Sign in or Join FriendFeed
FriendFeed is the easiest way to share online. Learn more »
Russian Fairytales (1915) | The Public Domain Review - http://publicdomainreview.org/collect...
"A collection of Russian fairytales translated from the Russian of Nikolai Polevoy, a notable editor, writer, translator in the early 19th century. The translations were made by Robert Nisbet Bain, a British historian who worked for the British Museum, and a polyglot who could reportedly speak over twenty languages fluently. He famously taught himself Hungarian in order that he could read the works of Mór Jókai in the original after first reading him in German, going on to become the most prolific translator into English from Hungarian in the nineteenth century." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Baba Yaga! - Eivind
@eivind you know (about) Baba Yaga? o_O - непростые коротышки
Baba Yaga and other Fairytales: http://www.boredpanda.com/dark-si... - justcupoftea
I do, silpol. I don't remember when I first encountered her, but I know I encountered her in The Secret History of Moscow, by Ekaterina Sedia :) - Eivind
@justcupoftea thanks! - непростые коротышки
"The cooperative network Comparative Oriental Manuscript Studies is dedicated to academic dialogue in the field of Oriental manuscript studies with the focus on the Mediterranean and North African cultural areas. It organizes conferences and workshops; publishes journals and monographs; issues a regular mailing list; and facilitates exchange and cooperation in related fields" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Dyeing for Color | The Metropolitan Museum of Art - http://www.metmuseum.org/visit...
Dyeing for Color | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Show all
"This fall I planted saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) corms in the bed devoted to the medieval plants used by artists and craftsmen. I was pleasantly surprised that within a handful of weeks, the infamous saffron crocus was in bloom. The C. sativus is a type of autumn-blooming crocus (yes, that's right: it blooms in the autumn, not the spring) with origins in southern Europe and southwestern Asia, and probably stems from the wild crocus (Crocus cartwrightianus) native to the Greek island of Crete and mainland Greece (Cardon 302)." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"C. sativus is attractive, with its fragrant, lilac-purple flowers and characteristic three red stigmas and yellow anthers. Crocus comes from the Greek krokos, meaning thread, and refers to the plants' slender stigmas. The stigmas are hand-picked, ideally on a sunny morning when the flowers have fully opened, and then dried, giving us the world's most expensive spice: saffron. The... more... - Maitani
Ancient Scrolls, Burned in Vesuvius Volcano Eruption, Deciphered by Advanced X-Ray Scans - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Ancient Scrolls, Burned in Vesuvius Volcano Eruption, Deciphered by Advanced X-Ray Scans - Scientific American
"Scientists in Italy have managed to decipher text on a badly scorched papyrus roll from Herculaneum, a town destroyed with Pompeii in the Mount Vesuvius eruption of 79AD. The imaging technique they used may allow archaeologists to analyse other texts previously thought to be too badly damaged to read." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Hundreds of carbonised papyrus rolls were excavated from the ‘Villa of the Papyri’ in Herculaneum in 1754, said to contain the only surviving library from antiquity. Many of the texts were later stored in the National Library of Naples and several were given to Napoléon Bonaparte as a gift in 1802." - Maitani
Goya: Order and Disorder by Colm Tóibín | The Gallery | The New York Review of Books - http://www.nybooks.com/blogs...
Goya: Order and Disorder by Colm Tóibín | The Gallery | The New York Review of Books
Goya: Order and Disorder by Colm Tóibín | The Gallery | The New York Review of Books
Goya: Order and Disorder by Colm Tóibín | The Gallery | The New York Review of Books
"There are two ways, perhaps, of looking at Franciso Goya,” writes Colm Tóibín in the Review’s December 18, 2014 issue. In the first version, Goya, who was born near Zaragoza in 1746 and died in exile in France in 1828, “was almost innocent, a serious and ambitious artist interested in mortality and beauty, but also playful and mischievous, until politics and history darkened his imagination…. In the second version, it is as though a war was going on within Goya’s psyche from the very start…. His imagination was ripe for horror.” We present below a series of prints and paintings from the show under review—the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s “Goya: Order and Disorder,” now closed—along with commentary on the images drawn from Tóibín’s piece." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Recovering Assur | The ASOR Blog - http://asorblog.org/recover...
Recovering Assur | The ASOR Blog
Show all
"Perched on the western bank of the Tigris River just about the confluence with the Lesser Zab River, Assur was settled at least since the late Early Dynastic period (about 2500 B.C.). In the beginning of the second millennium, the Old Assyrian period, Assur became the capital of a first Assyrian state and was an important town with a widespread trading network reaching from Iran and Babylonia to Anatolia, trading in metals and textiles. Assur’s location enabled the town to control the trade routes in all directions. In the second half of the second millennium Assur became the capital of the Middle Assyrian Empire. Though in the 9th century the mighty Neo-Assyrian kings had moved to other towns and built their residences in nearby Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Nineveh, Assur still was the religious center of Assyria: the temple of the national god Ashur remained in this town. Some Assyrian kings even returned to Assur after their death, and were buried in the so-called Old Palace, the palace of the forefathers." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
BBC News - Toy trains from the past 200 years - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Toy trains from the past 200 years
"What is it about toy trains that has continued to entertain children, admittedly mostly boys, for nearly two centuries? A major new exhibition is about to find out." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"They ran to your own personal timetable. Engineering work at weekends was rare. And there were never leaves on the line, just the occasional bit of fluff from the living room carpet. For decades, toy trains have enthralled generations of youngsters - and this coming March the National Railway Museum, in York, looks into why children love them so much, in its exhibition Playing Trains." - Maitani
I had a huge train set when I was small. - Greg GuitarBuster
When my son was small, we began to buy toy trains and train sets, just because we were so thrilled about playing with them.The boy never got excited about them. - Maitani
Now Available Online – From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the Iliad | kleos@CHS - http://kleos.chs.harvard.edu/...
Now Available Online – From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the Iliad | kleos@CHS
"The Center for Hellenic Studies is pleased to announce the online publication of From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the Iliad, by Christos Tsagalis on the CHS website." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"What do we mean by “space” in the Iliad? The aim of this book is to offer a systematic and comprehensive presentation of the different types and functions of space in the earliest work of Greek literature. By adopting a twofold division between simple and embedded story space, the former pertaining to the actions of characters and the latter to their thoughts, Christos Tsagalis shows how character drawing and authority are deeply influenced by active spatial representation." - Maitani
‘Persia’ and the western imagination | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2015...
‘Persia’ and the western imagination | OUPblog
"Iran has long had a difficult relationship with the West. Ever since the Islamic Revolution of 1979 overthrew the monarchy and established an Islamic Republic, Iran has been associated in the popular consciousness with militant Islam and radical anti-Westernism. ‘Persia’ by contrast has long been a source of fascination in the Western imagination eliciting both awe and contempt that only familiarity can bring. Indeed if ‘Iran’ seems altogether alien to us, ‘Persia’ seems strangely familiar. There are few cultural icons or aspirations that we would associate with Iran; there are by contrast quite a few we would relate to Persia, most obviously carpets, the occasional cat and for the truly affluent, caviar. That these two words would elicit such dramatically different associations is all the more striking because they are describing the same place. Persia is simply the name inherited from the Greeks and the Romans for the great empire to the East that its inhabitants came to know as... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Yet Persia reminds us that Iran is not as unfamiliar to us as we might imagine. Quite the contrary. The Persians serve an almost unique function in the Western narrative, being present at the birth and some might argue, the creation of a distinctly Western civilisation. If the Greeks under the influence of Herodotus, first defined history as a conflict between ‘East’ and ‘West’,... more... - Maitani
В быту у нас тут очень часто, когда спрашиваешь иранца, откуда он, ответ: I am Persian/from Persia. Остальные говорят I am from Iran, но почти никогда I am an Iranian. Персов тут много, так что выборка приличная, и аффтар прав. - playa dust не всем
Free Courses in Ancient History, Literature & Philosophy | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/free-co...
Free Courses in Ancient History, Literature & Philosophy | Open Culture
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access Monograph Series: Studien zu den Boğazköy-Texten - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2010...
"As the volumes of this series go out of print they will be made available online at the Mainz Hethitologieportal. Do your part for open access and buy copies of the volumes still in print!" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Currently available online are: StBoT 1: Heinrich Otten, Vladimir Souček Das Gelübde der Königin Puduḫepa an die Göttin Lelwani 1965. [vergriffen] PDF StBoT 2: Onofrio Carruba Das Beschwörungsritual für die Göttin Wišurijanza 1966. [vergriffen] PDF StBoT 3: Hans Martin Kümmel Ersatzrituale für den hethitischen König 1967. [vergriffen] PDF StBoT 4: Rudolf Werner Hethitische... more... - Maitani
BBC News - Would you be beautiful in the ancient world? - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Would you be beautiful in the ancient world?
"In ancient Greece the rules of beauty were all important. Things were good for men who were buff and glossy. And for women, fuller-figured redheads were in favour - but they had to contend with an ominous undercurrent, historian Bettany Hughes explains." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"A full-lipped, cheek-chiselled man in Ancient Greece knew two things - that his beauty was a blessing (a gift of the gods no less) and that his perfect exterior hid an inner perfection. For the Greeks a beautiful body was considered direct evidence of a beautiful mind. They even had a word for it - kaloskagathos - which meant being gorgeous to look at, and hence being a good person." - Maitani
I'd be ancient in the ancient world :) - Eivind
What the World Will Speak in 2115 - WSJ - by John H. MCWhorter - http://www.wsj.com/article...
What the World Will Speak in 2115 - WSJ - by John H. MCWhorter
"In 1880 a Bavarian priest created a language that he hoped the whole world could use. He mixed words from French, German and English and gave his creation the name Volapük, which didn’t do it any favors. Worse, Volapük was hard to use, sprinkled with odd sounds and case endings like Latin." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"It made a splash for a few years but was soon pushed aside by another invented language, Esperanto, which had a lyrical name and was much easier to master. A game learner could pick up its rules of usage in an afternoon." - Maitani
"But it didn’t matter. By the time Esperanto got out of the gate, another language was already emerging as an international medium: English. Two thousand years ago, English was the unwritten tongue of Iron Age tribes in Denmark. A thousand years after that, it was living in the shadow of French-speaking overlords on a dampish little island. No one then living could have dreamed that... more... - Maitani
We'll communicate solely with emoji. The return of the pictograms. Full circle :) - Eivind
If the masses use emoji I will switch to kamoji - Amit Patel
Deep Habits: Read a (Real) Book Slowly - Study Hacks - Cal Newport - http://calnewport.com/blog...
Deep Habits: Read a (Real) Book Slowly - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"There was a time when intellectual engagement necessarily included long hours reading old-fashioned paper tomes. But in an age when a digital attention economy is ascendant, it’s now possible to satisfy this curiosity without ever consuming more than a couple hundred highly digested and simplified words at a time." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with this new form of lightweight information consumption — the problem is the behaviors it tends to replace." - Maitani
"Reading a hard book, we must remember, is an experience that returns many rewards not generated by a pithy blog post (ahem) or online magazine." - Maitani
I think I would have got more out of this article if it were longer and more complex. - Todd Hoff
Agreed, there is not much to learn here. I posted it mostly as a reminder for myself. :-) - Maitani
3quarksdaily: Typical Dreams: A Comparison of Dreams Across Cultures - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: Typical Dreams: A Comparison of Dreams Across Cultures
"Have you ever wondered how the content of your dreams differs from that of your friends? How about the dreams of people raised in different countries and cultures? It is not always easy to compare dreams of distinct individuals because the content of dreams depends on our personal experiences. This is why dream researchers have developed standardized dream questionnaires in which common thematic elements are grouped together. These questionnaires can be translated into various languages and used to survey and scientifically analyze the content of dreams. Open-ended questions about dreams might elicit free-form, subjective answers which are difficult to categorize and analyze. Therefore, standardized dream questionnaires ask study subjects "Have you ever dreamed of . . ." and provide research subjects with a list of defined dream themes such as being chased, flying or falling." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
I have the strangest dreams every night. I don't understand why, but my brain loves to play while I sleep. I wish I could turn it off every once in awhile. - Jenny H. from Android
"Happy New Year and happy sixth birthday to AWOL, which launched 6 January 2009.  During those six years I have written and edited 3913 entries." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"AWOL passed the three million page views threshold this autumn (with 3,126,777 page views recorded as of today, to be exact), and now has more than 7400 subscribers by email. I'm gratified that such a large number of you find AWOL interesting enough to voluntarily add another piece of email to your busy queues each day." - Maitani
"AWOL' s Alphabetical list of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies currently includes 1447 titles. I continuously edit and revise the list as URLs change, titles go offline, and so on." - Maitani
Well done! Congratulations. - آزاده (Azade)
Agreed, absolutely. Mr Jones has done an excellent job, and I hope he'll carry on. :-) - Maitani
Murty Classical Library Catalogs Indian Literature - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2015...
Murty Classical Library Catalogs Indian Literature - NYTimes.com
Murty Classical Library Catalogs Indian Literature - NYTimes.com
Show all
"When the Loeb Classical Library was founded in 1911, it was hailed as a much-needed effort to make the glories of the Greek and Roman classics available to general readers." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Now, Harvard University Press, the publisher of the Loebs, wants to do the same for the far more vast and dizzyingly diverse classical literature of India, in what some are calling one of the most complex scholarly publishing projects ever undertaken." - Maitani
"The Murty Classical Library of India, whose first five dual-language volumes will be released next week, will include not only Sanskrit texts but also works in Bangla, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Persian, Prakrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu and other languages. Projected to reach some 500 books over the next century, the series is to encompass poetry and prose, history and philosophy, Buddhist... more... - Maitani
"The Murty Classical Library of India, whose first five dual-language volumes will be released next week, will include not only Sanskrit texts but also works in Bangla, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Persian, Prakrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu and other languages. Projected to reach some 500 books over the next century, the series is to encompass poetry and prose, history and philosophy, Buddhist... more... - Maitani
This is a spectacular, very important project, which has been long overdue. I am excited! I hope the editors/publishers will be in a position to follow through on it. - Maitani
It would be lovely, though we still have the "Sacred Books of the East", edited by Max Müller, that covers some very important books from India. - Haukr
Sure, but the scope of this series is different and much wider, as to the intention of the editors. The "Sacred Books of the East" series focuses on ancient religious texts, it is undispensable, of course, and precious, but what about secular literature, later works, works written in languages that are not Indo-Aryan? - Maitani
Sacred Books of the East http://www.sacred-texts.com/sbe... - Maitani
yes, of course, that's why we're all looking forward to this new catalog :) - Haukr
I am not sure about that. In German schools, we learn next to nothing about the political or cultural history of South Asia (and other regions) before colonialism. I don't know who will be interested in these works other than indologists. - Maitani
The situation's not different in Italy, but I have a personal interest in India and such books can be very difficult to find (even more with a translation). I suppose that the translation itself and the ebook format might help to create a greater audience, or to allow more studies and papers on the subject of the said books. - Haukr
Do you have special spheres of interest related to India? - Maitani
mostly myths and religions. - Haukr
Babel's Dawn: Signaling the Intent to Signal - http://www.babelsdawn.com/babels_...
Babel's Dawn: Signaling the Intent to Signal
"Before I get distracted by too much nit-picking, let me get to the summary paragraph: Thomas Scott-Phillips' book, Speaking Our Minds, contributes seriously to the study of language origins. First and foremost, it demands that pragmatics—the study of language in its social context—be included in the effort to understand language origins. What's more, it makes good on its case. Pragmatics has been underplayed and anybody who thinks about language origins should read and study the book. If the book were not so danged expensive, I would even urge you to buy a copy. (By the way, I've mentioned Scott-Phillips before—see Reality Blogging—and I remember him as a promising fellow at the Barcelona Evolang conference of 2008.)" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The case for pragmatics rests on its special view of language as an ostensive-inferential communications system. Sorry, I'd like to use some other term, but that is the one used by the author and others, so we might as well hold our noses and roll with the bandwagon. You can understand it by imagining the archetypal scene in which Homo erectus A points toward a charging sabertooth... more... - Maitani
SARIT: Search and Retrieval of Indic Texts - http://sarit.indology.info/
SARIT: Search and Retrieval of Indic Texts
"Welcome to the SARIT website. Here you will find electronic editions of Sanskrit and other Indian-language texts. These are documented, dated and have embedded notes about their change history, so that they can be publicly cited and used with confidence as scholarly sources. The editions in the SARIT library currently include these works. This website also currently offers tools for text search, retrieval and analysis of the works in the SARIT library. You can search for a single word, phrase, words that occur in the same paragraph, and so forth. You can generate an index of terms, a KWIC index, and word-frequency lists. You can download all the texts at SARIT. They are licensed under a Creative Commons license. Once downloaded, you can use services such as OxGarage to convert the files to a format that is useful to you, for example PDF, HTML, or for reading on an ebook like the Kindle." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Kumbh Mela: The Greatest Gathering or People on the Planet ~ Kuriositas - http://www.kuriositas.com/2015...
Kumbh Mela: The Greatest Gathering or People on the Planet ~ Kuriositas
"Kumbh Mela is a Hindu pilgrimage which attracts, each year, the greatest peaceful get together of people in the world.  The  Maha Kumbh Mela of 2013 saw over 100 million people gather to bathe at dawn in the sacred Ganges River." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Time-lapse Photography and Adventure Filmmaker Rufus Blackwell was there and captured these astounding time-lapse images." - Maitani
A Calendar Page for January 2015 - Medieval manuscripts blog - http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
A Calendar Page for January 2015 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for January 2015 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for January 2015 - Medieval manuscripts blog
"Regular readers will know that one of our blog traditions is to highlight a calendar from a particular medieval manuscript throughout the course of the year.  Past manuscripts have included the Isabella Breviary, the Hours of Joanna the Mad, the Golf Book, and the Huth Hours.  In 2015 we are pleased to present a manuscript that has featured on our blog before, the London Rothschild Hours.  Confusingly, this manuscript is often also called the Hours of Joanna the Mad (or the Hours of Joanna I of Castile), as it has been suggested that the manuscript belonged to that famous lady." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Evidence that the book was Joanna’s is tantalising, but inconclusive. The repeated presence of Joanna’s name saint, John the Evangelist, is a potential clue, and the presence of a number of Spanish saints in the calendar suggests that it was probably produced for a member of the Spanish aristocracy." - Maitani
This Year in Philology 2014 | Memiyawanzi - http://memiyawanzi.wordpress.com/2014...
"It occurs to me that music bloggers typically make year-end ‘best of’ lists for the best new music they’ve heard this year.  Why shouldn’t I make a post to highlight the most interesting things I’ve read this year that were published this year?  Thanks to my obsessive cataloging of my reading with EndNote, compiling a list is actually not so hard, so without further adieu, and in no particular order (aside from alphabetically, as every good bibliography should be) is my selective list of my philological favourites of 2014:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
TYWKIWDBI ("Tai-Wiki-Widbee"): The giant ash trees of Tasmania - http://tywkiwdbi.blogspot.de/2014...
TYWKIWDBI ("Tai-Wiki-Widbee"): The giant ash trees of Tasmania
"The trees in question are mountain ash, the tallest flowering trees in the world. They are not quite the tallest trees of any kind: that record belongs to the coast redwoods of the western US. But that might be because things have been skewed against the mountain ash..." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"...the tallest trees can suffer from "xylem cavitation", in which gas bubbles form in the cells carrying water up the trunk. These tiny gas embolisms [sic] can prevent water from moving up the tiny conduit cells, much like a pulmonary embolism can stop blood flow to the lungs in humans. To avoid this, the tree regulates how much water is lost through its leaves by closing down the tiny... more... - Maitani
Fwd: White Wine In The Sun by Tim Minchin - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch... via Eivind http://friendfeed.com/eivindn
Fwd: White Wine In The Sun by Tim Minchin - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCNvZqpa-7Q via Eivind http://ff.im/OoVPD
Play
"It's December. Let the season begin. :)" - Maitani
:) - Eivind
up :-) - Maitani
:-) - Maitani
<3 - Maitani
up! - Maitani
:) (We're drinking prosecco in the warm apartment.) - Jenny H. from Android
While it's -16C outside :) - Eivind from Android
It's on Spotify now! :) - Eivind
? - Maitani
It's a music streaming service. :) - Jenny H. from Android
up!!! :-) - Maitani
"Unfortunately, this video is not available in your country..." Is Spotify available to me? - Maitani
I think Spotify is available all over. Maybe not the free version, but at least the subscription one. - Eivind from Android
We have snow! :-)
2014-12-28-566.jpg
Show all
:))) - Jenny H. from Android
\(^_^)/ - Eivind
Christmas Angel
2014-12-24-556.jpg
Christmas Tree 2014
20141224_191556.jpg
Merry Christmas, Maitani! :) - Jenny H. from Android
Merry Christmas to you too, Jenny! :-) - Maitani
Merry Christmas! - Greg GuitarBuster
Merry Christmas, Greg! - Maitani
Merry Christmas! - Son of Groucho
Merry Christmas Maitani :-) - Sepi ⌘ سپی
Merry Christmas, Maitani! - Anne Bouey
Merry Christmas, Gordon, Sepi, and Anne! :-) - Maitani
Merry Christmas :) - Eivind from Android
Eivind! Merry Christmas, I hope the two of you are having a wonderful holiday season. :-) - Maitani
Maitani Good happy new year and merry christmas - ramazan cekic
Merry Christmas, dear Maitani! - mina_sydney from iPhone
A Christmas tree with real candles! Beautiful! :-) - Amira
Merry Christmas, Mina and Ramazan! - Maitani
Thank you, Amira. In our family we always have had real candles. :-) - Maitani
Maitani çok merci merry christmas - ramazan cekic
19 Amazing Sites To Get Free Stock Photos » SideJobr: Labor for your neighbor - http://sidejobr.com/help...
19 Amazing Sites To Get Free Stock Photos » SideJobr: Labor for your neighbor
"In this post, we’ve created a list for you of awesome websites that have free stock photos. This is not the end all – be all of sites and if you find others, please feel free to list them in the comment section. Note: Most of these images fall under a creative commons license (just make sure you attribute properly) or are old enough that the photos have returned to the public domain. (This happens once the copyright on an image expires.)" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Found via Another Word For It http://tm.durusau.net/?p=59044 - Maitani
December Darkness Across the Universe - Out There - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/outther...
December Darkness Across the Universe - Out There
"During the darkest days of December, it makes me feel better to think about all the other, more profound darknesses out there in the universe. A little dose of the old perspective, you know. And boy, there are a lot of them–not just a lot of dark places, but a lot of different forms of darkness out there. In fact, there’s a lot more darkness than most of us realize, for an obvious if easily overlooked reason: Space images are calibrated to highlight faint or even invisible detail, making the universe seem like a much brighter place than it really is." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Consider, for instance, Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the now-famous comet being explored by the Rosetta spacecraft (and home to the intrepid, hibernating Philae lander). In all the images you see online, it looks brightly lit. Even the allegedly “true color” image, which is supposed to show what the Comet C-G would look like to the human eye up close, is a bright green-tinged gray. Here’s the truth: The comet is blacker than coal." - Maitani
Other ways to read this feed:Feed readerFacebook