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lris
I like it, but I'm mystified by people who "kind of wish people wouldn’t keep throwing posts into the void"--I always wonder why people feel *other people* should stop doing things they find worthwhile. - Walt Crawford
I agree, Walt. If they don't want to read my drivel, there's plenty more out there on the Net to keep anyone entertained, educated, and informed. In the end, would they rather me throw posts into the void or apply them to a wall using Krylon? :) - Dan: Bibrarian
That's easy to say and believe in theory, but I think the sentiment was more complicated than I could really make it late at night (I set it to auto post thinking I'd have time to tinker this morning... oh well). For me, when I've had the thought that I kind of wish people would just give up, it was more because I couldn't see the value in what I was producing, but that I first experienced that thought as frustration with what (a few) other people were doing. Only later did I realize it was at least as much about me. And now I don't care about the "value" of what I'm producing as much. Progress? Who knows. - lris
I certainly agree that there are times when it pays to set aside "value" questions. If I only did things that I was sure had lasting and significant value...well, that would leave a lot of time for daytime TV and other truly valuable activities. - Walt Crawford
I would blog if I still had the time and energy. :( - David Rothman (☤)
"Marked at Read." Really, I read and enjoyed the post. Eventually the term "blogging" will go away, and publishing will take its place. That is simply it. Publish what you want to publish, and the people who like to read what you have to say will find it and like it. - Joe
I agree with your thought that sometimes we need our personal space to think. Isn't that why a lot of us started blogs in the first place? We had something to say and wanted somewhere of our own to say it? I've argued with myself on continuing to blog because I don't have a huge audience, am not ridiculously prolific, haven't started too many wars. But it's my space and I get to see what I've written, ideas I've had and where I'm going. And if it helps other people think about things too...that's not a bad thing. - Hedgehog
I doubt "blogging" will go away, at least not for a long time. There are many forms of publishing, and most of them have their own names--journals, magazines, articles, short stories, novellas, books, flyers, newspapers, blogs, lifestreams (ugh), what have you. As with books, the uses of blogs change as other media (e.g. "microblogging," upgraded from ugh to meh) add other choices. - Walt Crawford
Personal space to think is why I continue mine although I don't hold myself to any particular topics, audience, length of entries (diminishing with life/job duties) or number of updates (except Fridays). If I have something to say, I write. If someone else finds it interesting, great. I've never thought I Must Contribute Great Things To The Library Field Through Blogging because I know I don't. I don't know what my mindset is for much of anything else either but that rarely stops me ;) - Nikki D.
I'm one of those people who sometimes "kind of wish[es] people wouldn’t keep throwing posts into the void," so let me see if I can de-mystify that point of view. It's similar to the thought that perhaps a certain band should have quit before their music got repetitive and predictable, or that a certain sports hero should have stayed retired the first time. It's how I feel when I see that someone has posted something and I remember how I used to feel excited about it and now I feel dutiful or annoyed. It's a worry that what I have written seems as boring and repetitive and what I am reading. It's a sense that I'd rather people followed Walt's First Law more diligently. It's a feeling that is not entirely rational and not entirely flattering to admit, and it says more about me than it does about the people who are still blogging. - Steele Lawman
I think it's interesting that the proliferation of strong blogging communities has really been very positive for science blogging. It's lead to some really exciting times and lots of attention to the networks and the bloggers. The downside, of course, is that probably at least some independent bloggers feel left out and wondering how they can attract traffic. - John Dupuis
I think approaching blogging as if it were a band or a sport is part of what I'm trying to get away from. The blogs I've loved are the ones that give me insight into the thoughts of people I like and respect. It's the people that matter to me more than the performance. I don't get tired of hearing friends talk about what they're contemplating the way I get tired of same-old-same-old from a band. - lris
I'm with Iris and Nikki here--and I see what Steve's saying. I really, truly, wholly dislike the whole "blogging is ALWAYS AND ENTIRELY about Building Your Brand" notion, and all the "you must post x items per day, but hey, you can buy ideas" crap that goes with it. I think liblogs are mostly out of that nonsense. Mostly. - Walt Crawford