." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Co-author Morten Christiansen, Cornell professor of psychology and co-director of the Cornell Cognitive Science Program, and his colleagues say that language is actually based on simpler sequential structures, like clusters of beads on a string." - Maitani
"Research in cognitive neuroscience shows that the same set of brain regions seem to be involved in both sequential learning and language, suggesting that language is processed sequentially. And several recent psycholinguistic studies have shown that how well adults and children perform on a sequence learning task strongly predicts how well they can process the deluge of words that come... more... - Maitani
Cornell Chronicle: Language use is simpler than previously thought http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories... - Maitani
If they only provided a description of some evidence they consulted to substantiate their bold assertions. Maybe the the original report on the study provides some, but I can't access that. - Maitani
You can't see this: http://rspb.royalsocietypublis...? - Eivind
Oh, I can! :-) I assumed I couldn't because it is regularly the case with sources of SD articles. Thank you. :-) - Maitani
You're welcome :) - Eivind
Adriano
MAGNUM :: What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime? - http://online.wsj.com/article...
MAGNUM :: What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?
MAGNUM :: What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?
"For more than half a century, Magnum photographers showed us the importance of picturing the human condition alongside reporting the news. An unintended consequence of their success has been to reduce news stories to a strikingly similar set of images: brave soldiers, weeping mothers, hungry refugees, election candidates reaching for a wall of hands. With the decline of the press and its demand for relevance, we have lost the tension between good and good-enough-to-show-the-world. When there were fewer photographers, Magnum admitted only the best to its club, and we trusted it to be our gatekeeper. Now we live in a world without Life magazine, but with too many pictures. What form of photojournalist will emerge from these conditions? Who can make images for the digital world that will show us something we can't see without them?" - Adriano from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Henry MARSH :: "Descartes placed the human soul in the pineal gland. I had a patient who had a tumour of the pineal gland..." - http://www.granta.com/New-Wri...
Henry MARSH :: "Descartes placed the human soul in the pineal gland. I had a patient who had a tumour of the pineal gland..."
"The idea that I am cutting and pushing through thought itself, that memories, dreams and reflections should have the consistency of soft white jelly, is simply too strange to understand. I know that if I stray into the wrong area, into what neurosurgeons call eloquent brain, I will be faced with a damaged and disabled patient afterwards. The brain does not come with helpful labels saying "Cut here" or "Don’t cut there." Eloquent brain looks no different from any other area of the brain, so when I go round to the Recovery Ward after the operation to see what I have achieved, I am always anxious. There are various ways in which the risk of doing damage can be reduced. There is a form of GPS for brain surgery called Computer Navigation where there are infrared cameras around the patient’s head which show the surgeon on a computer screen where his instruments are on the patient’s brain scan. You can operate with the patient awake under local anaesthetic: the eloquent areas of the brain... more... - Adriano from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Why couldn't Buddha vacuum his couch? :: Because he had no attachments.
Why couldn't Buddha vacuum his couch? :: Because he had no attachments.
BTW, "Life is a process of dynamic renewal. We're all shedding about 500 million skin cells every day. That is the dust that accumulates in your home; that's you. You shed your entire outer layer of skin every two to four weeks." --J. Craig Venter, http://edge.org/convers... :-) - Adriano
Wildcat
Music, Mind, and Meaning by Marvin Minsky | MIT (1981) - http://web.media.mit.edu/~minsky... (via http://friendfeed.com/music-c...)
Music, Mind, and Meaning by Marvin Minsky | MIT (1981) - http://web.media.mit.edu/~minsky/papers/MusicMindMeaning.html (via http://ff.im/ZFtvf)
John (bird whisperer)
Spider swarm attack in India questioned by experts | The Sideshow - Yahoo! News - http://news.yahoo.com/blogs...
Spider swarm attack in India questioned by experts | The Sideshow - Yahoo! News
"Rest easy arachnophobes, a recently reported attack by a swarm of tarantula-like spiders is probably no more reputable than the 1977 William Shatner clunker, "Kingdom of the Spiders." The Times of India reported over the weekend that a swarm of aggressive spiders attacked dozens of people in the remote Indian town of Sadiya, killing two residents. One resident, Jintu Gogoi, told The Times that his finger was "black and swollen" after being bit by one of the spiders. The alleged attack, which was said to have occurred during a local festival, has been reported by a number of national news organizations, leading to speculation about whether a "new" species of spider could be responsible for the bites. However, CNN reports that spider experts are placing doubt on the claims made by the paper. "The evidence that we gathered does not support the claim that they died after being bitten by spiders," said LR Saikia, who led a team of researchers from Dibrugarh University, to investigate the... more... - John (bird whisperer) from Bookmarklet
"Saikia said that a dozen people have recently visited local hospitals complaining of spider bites but that only two of the complaints have been confirmed. "Only two of them were confirmed bitten by spiders. But they were ordinary spiders," Saikia said. About 20 spiders were captured and given to Saikia and his team. Local tarantulas are not believed to have venom lethal to humans but... more... - John (bird whisperer)
טעות בזיהוי
Adriano
Feynman principle :: "You must not fool yourself -- and you are the easiest person to fool." - http://online.wsj.com/article...
Feynman principle :: "You must not fool yourself -- and you are the easiest person to fool."
"Monitor yourself for vehemence. If you find yourself tempted to ridicule anyone who tells you are wrong, you probably are wrong. The philosopher Bertrand Russell wisely warned that the less evidence someone has that his ideas are right, "the more vehemently he asserts that there is no doubt whatsoever that he is exactly right." \\ Try the technique that psychologist Gary Klein calls a "pre-mortem." Gather a group of people whose views you respect. Ask them all to imagine looking back, a year from now, at the [decision] you just made -- and that it has turned out to be a disaster. Have them list all the possible causes of the failure. That may well help you see how it might have been avoided." - Adriano from Bookmarklet
I regret to see you exterminated my first and only, humblest and sincere trolling attempt :/ - babeuf
I'm a physicist myself and an urge to troll a post about feynman just kindled in me, just right after seeing this photo of his pointing his balls gently. - babeuf
"Physics is like sex; sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it." --Richard Feynman http://qph.cf.quoracdn.net/main-qi... - Adriano
Wildcat
A worthy read: Is Death Bad for You? - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - https://chronicle.com/article...
"By Shelly Kagan We all believe that death is bad. But why is death bad?" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Francis BACON :: Study for a Portrait (1991) . [National Galleries of Scotland] - http://www.nationalgalleries.org/collect...
Francis BACON :: Study for a Portrait (1991) . [National Galleries of Scotland]
"This is one of the last paintings Bacon completed. It is the second in a series of three portraits of his friend, the artist Anthony Zych. Zych appears to be standing in a doorway, possibly that of the artist's studio. The camera tripod is an element repeated from the central panel of a triptych painted in 1944. Bacon's portraits were almost without exception of people with whom he was familiar. He preferred to paint his subjects not from life but from photographs." \\ via @jamreilly - Adriano from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Roger PENROSE :: "The conscious brain does not act according to classical physics. It doesn’t even act according to conventional quantum mechanics. It acts according to a theory we don’t yet have." - http://discovermagazine.com/2009...
Roger PENROSE :: "The conscious brain does not act according to classical physics. It doesn’t even act according to conventional quantum mechanics. It acts according to a theory we don’t yet have."
"You’re led to a completely crazy point of view: this “many worlds” stuff, which has no relationship to what we actually perceive. [W]hat can you do with it? Nothing. You want a physical theory that describes the world that we see around us. That’s what physics has always been: Explain what the world that we see does, and why or how it does it. [Q]uantum mechanics is not exactly right, and I think there’s a lot of evidence for that. [S]tring theory has no experimental support. [My] book is called _Fashion, Faith and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe_. Each of those words stands for a major theoretical physics idea. The fashion is string theory; the fantasy has to do with various cosmological schemes, mainly inflationary cosmology. Big fish, those things are. It’s almost sacrilegious to attack them. And the other one, even more sacrilegious, is quantum mechanics at all levels—so that’s the faith. People somehow got the view that you really can’t question it." - Adriano from Bookmarklet
See also Conscious Understanding: What is its Physical Basis? -- Roger Penrose' lecture http://ff.im/yUxT0 and Consciousness > Orchestrated Objective Reduction of Quantum Coherence in Brain Microtubules http://ff.im/yZzNP - Amira
Adriano
SOPHOCLES :: "Who, in my situation, has never once taken a sheep for a warrior? Is that so monstrous? On the contrary, it is something universally human." (circa 440 B.C.)
SOPHOCLES :: "Who, in my situation, has never once taken a sheep for a warrior? Is that so monstrous? On the contrary, it is something universally human." (circa 440 B.C.)
After Agamemnon awards Achilles' armor to Odysseus, Ajax goes mad and charges a herd of sheep, thinking that they were soldiers. When he regains his sanity, Ajax slays himself on the sword. Nietzsche later remarks that Ajax might not have thought his suicide necessary had he only been able to cool his feeling for one more day. - Adriano
it's difficult to directly upload an animated-GIF to FF, so one must use the RSS feed mechanism to forward the image, then edit the title. - Adriano
Amira
Kathryn Schulz On being wrong | TED "The miracle of your mind isn’t that you can see the world as it is, but that you can see the world as it isn’t." - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Kathryn Schulz On being wrong | TED "The miracle of your mind isn’t that you can see the world as it is, but that you can see the world as it isn’t."
Play
“We can remember the past and we can think about the future, and we can imagine what it’s like to be some other person in some other place. And we all do this differently.” // "Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we're wrong about that? "Wrongologist" Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility. She is the author of "Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error," and writes "The Wrong Stuff," a Slate series featuring interviews with high-profile people about how they think and feel about being wrong." - Amira from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Paul KING :: Insights about the world that neuroscientists take for granted, but would seem counterintuitive or mind blowing to most non-neuroscientists (2011) - http://www.quora.com/Neurosc...
Paul KING :: Insights about the world that neuroscientists take for granted, but would seem counterintuitive or mind blowing to most non-neuroscientists (2011)
superb post... "1. Body image is dynamic and flexible. Our brain can be fooled into thinking a rubber arm or a virtual reality hand is actually a part of our body. \\ 2. Perceptual reality is entirely generated by our brain. http://ff.im/RCRkS \\ 3. We think we see the whole world, but we are looking through a narrow visual portal onto a small region of space. \\ 4. Our behavior is mostly automatic, even though we think we are controlling it. \\ 6. How can neurons be so slow and yet we are so smart? \\ 7. Consciousness can be subdivided." \\ Addendum: memory is the neural basis of individuation -- your personal identity, http://ff.im/RD8MM - Adriano from Bookmarklet
Adriano
Steven Piantadosi et al. :: Communicative function of AMBIGUITY in language (2010 pre-print) . [2012 Cognition 122(3):280-91] - https://docs.google.com/viewer...
Steven Piantadosi et al. :: Communicative function of AMBIGUITY in language (2010 pre-print) . [2012 Cognition 122(3):280-91] - https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fweb.mit.edu%2Fpiantado%2Fwww%2Fpapers%2FPiantadosiTilyGibson2010-submitted.pdf
We want to be precise in our communications -- but that must be balanced with the need for efficiency. The paper above uses information theory to argue that ambiguity is necessary in any efficient communication system when content is informative about meaning. Also @amirask refers to another interesting paper, Compression without a common prior by Brendan Juba et al. (Proceedings of ICS 2011, 79-86), in which speaker and listener have different prior beliefs about what a speaker may say. Again, information theory shows why ambiguity is necessary for the purpose of efficient communication (compression): https://docs.google.com/viewer... - Adriano
Thank you for selecting these articles. Having read Amira's post, I felt I should read up on the topic a bit. Will do that at the weekend. :-) - Maitani
In philosophy the usual assumption is that language can disambiguate meaning (e.g. early Wittgenstein). These papers rigorously show that in ideal communications, ambiguity is unavoidable (which is what Wittgenstein later observed as language games). The ingenious part is how this is related to the compression of data before transmission on a network. Articulation (bandwidth) is expensive while inference (decompression) is cheap -- on the cognitive (data) level. - Adriano
ya gotta see this: http://www.dead-philosophers.com/... Wittgenstein shows everyone his doodle :-) - Adriano
That's great, thanks :-) - Maitani
Ken Morley
I think this justifies my fast food addiction
fastFood.jpg
John (bird whisperer)
Kitchen Volume Conversions. - John (bird whisperer) from Bookmarklet
I knew that drops had a standardized volume. (My mom tells me stories about how back in the day before automatic infusion pumps existed, she had to titrate the flow rate of IV fluids based on drops per minute.) I didn't realized dashes and pinches did, too. - Victor Ganata
Drops and pinches might not be things most people will find easy to standardize, though. At least without a measuring device. - John (bird whisperer)
Although I guess a drop in the kitchen isn't quite exactly the same as a drop in the hospital http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... - Victor Ganata
Those equivalences are all over the place, relatively speaking. - John (bird whisperer)
I have a set of measuring spoons for "Nip", "Smidgen", "Pinch" and "Dash". I don't really use them, but they're cute. - m9m, Crone of FriendFeed
Yep, John, very similar. I like how they look so professional but you really don't need to measure anything that small when you're cooking. - m9m, Crone of FriendFeed
Cliff Gerrish
The dumbphone strikes back | ExtremeTech http://www.extremetech.com/computi...
Adriano
Tom SIEGFRIED :: Self As Symbol (2012) . [Science News 181(3):28] - http://www.sciencenews.org/view...
Tom SIEGFRIED :: Self As Symbol (2012) . [Science News 181(3):28] - http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/337947/title/Self_as_Symbol
Tom SIEGFRIED :: Self As Symbol (2012) . [Science News 181(3):28] - http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/337947/title/Self_as_Symbol
"Floods of raw sensory data trigger perceptions that fall into categories designated by “symbols that stand for abstract regularities in the world,” Douglas Hofstadter asserts. Human brains create vast repertoires of these symbols, conferring the “power to represent phenomena of unlimited complexity and thus to twist back and to engulf themselves via a strange loop.” Consciousness itself occurs when a system with such ability creates a higher-level symbol, a symbol for the ability to create symbols. That symbol is the self. The I. Consciousness. “You and I are mirages that perceive themselves.”" - Adriano
"Gödel’s proof emerged from deep insights into the self-referential nature of mathematical statements. He showed how a system referring to itself creates paradoxes that cannot be logically resolved — and so certain questions cannot in principle be answered. Consciousness, in a way, is in the same logical boat. At its core, consciousness is self-referential awareness, the self’s sense of its own existence. It is consciousness itself that is trying to explain consciousness." - Adriano
John (bird whisperer)
Bagged greens: To wash or not to wash - latimes.com - http://www.latimes.com/health...
Bagged greens: To wash or not to wash - latimes.com
"The salad chefs I know fall into two camps: Some serve pre-washed bagged leafy greens straight from the bag. The others insist on washing them first, even though the bag label promises that the contents are "triple-washed." Over the years, I've ignored those labels too. I typically dumped bagged greens in the salad spinner, added plenty of water and spun strenuously. After writing too many stories about food recalls, I vowed that family and friends were not going to swallow E. coli along with their spring mix and lemon vinaigrette. Now it seems the straight-from-the-bag camp may have it right after all. By re-washing our greens, we may be making our salads dirtier, according to a bevy of food safety experts. Even our best-kept kitchens can teem with all sorts of harmful pathogens, on cutting boards and in salad spinners, on knives that just sliced raw chicken, on damp, well-used cloth towels. "In brief, consumers don't wash up very well and may contaminate produce due to dirty hands... more... - John (bird whisperer) from Bookmarklet
Yay! One less step in food prep! - Anne Bouey
Lately I've been washing heads of lettuce but not the bagged greens. - John (bird whisperer)
Wash. I always wash. Though I don't buy a lot of bagged greens. - Zulema ❧ spicy cocoa tart
I will wash any veggies, bagged or not. I even wash the "pre-washed" lettuce. You don't know what's "grown" in the bag while it's been sitting in the store's F&G section. - #cryptic
A friend used to get stomach aches from bagged greens, until someone suggested she wash them first. That fixed it. - Betsy
Amira
Infinite Stupidity. Social evolution may have sculpted us not to be innovators and creators as much as to be copiers | Edge - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post...
Infinite Stupidity. Social evolution may have sculpted us not to be innovators and creators as much as to be copiers | Edge
"If we think that humans have evolved as social learners, we might be surprised to find out that being social learners has made us less intelligent than we might like to think we are. And here’s the reason why. (...) I can choose among the best of those ideas, without having to go through the process of innovation myself. So, for example, if I’m trying to make a better spear, I really have no idea how to make that better spear. But if I notice that somebody else in my society has made a very good spear, I can simply copy him without having to understand why. (...) We like to think we’re a highly inventive, innovative species. But social learning means that most of us can make use of what other people do, and not have to invest the time and energy in innovation ourselves. (...) As our societies get larger and larger, there’s no need, in fact, there’s even less of a need for any one of us to be an innovator, whereas there is a great advantage for most of us to be copiers, or followers.... more... - Amira from Bookmarklet
"I want to go further, and suggest that our mechanism for generating ideas maybe couldn’t even be much better than random itself. And this really gives us a different view of ourselves as intelligent organisms. Rather than thinking that we know the answers to everything, could it be the case that the mechanism that our brain uses for coming up with new ideas is a little bit like the... more... - Amira
Very culturally specific though - varies between countries - Winckel from iPod
"Maybe curiosity means trying out all sorts of ideas in your mind. Maybe curiosity is a passion for trying out ideas. Maybe Einstein’s ideas were just as random as everybody else’s, but he kept persisting at them. (...) We might even wonder if the people in our history and in our lives that we say are the great innovators really are more innovative, or are just lucky." - Amira
This notion has been thoroughly explored in Dean K. Simonton's _Origins of Genius_. http://amzn.to/e48PEo - Ruchira S. Datta
Thanks for pointing this book, Ruchira! I still have in mind Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers" - an interesting study of what determines the "success" and redefines the word "genius" (from a more sociological context). http://www.amazon.com/Outlier... - Amira
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