Sign in or Join FriendFeed
FriendFeed is the easiest way to share online. Learn more »

Maitani › Comments

Maitani
"For a long time French and English novels were content to borrow their titles from the names of their chief characters, and this is how readers first learned of Robinson, Moll, Pamela, Jacques, Tom, Humphry, Tristram, Émile, Evelina, Emma, Oliver, David, and many others. Starting in the late eighteenth century, titles took a descriptive or even predictive turn. There were dangerous liaisons, prides and prejudices, lost illusions, great expectations, crimes and punishments, and other moral or legal considerations. These titles didn’t tell us much, but they hinted at risk and comeuppance, seemed to profess a large wisdom readers might share with the author at the expense of the characters. The novels themselves were not half as moralizing as their titles suggested—most of them were not moralizing at all—but they did seek collusion, appealing to what we thought we knew. We knew, for example, that expectations are great but rarely met. That’s what expectations are; otherwise they would... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Eivind
Nithing pole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...
"A nithing pole (Old Norse: níðstang), sometimes normalized as nithstang or nidstang, was a pole used for cursing an enemy in Germanic pagan tradition. A nithing pole consisted of a long, wooden pole with a recently cut horse head at the end, and at times with the skin of the horse laid over the pole.[1] The nithing pole was directed towards the enemy and target of the curse. The curse could be carved in runes on the pole." - Eivind from Bookmarklet
I'd like to know the meaning/etymology of níð-. - Maitani
I can't find an equivalent word in Norwegian or English that covers all it seems to have meant in Old Norse. A stain on your (and your family's) honor, a social stigma, and also poems and prose talking smack about someone. In Norwegian we still have the term 'nidvise' (nid song) which these days means any text from the talking-smack-about-someone-else department. We no longer have any honor that can be stained :) - Eivind
I guess the whole concept has sort of died out around here. Maybe there are roughly equivalent words in existence in the languages of tribal societies where honor/family honor is still the main social currency? - Eivind
Thank you for your explanation. Having read it, I wonder whether the element níð- might be related to our "Neid" - "envy, grudge". I'll look it up. :-) - Maitani
It is likely that the two words are cognates, phonetically, the German "ei" originates from OHG "i", and the "d"/"ð" may both originate from PIE *-t-. Plus, as you explain the meaning of the Norwegian word, the words may be related semantically. - Maitani
This article took a turn I didn't expect: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... - Stephen Mack from iPhone
What "unexpected turn" did you mean, Stephen? - Maitani
So the Corleones were Germanic pagans. Interesting. - LB's Bubba. The other 1
Maitani, I wasn't expecting all the sexual connotations! - Stephen Mack from iPhone
Heh, yeah, I think I had the same reaction Stephen did. I'd never really imagined Vikings made distinctions between bottoms and tops :D - Victor Ganata
Neat, clean, modern day equivalent, sold here: http://www.toysrus.com/family... (it was the first thing that popped into my head) - April Russo
Ach so, Stephen. :D I overread that part. :-) - Maitani
The Normans ruled Sicily for a while, Bubba. Maybe that part of their culture has been thrown into the mix :) - Eivind
Maitani
BBC News - English explodes in India - and it's not just Hinglish - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - English explodes in India - and it's not just Hinglish
"Anyone who travels beyond Delhi and Mumbai to India's provincial cities will notice English words cropping up increasingly in Hindi conversation. While some of these terms fell out of use in the UK decades ago, others are familiar, but used in bold new ways." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Picture the scene. I'm chatting to a young man named Yuvraj Singh. He's a college student in the Indian city of Dehra Dun. We're talking in Hindi. But every so often there's an English word. It's Hindi, Hindi, Hindi, and then suddenly an English word or phrase is dropped in: "job", "love story" or "adjust"." - Maitani
Maitani
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/world...
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian
"Like almost 60,000 others this year, Brahana decided to brave the Mediterranean sea in order to reach Italy, and therefore Europe. She paid people-smugglers $1,600 (£950), she says, to board a boat packed with more than 300 people. “It’s really hard with a small baby,” she says stoically of a journey that has proved deadly for thousands over the past 20 years. Her boat was intercepted by an Italian navy ship last week and all its passengers taken to safety. The question for them now is what comes next. Brahana, like many of the refugees and migrants landing in Italy, has not yet requested asylum and is not in the care of an official structure. She is waiting for the bus to Rome, where her aunt lives. And then? “I don’t know,” she admits. “I want to work. I can’t live in my country because of the government. We need help but we don’t know where from.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog - http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
"The aristocratic pleasures of April and May have been left far behind in these pages for the month of July.  Set amongst a riot of red flowers (perhaps characteristic of this month) is a roundel in which two peasants are kneeling and harvesting the wheat crop.  Behind them is a peasant’s hut and what may be a cathedral in the background, while overhead, lightning strikes as a summer storm rolls in.   On the next folio, beneath the continuation of saints’ days for June, is a roundel containing a bushy-tailed lion, for the zodiac sign Leo, within a frame of similarly-threatening clouds.  Below him is a shepherd, standing in a rather downcast manner among his flock (he is not as unlucky as our April shepherd, however), which his dog relaxes in the foreground." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
What do you really want to know about the past? « Heavenfield - http://hefenfelth.wordpress.com/2014...
"When you think about the past, what do you really want to know? Do you want to know what people thought and felt, their philosophy or understand their spin? Or, do you really want to know what really happened? What was their world really like, not what they said it was like? Sure we are all a little curious about both, but when push comes to shove, what do you want to know the most? Where will you invest your time?  These are really two very different approaches. I’ll soon be reviewing two books here that both look at nature in the Middle Ages and take opposite approaches." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The best example I have found of these diametrically opposed approaches is on medieval epidemics. Some historians will argue that it doesn’t matter what the disease was, all that matters is its demographic effect. Scientists will argue that you can’t really know anything about the epidemic without trying to characterize it medically/biologically, if not identify it. For many... more... - Maitani
I want to know all of it! I love the multidisciplinary approach to uncovering history :) What I DON'T want is for my ancient history books to focus too much on the history of uncovering the history. I've read a few books with a huge focus on small technical details about different digs, intrigues and scandals in archaeological circles, and the life story of the idle rich patrons. That stuff isn't ancient. It's 200 years old, at most. - Eivind
Agreed. To me it is also important that historians publish the sources of their knowledge, and lay out the uncertainties and limitations that result from limited access or from the nature of the sources. - Maitani
Maitani
"Each year at the Homer Multitext Summer Seminar we introduce a new group of students to the scholarly principles that underlie the Homer Multitext project, which are grounded in the research and fieldwork of Milman Parry and Albert Lord on oral poetry. In addition to talking in a broad way about how the Iliad was composed and transmitted over time, we also think out loud about how our understanding of Homeric poetry as an oral traditional system affects how we interpret the poetry. And each year we ground that discussion by focusing on a particular book of the Iliad. The students create an XML edition of the text and scholia for that book in the Venetus A manuscript, and in a series of sessions we talk as a group about the poetics of that book. This year's book is Iliad 12 and it has led us to discuss such topics as the building of and battle before the Achaean wall (which caused such consternation among Analyst scholars in the 19th and early 20th centuries), the poetics of battle... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
"Why We Can't Learn Like Kids Most of us English speakers can't tell the difference between Seung, Seong and Sung now, but back when we were babies we could. A large body of work shows that babies possess a remarkable ability to distinguish all sounds in all languages. But between six and 12 months of age, they begin homing in on their native language's sounds. They become experts in their own language, and as a consequence they lose their facility with the unfamiliar sounds of foreign languages. As it turns out, it's challenging to regain that ability." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Some of the best data on this phenomenon come from studies of Japanese adults learning to hear the difference between r and l. Why the Japanese? For one, because the r-versus-l problem is notorious; Japanese speakers tend to do little better than chance when attempting to tell their rocks from their locks. Second, they know they have this difficulty, and many will happily volunteer to... more... - Maitani
Maitani
3quarksdaily: Gavrilo Princip, Conspiracy Theories and the Fragility of Cause and Effect - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: Gavrilo Princip, Conspiracy Theories and the Fragility of Cause and Effect
"Ashutosh Jogalekar in Scientfic American (Achille Beltrame's illustration of the June 28, 1914 assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Gavrilo Princip (Image: Wikipedia)):" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"When you read the story of the shots that led to World War 1, what strikes you is how staggering the gulf between cause and effect was, how little it takes for history to change, how utterly subject to accidental and unlikely events the fickle fortunes of men are. Reading the story of Princip and the Archduke, one sometimes gets the feeling of being no more than wood chips being cast adrift on the roaring river of history." - Maitani
Maitani
Mineral fodder - We may think we are the first organisms to remake the planet, but life has been transforming the earth for aeons http://aeon.co/magazin...
lifeminerals147362371.jpg
"One could easily be forgiven for thinking that life bears little connection to rocks. From high-school science curricula to Wikipedia, the institutional separation of geology and biology seems as ingrained today as when the 18th-century Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus first distinguished animals, vegetables, and minerals. After all, what could be more different than a fragrant rose and a cold chunk of granite?" - Maitani
Maitani
"As university students today well know, power-point obsessed lecturers have internalized the idea, drawn from evolutionary biology, that the primary mode of perception for primates is vision. As university students today also well know, this modern pedagogical axiom can suck the life right out of a room. Back in ancient times, or in the 1980s when I first attended university, only the dullest of lecturers required anything so fancy as plastic slides on an overhead projector. Everything was oral, chalkboards were sufficient, and it was wonderful. Or at least I thought it was, the occasional droning aside. My how things have changed. Today it would be unthinkable to deliver a lecture without the aid or crutch of power-point. If the slides are especially busy, students need pay no mind to the babbling person, or reader, who advances them." - Maitani
"Those who study traditional cultures in general and hunter-gatherers in particular are no doubt aware of these issues, but awareness and understanding are two different things. I’ve been groping toward some understanding, inspired in this task initially by Jack Goody’s Domestication of the Savage Mind (1977). While Goody’s classic opened my eyes to these issues, my ears were not opened... more... - Maitani
Walter J. Ong, Orality and Literacy http://occupytampa.org/files... - Maitani
Maitani
"...during the floods papyrus swamps provided a larder of fresh food (birds, fish and game). In the modern world papyrus swamps are key to the development and sustainability of many areas in Africa where the swamps today act as sewage filters." (comment by http://www.salon.com/profile... on the article posted here http://friendfeed.com/history... )
2014-06-27-282.jpg
I have had a papyrus for years, and I keep the pot in standing water. I was really astonished by the fact that water and soil never developed that rotten smell (like other plants when getting too much water), they don't smell at all. - Maitani
Sean McBride
Google's Knowledge Graph Is Showing Step By Step Instructions: Here Are Some Examples - http://searchengineland.com/googles...
Google's Knowledge Graph Is Showing Step By Step Instructions: Here Are Some Examples
"Earlier this year, Google began offering much more detailed answers in the top Knowledge Graph box. Shortly after that was introduced, Google also began expanding those answers into a bulleted list format. We’ve been seeing these bulleted lists, especially in “how-to” like queries for months now and here are some interesting examples." - Sean McBride from Bookmarklet
Interesting. If I make similar queries, I don't get any detailed answers like that yet, don't know whether that generally applies to users in European countries or whether it depends on particular countries. I hope the search expansions will soon be available in Germany. - Maitani
The sample searches worked for me here in the United States -- perhaps this feature is being gradually rolled out around the world. - Sean McBride
For instance, this works: [Google; how to boil eggs http://www.google.com/#q=how+...] - Sean McBride
It works! I just happened to type in the "wrong" questions. "Make French toast" works, and many more, even "make sauerkraut". :-) - Maitani
Looking at the instructions to boil eggs: "Set your timer for the desired time." To find out the desired time, you have to click through. So how does this help? - Betsy
Are there step-by-step instructions for reaching the Singularity? - Professor A.I.
Betsy: the feature needs to be refined, but it's 80% of the way there. - Sean McBride
Professor A.I.: 1. Let DARPA continue to fund hundreds or thousands of projects at the cutting edge of machine intelligence, deep learning and cognitive computing. 2. Shake vigorously. - Sean McBride
As long as everyone means the exact same boiled eggs, we're set. - Meg VMeg
They intend to make sure users have to click through now and again, don't they? http://searchengineland.com/google-... - Maitani
Important issue. But the bottom line: Google's empire is going to vastly expand. There is no legal basis on which to prevent Google from presenting universal facts about the world to its users in the most efficient way possible. - Sean McBride
Maitani
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2011...
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg
"Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
The Ancient Egyptian invention that made everything else possible - Salon.com - http://www.salon.com/2014...
The Ancient Egyptian invention that made everything else possible - Salon.com
"The history of Egypt boggles the mind. By any standard the scale of achievement was enormous, but through it all, it seems clear that the economy remained rooted in agriculture. It was the everyday business of the ancient Egyptians to produce food. This they did using a system that was the envy of all. Sandra Postel, Director of the Global Water Policy Project, said that overall, Egypt’s system of basin irrigation proved inherently more stable from an ecological, political, social, and institutional perspective than that of any other irrigation-based society in human history, including the Fertile Crescent of Mesopotamia where a fallow year had to be interposed to rest the land between harvests on land that was also subject to salinization, something that did not happen along the Nile. “Fundamentally … the system sustained an advanced civilization through numerous political upheavals and other destabilizing events over some 5,000 years. No other place on Earth has been in continuous cultivation for so long.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
I'm currently working my way through a rather long lecture series on Egypt's rather long history. I'm all the way up to the 19th dynasty now and 1177 B.C. is on the horizon :) - Eivind
So you've already learned about the Battle of Kadesh? - Maitani
I am quite interested in Egypt's relations with Mittani and with the Hittites. - Maitani
Aye. I've had quite a bit to do with the Hittites lately. Mittani's been around, too. To get back to papyrus: When the Hittites switch from clay tablets to papyrus, we stop hearing from them. Thanks, Egypt :-P - Eivind from Android
:D, Eivind! Btw., the article mainly deals with the part papyrus boats and ropes play in the evolving Egyptian civilization prior to 3,000 BCE: "By far the most ingenious item that emerged from that period was rope, without which building boats and houses would have been more difficult, not to mention the erection of monuments for which Egypt is remembered in later times." It is fascinating to read. - Maitani
I read it, and I agree :) - Eivind
Maitani
4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus - http://www.livescience.com/46513-a...
4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus
"An ancient burial containing chariots, gold artifacts and possible human sacrifices has been discovered by archaeologists in the country of Georgia, in the south Caucasus." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Archaeologists discoveredthe timber burial chamber within a 39-foot-high (12 meters) mound called a kurgan. When the archaeologists reached the chamber they found an assortment of treasures, including two chariots, each with four wooden wheels." - Maitani
Maitani
“In the Ukraine”? “In Ukraine”? “On Ukraine”?—Clarifying the Issue - Languages Of The World | Languages Of The World - http://languagesoftheworld.info/russia-...
“In the Ukraine”? “In Ukraine”? “On Ukraine”?—Clarifying the Issue - Languages Of The World | Languages Of The World
"As was noted above, some Ukrainians think that the use of the definite article with the name of their country makes it sound as if Ukraine is not a sovereign state. This idea, however, is mistaken. A number of current and former names of sovereign states, including those of the two Cold War superpowers, contain “the”: the United States and the Soviet Union. Note also the Netherlands, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the People’s Republic of China. Some writers have suggested that the definite article is used with sovereign state names only if they are plural. This stipulation might be said to work for the United States, the Netherlands and the Philippines, but “the United States” has generally been conceived as a singular entity since the Civil War (before the 1860s, one would usually write “the United States are…,” whereas since that time the correct usage is “the United States is…” Other countries that... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Young Leonard Cohen Reads His Poetry in 1966 (Before His Days as a Musician Began) - | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Young Leonard Cohen Reads His Poetry in 1966 (Before His Days as a Musician Began) - | Open Culture
"Many a singer-songwriter who first rose to prominence in the 1960s has taken the label of “poet,” usually applied by adoring fans, no doubt to the objection of a fair few serious poetry enthusiasts. But who among them could deny Leonard Cohen’s status as a poet? Though best known as a musician, Cohen has also racked up indisputable writerly credentials, having published not just the novels Beautiful Losers and The Favorite Game but many books of poetry including Death of a Lady’s Man, Let Us Compare Mythologies, and Flowers for Hitler. Some of them include not just poems written as poems but song lyrics — or perhaps works that began as songs but became poems. Surely his albums contain songs that began as poems. Those interested in figuring out Cohen’s simultaneous development as a poet and songwriter would do well to listen to his early poetry readings, like that of “Prayer for Messiah” at the top of the post." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
You should listen to the 92nd Y poetry readings <3 - Maitani
Maitani
Why Germany Wants to Look Like Its Soccer Team - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society - http://www.psmag.com/navigat...
Why Germany Wants to Look Like Its Soccer Team - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society
"In a country where immigrants haven’t always been welcome, politicians champion Die Mannschaft as an integrated model of diversity." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"On the evening of June 25, 2008, Germany played one of the most-hyped soccer games in its long, proud history: The semi-finals of the 2008 UEFA European Championship. It wasn’t the country’s most important match—by 2008 Germany had already won both the European Championship and the World Cup three times—but the match carried a new kind of cultural importance. Germany’s opponent was... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Leo Tolstoy's Family Recipe for Macaroni and Cheese - | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Leo Tolstoy's Family Recipe for Macaroni and Cheese - | Open Culture
"In 1874, Stepan Andreevich Bers published The Cookbook and gave it as a gift to his sister, countess Sophia Andreevna Tolstaya, the wife of the great Russian novelist, Leo Tolstoy. The book contained a collection of Tolstoy family recipes, the dishes they served to their family and friends, those fortunate souls who belonged to the aristocratic ruling class of late czarist Russia. Almost 150 years later, this cookbook has been translated and republished by Sergei Beltyukov. Available in an inexpensive Kindle format ($3.99), Leo Tolstoy’s family recipe book features dozens of recipes, everything from Tartar Sauce and Spiced Mushrooms (what’s a Russian kitchen without mushrooms?), to Stuffed Dumplings and Green Beans à la Maître d’Hôtel, to Coffee Cake and Viennese Pie. The text comes with a translation, too, of Russian weights and measures used during the period. One recipe Mr. Beltyukov provided to us (which I didn’t see in the book) is for the Tolstoy’s good ole Mac ‘N’ Cheese dish. It goes something like this:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
It was the best of cheese, it was the worst of cheese. - Stephen Mack
I love the photo because it reminds me of the Russian hospitality I experienced years ago. :-) - Maitani
Maitani
Note to David Brat: Free Markets Are Not Calvinist | Religion Dispatches - http://religiondispatches.org/note-to...
"The confusion may go back even farther than Max Weber’s “Protestant ethic” thesis, all the way to the 16th century, when the Protestant reformer John Calvin waxed poetic in his Institutes of the Christian Religion about the importance of “freedom” in a Christian’s life. A Christian is no longer a slave to the law—neither the Torah nor the laws of the Roman Church. The Christian is free from condemnation, free to obey God joyfully, and free to make individual choices about earthly matters—even including usury (lending money at interest). So thus far it may seem that Calvin put his stamp of approval on the market free-for-all that’s so popular with bankers, business owners, financiers, and Brat voters." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"But this is nothing like John Calvin’s own thinking. Despite his love of freedom, Calvin also had what we might call “Talibanesque” tendencies, since he believed in the sovereignty of God and the total depravity of humankind; humans are so sinful that even believers get it wrong most of the time and thus need strict rules to save them from themselves and others. In particular, Calvin worried about how the rich and powerful would use their privileged positions to exploit the poor and vulnerable." - Maitani
You shouldn't read Calvin's texts literally. If you just read between the lines and interpret the stuff that is meant to be interpreted rather than just taken at face value and disregard the stuff that absolutely doesn't fit this ideology, you'll find that Calvin was, indeed, a right-wing, free-market wingnut libertarian. - Eivind
I haven't read Calvin yet, but I have no doubt about that, Eivind. I wonder who else we could monopolize as free market libertarians with this approach. :-) - Maitani
Nelson "Laissez-faire" Mandela would be a respectable addition :) - Eivind from Android
Tamara J. B.
Welcome to the world, Marina Skye! Our beautiful daughter came into the world at 3:00. She weighs 5 lbs 7oz and was 18" with a very healthy set of lungs. I'm madly in love!
20140621_150953.jpg
Show all
EEEEEEEEEE!!! Congratulations!!!! <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 - vicster: full-bodied
Welcome, Marina. - Pete
And Happy Birthday to Miss M, too! :-D - vicster: full-bodied
Yay! Congratulations and welcome, Marina! <3 - Jennifer Dittrich
Congratulations!!! - Elena
w00t!!! :-) - Steven Perez from Android
Congratulations, Tam and Adam! And welcome, Marina! - Stephan Planken from iPhone
Hooray!!! - Katy S
So exciting! - Anne Bouey
Yaaaay! - Kirsten from Android
Congratulations! - John (bird whisperer)
CONGRATS, yay yay yay! Welcome Marina! - Stephen Mack
THE BABBY IS HERE!!!!! Congratulations!!!!1111!!!!! xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxox - Melly
<3 - Johnny from iPhone
Awwww! Welcome from Georgia, Marina! - Soup in a TARDIS
Woohooo!!!! - Mo Kargas
Marina!! Congratulations, Tam & Adam. :) - Micah from FFHound(roid)!
<3 <3 <3 Awesome!!!!! :))) - WoH: Professor MOTHRA
Hooorayyy! - Eric - For You Wack MCs! from iPhone
Congrats! - Rodfather from Android
SO happy for all of you!!!!! - MAMA VAL#GOSCARLETTGO
Mazel tov, goddammit! - Akiva
Congratulations! And welcome, Marina. - Betsy
Look at you and your baby girl, boo! Another FF baby is born. Much love to you and Adam and wee miss Marina! - Corinne L
Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte from Android
Beautiful baby!! <3 💓💜 - Zulema ❧ spicy cocoa tart from Android
:D O HAI! - Glen Campbell
Thanks, everyone! We're over the moon happy and excited. <3 - Tamara J. B. from FFHound(roid)!
Congratulations! And talk about punctual...3PM on the dot! :-) - CAJ hates pants from Android
Now Tam = Tamara, Adam, and Marina. The TAM Fam! - CAJ hates pants from Android
Yay! Congrats!!!! You both look fabulous!!!!! <3 - Yvonne from FFHound!
Gratz!!! - Lnorigb from FFHound!
Congratulations to the whole family! - Tinfoil 2.0
Congrats!!!!! She is beautiful. - Mary Carmen
congratulations, :) - chaz2b
Welcome, Marina! Tam, you look wonderful! - Mary B: #TeamMonique
Wonderful, and on the first day of summer the world will forever celebrate her birthday. - Steve C
Congratulations on your new addition! :) - Jenny H. from Android
Congrats to the parents, and welcome to the tiny one :) - Eivind from Android
Congratulations! - Maitani
I keep coming back to look again and again. She's so precious and squishy!!!! - Melly from FFHound!
yayyyyy!!!! - Sir Shuping is just sir
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!! Squuuuuueeeeeeeeeeeee!!! love to you three! - t-ra: WeirdnessSandwich
Maitani
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The Mystery of Language evolution (Hauser et al. 2014) - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The Mystery of Language evolution (Hauser et al. 2014)
Marc D. Hauser, Charles Yang, Robert C. Berwick, Ian Tattersall, Michael Ryan, Jeffrey Watumull, Noam Chomsky and Richard Lewontin - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Understanding the evolution of language requires evidence regarding origins and processes that led to change. In the last 40 years, there has been an explosion of research on this problem as well as a sense that considerable progress has been made. We argue instead that the richness of ideas is accompanied by a poverty of evidence, with essentially no explanation of how and why our... more... - Maitani
you can download a provisional pdf of the full article here http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal... - Maitani
"This is the essential problem of serial order: the existence of generalized schemata of action which determine the sequence of specific acts, acts which in themselves or in their associations seem to have no temporal valence. In evolutionary terms, Lashley is suggesting that a key innovation, maybe THE key innovation, was learning to map structured ideas onto structured action plans (=... more... - Maitani
Language Log recommends a work setting forth a different approach (which sounds fascinating to me): Karl Lashley, The Problem of Serial Oder in Behavior (1951). Here is the pdf: http://t.s-f-walker.org.uk/pubsebo... - Maitani
Maitani
Does learning a second language lead to a new identity? | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Does learning a second language lead to a new identity? | OUPblog
"But what if we took a different approach. Rather than ask what makes learning a second language so hard, let’s ask what makes it easier." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"One group of successful language learners includes those who write in a second language. For example, Joseph Conrad, born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski, wrote Heart of Darkness in English, a language he spoke with a very strong accent. He was of Polish origin and considered himself to be of Polish origin his entire life. Despite his heavy accent, he is regarded by many as one of the... more... - Maitani
Maitani
BBC News - The day trip that devastated New York's Little Germany - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - The day trip that devastated New York's Little Germany
Show all
"On a fine summer's day 110 years ago, more than 1,000 people died in a disaster in New York. It was a massive blow to the city's German community, which never fully recovered." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
This Is Your Brain on Writing by Carl Zimmer - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2014...
"A novelist scrawling away in a notebook in seclusion may not seem to have much in common with an NBA player doing a reverse layup on a basketball court before a screaming crowd. But if you could peer inside their heads, you might see some striking similarities in how their brains were churning." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
3quarksdaily: THE HISTORIES OF HERODOTUS, TRANSLATED BY TOM HOLLAND - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: THE HISTORIES OF HERODOTUS, TRANSLATED BY TOM HOLLAND
Steve Donoghue at The Quarterly Conversation: "For centuries, men of letters and plenty of his fellow historians took great pleasure in reducing the prototypical chronicler, Herodotus of Halicarnassus, to the status of a mere wonder-monger, the garrulous and credulous counter-weight to the austere objectivity of his younger contemporary and immediate successor, Thucydides. In fact, it was a thinly veiled slight in Thucydides’s great work on the Peloponnesian War that got the tradition of Herodotus-bashing started; after that, a bitterly moralizing essay by Plutarch kept it going, it flourished in the Renaissance, and it persisted into modern times. Even fifty years ago, the great classicist Peter Green was gently mocking the standard reduction of “The Father of History”:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Here is Herodotus: a garrulous, credulous collector of sailors’ stories and Oriental novelle, ahistorical in method, factually inaccurate, superstitious and pietistic, politically innocent, his guiding motto cherchez la femme et n’oubliez pas le Dieu" - Maitani
laura x
Things you feel like you're the only person in the world who has read/seen/listened to. Go!
"Elsie Piddock Skips in Her Sleep" by Eleanor Farjeon; The Good Master and The Singing Tree by Kate Seredy - laura x
Emmet Swimming - Something like this http://www.youtube.com/watch... "Listen to the River". They had one hit (Arlington to Boston), but I really like all of their stuff. - Joe
Books, e-author John Locke; Donovan Creed series. Music: Gypsy Soul and Sass Jordan - Janet from FFHound!
Justin said, "How To Build Military Grade Suppressors, by Keith Anderson" Me, The Gooseberry Bluff Community College of Magic, by David Schwartz. - Jenica
The Skipper Chuck tv show for kids that was broadcast from a studio in Miami in the 1950s-1970s. - Stephen Francoeur
There's a video with a bunch of segments that I must have seen about a bajillion times in grade school; the first segment was an animated short called "Why Man Creates" (yes, it was the 1970s). - Catherine Pellegrino
Sister by Jim Lewis. I need to reread it to see if it holds up after 20 years, but I LOVED it. I've never known anybody else to have read it. https://www.goodreads.com/book... - kaijsa
Lucky: http://www.imdb.com/title... . Wife and I loved this program. I think we were the only ones. Superfolks: http://www.amazon.com/dp... . The copyright is 1977, so I must have been around 15 or 16 but I could have sworn I was younger. Either way, had my mom known of it's content (like explicit s-e-x), she wouldn't have let me read it.... more... - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte
Also, this is a very good thread starter. - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte
Since leaving Canada, the series Slings and Arrows. Also the CD "Horse Soldier! Horse Soldier!" by Corb Lund. (P.S. Jenica, I read Gooseberry Bluff!). - Soup in a TARDIS
I was telling someone at work a few days ago about Slings and Arrows. - Betsy
Every American Doctor Who fan has had the "I thought I was the only one who knew about Doctor Who" moment. - Betsy
Who? - Joe
I like, Art…Vandelay. Art Vandelay? He’s an obscure writer. Beatnik, from the village. - Stephen Mack
I <3 <3 <3 <3 Slings and Arrows, Betsy. Ever since learning about it (when I lived in Canada) I've been promoting it ceaselessly. - Soup in a TARDIS
Trixie Belden books. - Jaclyn aka spamgirl
Jonny Chase: Secret agent of space (70s radio drama) - DJF from Android
@Soup: as a fan of Forever Knight, KF-TLC and Due South, how could I not know about Slings and Arrows? :-) - Betsy
The historical novels- for children- of Cynthia Harnett - Pete
Dinosaurs. I make mention of this every few months, and it's like nobody remembers that show. Also Tucker, is another one. - NOT THE CRICKET
The sitcom family dinosaurs Dinosaurs? I remember that :) - Pete
NOT THE MAMA - kendrak
Indeed. Of course, I'm normally talking to people my age or younger. So they probably didn't see it at all. - NOT THE CRICKET
So glad I'm among Slings & Arrows fans! It's about as good a TV show as I can fathom existing. Well, I'd watch anything with Paul Gross in it :) - Lily
Aw, I remember THE GOOD MASTER - loved that book, and haven't thought of it for yonks. - barbara fister
Only an American would think they're the only person who's listened to Corb Lund ;-) - DJF from Android
Probably Reynke de Vos or Til Eulenspiegel. In English, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. - kendrak
For a time, Waif called me "Not The Mama". Wife pleaded ignorance - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte
There's MoTo's new nickname. - NOT THE CRICKET
Jaclyn, I loved Trixie Belden! - Jenica from iPhone
Jimminy - "so let it be written" - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte
Jenica - until the internet came around, I was half convinced I'd made them up. :P - Jaclyn aka spamgirl
from my childhood: Wonderama and The Magic Garden. - ♫Jorge Covert, Trainer♫
Die Strudlhofstiege by Heimito von Doderer, a novel I love. - Maitani
Pete, I read some Cynthia Harnett. My grandmother had a great many of them. (I know of Slings & Arrows and Trixie Belden and have seen a few episodes of Dinosaurs, in part). - laura x
My TV shows would be The Tomorrow People and Against the Odds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...). - laura x
Read: David Graham - Down to a Sunless Sea, Jean Karl - The Turning Place, Strange Tomorrow, But We Are Not of Earth. Re: Dinosaurs - I remember when it was on and I've been watching it on Netflix recently! - ellbeecee
Ooh, I remember Trixie Belden! Also Cherry Ames. - ellbeecee
LBC--I've got the first 8 Cherry Ames books at home. :) They've reissued them. - Hedgehog
I know - I've got the old editions though. :) - ellbeecee
The Moomin books. - barbara fister
Now, Secret Agent, let us talk ;) Although I saw the TV adaptation before I read the books. - Pete
Old Sci Fi UFO and Space:1999 - ♫Jorge Covert, Trainer♫
I loved Home Movies! - kendrak
Night Court. - Hedgehog
"The Brown Bird," as sung by Maxine Sullivan (on the B side of her version of "Blue Skies"). - laura x
@Jorge: I have the Space: 1999 DVD box set. - Betsy
And I remember watching UFO around the same time. - Betsy
@Hedgehog: I was telling them at work this week about the Turbo Shatner 2000. - Betsy
Blake's 7 (except for Sarah, of course) - maʀtha
@Martha, are you familiar with the Bizarro 7 zines? http://fanlore.org/wiki... - Betsy
Fan of Trixie Belden, Dinosaurs, and Night Court -----> - The Lunatic Ur Lookin 4 from Android
Here's my list (for now): Herman's Head, Jason's Quest by Margaret Laurence, The Juniper Game by Sherryl Jordan. - Marianne
Oooh, also the TV show Pretender. - Hedgehog from Android
Oh, I'm a fan of Spike Jones and the City Slickers. Plenty of folks are familiar with them, but they're all older than I! - The Lunatic Ur Lookin 4 from Android
@Hedgehog: Miss Parker? - Betsy
Mrs. Pigglewiggle - maʀtha
I had not, Betsy - maʀtha
I remember Space 1999! - maʀtha
i have all of the first SPACE:1999 series on DVD. second one was a terrible kiddie show, tho, and discarded nearly everything important to the premise in the name of pandering...which ultimately led to its cancellation. - Big Joe Silence
Most of the Arthur Machen I've read. - Katy S from iPhone
I mostly remember big banks of computers with flashy lights and people in jumpsuits (re Space 1999) - maʀtha
Why do people always think there are jumpsuits in the future? What's wrong with pants and shirt? - maʀtha
there's alot of SPACE:1999 episodes on YouTube. watch the pilot called "Breakaway". - Big Joe Silence
Yes Betsy, that's the one. Martha, I loved Mrs. PiggleWiggle, I still think of it when I am making the bed - Hedgehog from Android
That book I can't remember the title of. =P It was a high fantasy where magicians all had specialties and didn't cross over, and the main hero (?) might have been from one of the disrespected specialties, the one that could talk to animals. His order would have secret conversations by having multiple wizards all basically teleconference into a turtle sitting on the table. And they had a... more... - Andrew C (✔)
ooh, something I watched: "Space Giants", with Goldar Silvar and Gam (see for example: http://youtu.be/rIaJtIAZF_I ) - ellbeecee
that old Lathe of Heaven PBS production. I saw it on PBS when it aired and it inhabited my dreams for years - maʀtha
I remember seeing ads for it and I didn't know what it was but it sounded great and I tried to get my parents to let me watch it but something else the rest of the family wanted to watch was on at the same time and we only had one TV set, as one did back then, so no go. - Betsy
I watched it totally by chance and had no idea what it was or what was happening - maʀtha
agree on … Wonderama!! (wackado, wackado, wackado; lolhusband also watched it growing up, on channel 5). And yes, Cherry Ames, Student Nurse. LOVED Mrs. PiggleWiggle. I bet she shopped at the Piggly Wiggly. I remember, but didn't read Trixie Belden. - Stephan!e•CogSc!L!brar!an
adding: Enid Blyton (tho' I bet the tea eaters have read her). - Stephan!e•CogSc!L!brar!an
I have read SO MUCH Enid Blyton (as well as Cherry Ames). #canadian - Marianne
Buckaroo Banzai. - Betsy
Betsy, I saw that at a con filled with people, and then had all the mutual friends of myself and the friend I went to the con with say, "YOU NEVER SAW THAT UNTIL NOW? HOW!?!?!?" And yet, I still feel that way sometimes too. - Marianne
i saw "Buckaroo Banzai" in the cinema when it was first release. 5 minutes before the credits there was a direct lightning strike on the power to the building and everything blacked out for a moment before the backup lights came on. we exited the emergency doors and there was a tornado outside. i didn't see the whole thing til it was on cable a few years later. - Big Joe Silence
SPECTREMAN. I watched quite a few sentai shows in the late 70s, and that one still surprises people. - Steven Perez
For a very long time, I didn't know anyone else who had watched the BBC production of Gormenghast with Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Steerpike. I started to wonder if I had imagined seeing it. - Katy S
Katy, same! I have the DVD set rolling around the house somewhere. - Jennifer Dittrich
Except for Star Wars (asterisk), Buckaroo Banzai was the first movie I saw multiple times in the theater. My friend Dottie and I were kinda obsessed with it. EDIT: and I found out last year that they actually released the soundtrack ("for like five minutes"). - Betsy
i have that soundtrack. i even posted some of it on FF once. - Big Joe Silence
That must've been before we met on FF or I would've pounced on it. :-) Fortunately, I was able to get a copy of it last year. - Betsy
Herman's Head! I loved that show. :) - Laura
The music of Pavlov's Dog. - Mary B: #TeamMonique
What's Alan Watching? - Betsy
My Secret Identity. - Betsy
My Secret Identity! My sibs and I used to sing the theme song to that show. - Marianne
I watched Herman's Head and My Secret Identity! - Andrew C (✔)
The Charmings. - The Lunatic Ur Lookin 4 from Android
I remember that, but I didn't watch it. Hang on, it's the sitcom version of Once Upon a Time! Sort of. - Betsy
Oh, also for movies, The World of Henry Orient and A Little Romance. And has anyone else read The Blue Cat of Castletown or The Wheel on the School? - laura x
Wheel on the School, yes! - maʀtha
Another that sticks in my mind is Paddle-to-the-Sea, of which there was a riveting (at least to my very young self) film - maʀtha
Oh, my dad loves the book Paddle to the Sea and gave a copy of it last year to Mr. 7yo. - Stephen Francoeur
Anyone here remember the sitcom, ¿Qué Pasa, USA?, which was on PBS in the late 1970s? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... One of the actors in it got his big break in 1983 as Al Pacino's sidekick in Scarface. - Stephen Francoeur
Let No Man Write my Epitaph by Willard Motley. - Jenny H. from Android
Oh god. Paddle to the Sea. - DJF from Android
It might be one of those books like Babar that I *loved* as a kid, but would now cringe upon reading - maʀtha
(Yes to Wheel on the School.) - The Lunatic Ur Lookin 4
This is one not "only one in the world" 'cause these were big at my grade school when I was a kid, but I'm probably the only one here who has read the Comtesse de Segur books. I don't remember much about them except for one random scene. - Betsy
My grandmother got the book Paddle-to-the-Sea into an episode of Northern Exposure. (I had no idea there was a film, but I still love the book.) - laura x
OH. John Verney's Ismo. My youthful introduction to anarchism. What a great book. - barbara fister
(I read Trixie Belden! :)) - Jenny H. from Android
Fargo the show. - MAMA VAL#GOSCARLETTGO
The band 9353 - Gabrielle
I thought I was the only who lurved John Bellairs until I met Amanda. - Jenny H. from Android
Lila Downs! - Jenny H. from Android
For music, I'll go solo work by bassists from famous bands: Geezer Butler, John Entwistle, John Paul Jones. For books, how about early Norman Spinrad like Men in the Jungle or Bug Jack Barron. Also probably not too many have read any of the Matt Helm books. - John Dupuis
When I was a kid I loved this Disney movie called The Challengers about a girl who masquerades as a boy so she can be in a band. I also had this VHS tape that was called something like "The Kids' Encyclopedia" and it had short video segments on things like learning how to mime and how to breakdance and how to speak a secret language called Ob. My brother and I LOVED that videotape. - Laura Krier
I also listened to a band called Butt Trumpet in high school. Super classy, as you can imagine. Very, very few people in my life have heard of Butt Trumpet. - Laura Krier
Oh AND my brother and I constantly watched this movie called Tommy Tricker and the Stamp Traveller that I think was Canadian. I loved that movie. - Laura Krier
Oh, ok, The Challengers was NOT a DIsney movie. And it was also Canadian. No idea why we watched so many Canadian movies when I was a kid. - Laura Krier
Speaking of Canadian shows: this one aired on Saturdays mornings on CBC when I was in library school: Secret Adventures of Jules Verne, with Michael Praed. - Betsy
oh, and I LOVED Dinosaurs. "Not the Mama!!" - Stephan!e•CogSc!L!brar!an
What a great throwback question, Stephen, yes I remember Que Pasa USA? with it's catchy theme song. And Dinosaurs all of the in jokes about the environmental future of the earth. And how about High Feather? - ♫Jorge Covert, Trainer♫
Kelly and Amanda, my grade school once got to have a conference call with John Bellairs! - laura x from iPhone
I lived outside of Marshall MI where all the Bellairs books were set :) Philosopher and I went there to visit last summer - Hedgehog
Ooh, I got one. “Who Am I This Time?” It was on American Playhouse on PBS in 1982. It was the very first time I saw (or noticed) Susan Sarandon and Christopher Walken in anything. It was great. It’s still the first thing that comes to mind whenever I think of either of them. - Betsy
I used to watch Brimstone. I was going to say I have it on VHS, but I threw out most of my home tapes this week. - Betsy
Okavango. - Betsy
A Fine Romance (aka, Ticket to Ride) with Christopher Cazenove and Margaret Whitton. Except for a commercial, YouTube only has it in German, which doesn't help me any. (Originally, the lead was going to be Anthony Andrews, but shooting was delayed by the TV writers' strike and he had to be elsewhere by the time it got resolved.) - Betsy
"Tales From The Dark Side". there was also that werewolf show on FOX in the 80s where the protagonist would get a bloody pentagram in the palm of his hand just before changing each time. i forget the name. was bummed out when it went off the air. - Big Joe Silence
Yeah, the one with Chuck Connors as Janos Skorzeny (I recognized that they borrowed the name from Night Stalker). It was called Werewolf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... It'd forgotten about that one. - Betsy
How about The Phoenix, with Judson Scott? - Betsy
Starman, TV series with Robert Hays. - Betsy
A few animated movies from when I was young - Gandahar, The Devil and Daniel Mouse, The Sea Prince and the Fire Child. - Jennifer Dittrich
Jennifer, I loved the devil and daniel mouse. - Marianne
Maitani
"How do you hear the call of the poet to the Muse that opens every epic poem? The following is extract from Barry B. Powell’s new free verse translation of The Odyssey by Homer. It is accompanied by two recordings: one of the first 105 lines in Ancient Greek, the other of the first 155 lines in the new translation. How does your understanding change in each of the different versions?" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Sing to me of the resourceful man, O Muse, who wandered far after he had sacked the sacred city of Troy. He saw the cities of many men and he learned their minds. He suffered many pains on the sea in his spirit, seeking to save his life and the homecoming of his companions. But even so he could not save his companions, though he wanted to, for they perished of their own folly—the... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Egyptologist unravels ancient mystery -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Egyptologist unravels ancient mystery -- ScienceDaily
"It is one of the greatest archaeological mysteries of all times: the disappearance of a Persian army of 50,000 men in the Egyptian desert around 524 BC. A professor has now unearthed a cover-up affair and solved the riddle." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Herodotus It must have been a sand storm, writes the Greek historian Herodotus. He tells the story of the Persian King Cambyses, who entered the Egyptian desert near Luxor (then Thebes) with 50,000 men. The troops supposedly never returned; they were swallowed by a sand dune. A fantastic tale that was long the subject of many debates." - Maitani
Other ways to read this feed:Feed readerFacebook