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Maitani › Comments

Maitani
"About eight years ago I began translating Book 2 of the Homeric Iliad as part of a translation project I was working on together with Mary Ebbott, Doug Frame, Lenny Muellner, and Greg Nagy at the Center for Hellenic Studies. These were the operating principles we set for ourselves: 1. Same word translated the same way each time [except in the case of glossary words, which are included in brackets]. 2. For glossary words in brackets, one form of the Greek word for all derivatives 3. Include plus verses. 4. We try to follow Greek word order. 5. We substitute names for pronouns when the reference is not obvious. 6. We respect the integrity of the line even at the expense of the distinction between active and passive voice." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Oral Poetics and the Homer Multitext http://homermultitext.blogspot.de/2014... - Maitani
Maitani
Kids' earliest memories might be earlier than they think -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Kids' earliest memories might be earlier than they think -- ScienceDaily
"Four- to 13-year-olds in upstate New York and Newfoundland, Canada, probed their memories when researchers asked: "You know, some kids can remember things that happened to them when they were very little. What is the first thing you can remember? How old were you at that time?" The researchers then returned a year or two later to ask again about earliest memories -- and at what age the children were when the events occurred." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
""The age estimates of earliest childhood memories are not as accurate as what has been generally assumed," report Qi Wang of Cornell University and Carole Peterson of Memorial University of Newfoundland in the March 2014 online issue of Developmental Psychology. "Using children's own age estimates as the reference, we found that memory dating shifted to later ages as time elapsed."" - Maitani
I'm constantly amazed at things my kids remember at age 2. Out of the blue stuff, too. And the postdating is interesting. I've noticed that I've done that and it's kind of wild to see it happen so quickly in my kids. There's a memory my daughter remembers happening (she was 2.5). Last week, when she mentioned it, she was sure she was almost 4. Had to show her a photo. - Anika
Maitani
"Who does the Crimea belong to? First of all, to the sea that made it. Seven thousand years ago, the Black Sea was much lower than it is today. Then a waterfall tumbled over the Bosporus, and the waters began to rise. The flood cut the Crimea off from the mainland – all the way except for a narrow isthmus called the Perekop. Ever since, it has been a rocky island on the shores of a sea of grass." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The steppes belonged to the nomads. Grass meant horses, and freedom. The steppes stretched north, from the mouth of the Danube to the Siberian Altai. Across the centuries they were home to various nomadic confederations and tribes: Scythians, Sarmatians, Huns, Pechenegs, Cumans, Mongols, and Kipchak Turks. The legendary Cimmerians predate them all; the Cossacks are still there today.... more... - Maitani
Maitani
BBC News - Birds choose best building materials - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Birds choose best building materials
BBC News - Birds choose best building materials
"Birds can learn to choose the best building materials for their nests, according to scientists." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Dr Bailey and her colleagues were looking to test the learning ability of birds; their test aimed to work out if the birds could learn to differentiate between materials based on their properties. To test this, they gave one group of finches a flexible, floppy string to build with, and another group stiffer, more "structurally sound" string. Both groups of birds were subsequently... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Fictitious Dishes: Elegant and Imaginative Photographs of Meals from Famous Literature | Brain Pickings - http://www.brainpickings.org/index...
Fictitious Dishes: Elegant and Imaginative Photographs of Meals from Famous Literature | Brain Pickings
Fictitious Dishes: Elegant and Imaginative Photographs of Meals from Famous Literature | Brain Pickings
"Food and literature have a long and arduous relationship, from the Artists’ and Writers’ Cookbook to Jane Austen reimagined in recipes to Alice B. Toklas’s literary memoir disguised as a cookbook to those delicious dishes inspired by Alice in Wonderland. But nowhere does that relationship come alive more vividly and enchantingly than in Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals (public library) — an ingenious project by designer and writer Dinah Fried, who cooks, art-directs, and photographs meals from nearly two centuries of famous fiction. Each photograph is accompanied by the particular passage in which the recipe appeared, as well as a few quick and curious factlets about the respective author, novel, or food." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Eagle hunters of Mongolia | Asher Svidensky Photography - http://www.svidensky.com/post...
Eagle hunters of Mongolia | Asher Svidensky Photography
"During my last voyage to Mongolia, I flew over to Ulgii (or ölgii), the capital of the far west. I went there in order to document the Kazakh eagle hunters' lives in west Mongolia. These eagle hunters, who preserve an old tradition that’s passed from generation to generation, tame eagles and use them for hunting smaller animals, such as foxes and marmots. The eagle hunter’s families live on this side of Mongolia after having migrated between Kazakhstan, Russia and Mongolia until the fall of communism and closing of all borders. The tradition’s preservation was what drew me to them. They preserve it without any touristic nature, unlike in Kazakhstan. These Kazakh eagle hunters, who live in Mongolia today, are the last ones on earth who still deserve the title “Eagle Hunter”. It is not merely a title to them, but a way of life." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
LB: Ratchet Bear
In case we haven't said it on FF, happy birthday, CAJ!
Happy Birthday!! - Katy S
Happy bday! - imabonehead from Android
Happy birthday! - John (bird whisperer)
Happy Birthday! - Kevin Johnson
Happy Birthday, Alan! - Tamara J. B.
Happy Birthday!! - Soup in a TARDIS
Happy birthday! - Anika
Thanks all! I had called it an early day and was probably snoozing by the time this got posted. - (Curtis/Alan) Jackson
Happy birthday, CAJ! :) - Jenny H. from Android
Happy birthday! :) - Eivind
Happy birthday! - Maitani
Happy birthday, Mr. Jackson! (Albeit belatedly bestowed.) - Jkram|ɯɐɹʞſ
Happy birthday, friend. - Micah from FFHound(roid)!
Maitani
The Race Is On to Protect Millions of People from Flooding http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
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"In the wake of Cyclone Aila in 2009, swollen seas washed over the delta of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. The storm surge breached the embankments surrounding a small island that was home to 10,000 families, turning the land into a muddy hell. The deluge of salty water washed out fields, homes, roads and markets just as people had begun to recover from the damage caused 18 months before by Cyclone Sidr. Many migrated to nearby cities. And thousands more took shelter on what remained of the embankments, where lack of sanitation and privacy would soon spur disease and crime." - Maitani
Maitani
Like, Degrading the Language? No Way - by John McWhorter http://www.nytimes.com/2014...
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"IF there is one thing that unites Americans of all stripes, it is the belief that, whatever progress our country might be making, we are moving backward on language. Just look at the crusty discourse level of comments sections and the recreational choppiness of text messages and hit pop songs." - Maitani
"However, amid what often seems like the slack-jawed devolution of a once-mighty language, we can find evidence for, of all things, a growing sophistication." - Maitani
Maitani
The great language game: Confusing languages | Replicated Typo - http://www.replicatedtypo.com/the-gre...
The great language game: Confusing languages | Replicated Typo
"The Great Language Game, have you heard of it? It’s an online game where players compete in matching audio clips to the correct language. The game was created by Lars Yencken earlier this year and has become very popular. Data generated by the game can be used to map what languages the players find hardest to tell apart and support what we’ve known all along: Portuguese does sound a bit slavic!" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The game works like this: you are played a 20 second audio clip of natural speech and your task is to match the audio clip to one of the alternatives provided. As you advance in the game you are given more alternatives. You have three lives and when you fail completely you are given information about the three languages you failed at recognizing (thus invoking an appropriate feeling of... more... - Maitani
Data: language confusion http://lars.yencken.org/dataset... "This page contains data derived from the Great Language Game, meant to help researchers and hobbyists examine what languages people commonly confuse for one another. It currently contains a confusion dataset based on usage. In future it may also contain other datasets relating to the language game." - Maitani
Sounds fun. I'm sure I would be terrible at it. ;) - Jenny H. from Android
i can't get more than 650 points at it - mentegatto
700, now - mentegatto
Maitani
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Iliados: Structural Search: Perform grammatical and syntactical searches on the Perseus Greek Treebank - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2014...
"Iliados: Structural Search: Perform grammatical and syntactical searches on the Perseus Greek Treebank" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"This is a brief overview of the query language for searching the Perseus Treebank data, which has syntactically annotated ancient texts, such as Homer's Iliad. Each sentence in the texts are turned into trees, like sentence diagrams, in a format called a dependency tree. The query language for searching these trees is just the CSS3 query language, with some custom additions... " - Maitani
Victor Ganata
A lot of people find my taste in music questionable in general already, but when it comes to music in other languages (Spanish, Tagalog, Japanese), it's even worse and I almost always gravitate to the cheesiest sounding music with the most wrought and melodramatic lyrics.
It is similar with me when it comes to songs in foreign languages such as Spanish, Croatian (I happen to love Balkan music), Russian etc; I think many of them are very bad taste. I can't stand kitschy German pop songs though. - Maitani
Maitani
I used to copy poems I loved into this journal.
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Der Apfelgarten :) - Eivind from Android
I loved Rilke's garden poems. :-) - Maitani
Maitani
The Coffee Pot That Fueled Honoré de Balzac's Coffee Addiction - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
The Coffee Pot That Fueled Honoré de Balzac's Coffee Addiction - Open Culture
"Last fall, Ayun Halliday revisited Honoré de Balzac’s Humorous Essay, “The Pleasures and Pains of Coffee,” and His Epic Coffee Addiction. Last night, one of our friends on Twitter — @thegliterati — sent this our way: A snapshot of Balzac’s coffee pot. It bears his initials and currently resides at the Maison de Balzac museum in Paris. If you ever find yourself in the 16 arrondissement, pay it a visit and pay it some thanks." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
The Grand Greek Paradox: Bankrupt but embraced by the money markets – On the BBC World Service | Yanis Varoufakis - http://yanisvaroufakis.eu/2014...
The Grand Greek Paradox: Bankrupt but embraced by the money markets – On the BBC World Service | Yanis Varoufakis
"Greece is about to issue 5 year bonds again. Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt and Athens are celebrating Greece’s recovery. For my part, I think (and tell the BBC World Service) that this is a sad day for Greece and it is a sad day for Europe. Why do I refuse to be impressed and join in the celebrations? It is because the Greek state and the Greek banks remain deeply insolvent. And, their return to the money markets is a harbinger of the next terrible phase of Greece’s crisis, rather than a cause for celebration." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
non ho capito quale sarebbe la next terrible phase of Greece's crisiz - mentegatto
Maitani
What is mathematics about? – James Franklin – Aeon - http://aeon.co/magazin...
What is mathematics about? – James Franklin – Aeon
"What is mathematics about? We know what biology is about; it’s about living things. Or more exactly, the living aspects of living things – the motion of a cat thrown out of a window is a matter for physics, but its physiology is a topic for biology. Oceanography is about oceans; sociology is about human behaviour in the mass long-term; and so on. When all the sciences and their subject matters are laid out, is there any aspect of reality left over for mathematics to be about? That is the basic question in the philosophy of mathematics." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
International Dunhuang Project: Some sources for silk in the Stein collection - http://idpuk.blogspot.de/2014...
International Dunhuang Project: Some sources for silk in the Stein collection
"To celebrate 20 years of the International Dunhuang Project, IDP has arranged an extensive programme of events including a half-day of lectures on 11 April ‘Silk on the Silk Road’. In this post I thought I would highlight two sources on silk in the Stein collection, one well-known and the second, a bit more obscure, but equally important for its reference to the silk trade in the fourth century AD." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"This wooden panel dating from ca. seventh century from Dandan Uilik was discovered by Aurel Stein on his first expedition to Khotan in 1900-1901. The scene is thought to depict a story related by the seventh century Chinese traveller Xuanzang of how silkworms were smuggled out of China westwards into Khotan – present day Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. A Chinese princess (second from... more... - Maitani
Maitani
"This page aims at making information on Byzantine Nubia and Nubian monasteries in particular available to wider audience. It will present projects regarding Nubian monasticism but also Nubian culture in general from the times between Napata and Funj kingdoms." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Two years ago I've started a program aimed at synthesis on Nubian monasteries. Thanks to the hospitality of the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago and generosity of the Foundation for Polish Science and de Brzezie Lanckoronski Foundation I lead a project carried out by a team of early career European scholars publishing the Qasr el-Wizz monastery. The monastery has been fully... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Tambora eruption caused the year without a summer: Cholera, opium, famine, and Arctic exploration. - http://www.slate.com/article...
Tambora eruption caused the year without a summer: Cholera, opium, famine, and Arctic exploration.
"Most have heard of the Battle of Waterloo, but who has heard of the volcano called Tambora? No school textbook I’ve seen mentions that only two months before Napoleon’s final defeat in 1815, the faraway Indonesian island of Sumbawa was the site of the most devastating volcanic eruption on Earth in thousands of years." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The death toll was around 100,000 people from the thick pyroclastic flows of lava; the tsunami that struck nearby coasts; and the thick ash that blanketed Southeast Asia’s farmlands, destroyed crops, and plunged it into darkness for a week. Both events—Napoleon’s defeat and the eruption—had monumental impacts on human history. But while a library of scholarship has been devoted to Napoleon’s undoing at Waterloo, the scattered writings on Tambora would scarcely fill your in-tray." - Maitani
Maitani
Five Flood Stories You Didn’t Know About | (A)theologies | Religion Dispatches - http://www.religiondispatches.org/archive...
Five Flood Stories You Didn’t Know About | (A)theologies | Religion Dispatches
"The first known flood story comes from Sumer in the tale of Atra-hasis (19th century, BCE). This story sets the basic elements of the ancient genre: gods try to eradicate humanity, while a flood hero builds a boat to save the animals. A tragicomedy about polytheism starring petty gods who complain like tired parents annoyed by their noisy children. With plans to destroy a boisterous humanity, they are thwarted not once but three times by the flood hero’s personal god and eminent trickster, Enki. With each divine attempt at total genocide, Enki gives the flood hero secret knowledge about which god to appease with a sacrifice. This worked against the first two rounds of disease and drought. However, Enki had to get creative for the third and final attempt. For the deluge, Enki instructs the flood hero to build a boat for family and fauna." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
A well-written article, pleasurable to read, and informative. - Maitani
Maitani
Der Frühling hält Einzug auf meiner Dachterrasse!
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I want a Dachterrasse! - Eivind
ahaha Eivind - ani
:-) This is my favourite season of the year. I can't wait to replant the pots with flowers. It is still a bit too early though, there may be frost in the nights. From May to September, I spend most evenings in my roof garden. - Maitani
Maitani
“There’s a map for that!” Visualizing the Medieval World | medievalfragments - http://medievalfragments.wordpress.com/2014...
“There’s a map for that!” Visualizing the Medieval World | medievalfragments
“There’s a map for that!” Visualizing the Medieval World | medievalfragments
"While we tend to use maps to show distance, medieval maps are more focused on relationships. Probably the most common type of medieval mappa mundi, or world map, was the O-T map (so called because it looks like an O with a T in it) which clearly depicted the continents as the settling places of Noah’s sons Shem (Asia), Japeth (Europe) and Cham (Africa). It was based on Isidore of Seville’s seventh-century description of the physical world." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Cross Stitch Just Got Cool ~ Kuriositas - http://www.kuriositas.com/2014...
Cross Stitch Just Got Cool ~ Kuriositas
"Cross stitch is one of the oldest forms of embroidery in the world. So, it’s little surprise that its reputation is of something rather fusty that your grandmother might enjoy. However, cross stitch has a new fan base and, led by types of Ambra. A 30 year old Italian crafter, stitcher, pattern-designer and nerd she has helped rehabilitate the ancient art and it is now - officially - cool again. If that seems a little tongue in cheek then perhaps it is – one look at Ambra’s amazing designs, however, and you know that there is much truth in what we say. She has created hundreds of patterns all of which can be seen and downloaded on her website, cloudsfactory.net." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Maitani
BBC News - Cambodia: Ancient Angkor temples added to Street View - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Cambodia: Ancient Angkor temples added to Street View
"Cambodia's most famous ancient temple, Angkor Wat, can now be visited virtually on Google Street View, it appears." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Awesome :) - Eivind
Maitani
Literary Review - Jonathan Keates on citrus fruits in Italy - http://www.literaryreview.co.uk/keates_...
Literary Review - Jonathan Keates on citrus fruits in Italy
"The Land Where Lemons Grow: The Story of Italy and Its Citrus Fruit By Helena Attlee (Particular Books 248pp £20)" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Goethe's 'The Apprenticeship of Wilhelm Meister', a neglected masterpiece if ever there was, is known nowadays for a single line from a ballad sung by Mignon, the daughter of a wandering musician. 'Know'st thou the land where the lemon trees bloom?' begins her mysterious song, describing an imagined world of blue skies, marble statues and thunderous waterfalls, not without a lurking... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Where pastoralist met farmer and East met West (Spengler et al. 2014) - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Where pastoralist met farmer and East met West (Spengler et al. 2014)
"Archaeobotanical data from Central Eurasian pastoralist campsites have major implications for our understanding of late prehistoric agriculture across Asia. Sites like Tasbas and Begash illustrate the earliest acquisition of domesticated crops by mobile pastoralists and illustrate their capacity to participate in exchanges that bridged East Asian and Central Asian farming cultures by the early third millennium BC." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Mobile pastoralists living in (southern) Central Asian alluvial fans and along the mountainous spine of Central Eurasia also integrated farming into their own domestic strategies (at least) by the mid second millenniumBC. Their pastoral mobility and the formation of extensive networks throughout the IAMC helped spread particular grain morphotypes and a mixed plant cohort of wheat,... more... - Maitani
Maitani
International Dunhuang Project: Photographs of Samye Monastery in 1935–36 - http://idpuk.blogspot.de/2014...
International Dunhuang Project: Photographs of Samye Monastery in 1935–36
"We have just digitized a series of photographs of Samye monastery taken in 1935–36. These prints are from the papers of F.W. Thomas, Tibetologist and librarian at the India Office Library. They were sent to him by Hugh Richardson, another Tibetologist who was stationed in Tibet as the British Trade Agent for several years. There are two different sets of photos. Richardson posted the first set of thirteen to Thomas in August 1938, explaining that they were taken at a consecration ceremony held at Samye after recent restoration works. Here is the text of Richardson's letter:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Lists of the Best Sentences — Opening, Closing, and Otherwise — in English-Language Novels - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Lists of the Best Sentences — Opening, Closing, and Otherwise — in English-Language Novels - Open Culture
"You’ve almost certainly read all three of these sentences before, or even if you don’t remember the lines in particular, you’ve probably read the famous novels they come from. The American Scholar highlights them as three of the ten finest in English-language literature, alongside other sentences composed by the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Hersey, and Ernest Hemingway. Writing at Poynter.org, Roy Peter Clark explains just what makes these sentences so great, from Joyce’s use of “forge” (“For the narrator it means to strengthen metal in fire. But it also means to fake, to counterfeit, perhaps a gentle tug at [the protagonist's] hubris”) to Austen’s structural elegance (“Who could not admire a sentence with such a clear demarcation beginning, middle, and end?”) to Nabokov’s reflection of his narrator’s self-delusion." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"At The Atlantic, Joe Fassler has separately collected 22 writers’ own favorite novel-opening lines, a list that includes the one from Nabokov’s highly quotable novel and another from later in Joyce’s oeuvre:" - Maitani
The only first line that came to mind when I tried to think of my favorites was: "I come from Des Moines. Somebody had to." :) - Eivind
Sean McBride
A Map of What Every Single Country Leads the World In. | elephant journal - http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014...
A Map of What Every Single Country Leads the World In. | elephant journal
"A few interesting ones: Republic of Ireland leads in quality of life? The U.K leads in fascist groups? And since they didn’t make the map, Lithuania has one of the highest percentages of literate people in the whole world." - Sean McBride from Bookmarklet
I thought Iceland was leading in quality of life. I didn't know we are leading in "almost winning the world cup" either. And the countries I('d) love to visit: smoking, cocaine, Uefa, tourism, apricots and Mohnflesserl! :-) - Maitani
Maitani -- I take it you are an Icelander? - Sean McBride
I like the idea, but alas I am not. :-) - Maitani
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