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Maitani › Comments

Maitani
"In a 2010 NYT “On Language” column, Grant Barrett traced the claim that “cellar door” is the most beautiful phrase in English back as far as 1905 1903. I posted on the phrase a few years ago ("The Romantic Side of Familiar Words"), suggesting that there was a reason why linguistic folklore fixed on that particular phrase, when you could make the same point with other pedestrian expressions like linoleum or oleomargarine:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"…The undeniable charm of the story — the source of the enchantment that C. S. Lewis reported when he saw cellar door rendered as Selladore — lies the sudden falling away of the repressions imposed by orthography … to reveal what Dickens called "the romantic side of familiar things." … In the world of fantasy, that role is suggested literally in the form of a rabbit hole, a wardrobe, a... more... - Maitani
Maitani
International Dunhuang Project: IDP 20 Event: Public Lectures and Reception - http://idpuk.blogspot.de/2014...
International Dunhuang Project: IDP 20 Event: Public Lectures and Reception
"Over a century of archaeology on the eastern Silk Road has resulted in thousands of textile finds, preserved by the dry desert air. In their variety — of material, dyes, designs and weaves — they demonstrate the richness of cultural and technical exchanges among the peoples of the Silk Road." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Aegeus - Society for Aegean Prehistory: Shifting boundaries: The transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean under a new light - http://www.aegeussociety.org/en...
Aegeus - Society for Aegean Prehistory: Shifting boundaries: The transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean under a new light
"The aim of the present paper is to propose some synchronizations, mainly taking into consideration the typology of pottery. The period of our focus is the early Late Bronze Age and the data presented come from the Mainland, Crete and the Cyclades. Ceramic data from different places are combined, offering interesting correlations in terms of relative chronology. Emphasis is given to the dating systems proposed by some scholars, like those of Warren, Hankey and Dietz, since they have greatly influenced the literature and are still being used widely. We are particularly interested in the synchronization of the Mainland with Crete on a ceramic basis and especially the period of the late Middle and early Late Bronze Age." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
See The Guidonian Hand, the Medieval System for Reading Music, Get Brought Back to Life - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
See The Guidonian Hand, the Medieval System for Reading Music, Get Brought Back to Life - Open Culture
"In the 11th century, a monk known as Guido of Arezzo, began to use the “Guidonian hand” as way to teach medieval music singers his hexachord, or six-note scales. Arezzo, who had also devised the modern musical notation system, had noticed that singers struggled to remember the various Gregorian chants that the monastic orders performed in the monasteries. To help their memorization, Guido decided to take the first syllable in each line of the well known hymn Ut Queant Laxis, and created a hexachord, or six note scale, that singers familiar with the hymn already knew: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la. The hand, shown above, was a map of the musical notes in this hexachord system, with each note associated with a particular joint. In all, the Guidonian hand ranges almost three octaves. Although it had fallen out of use for the past few centuries, the Guidonian hand seems to be making a comeback. Here’s a video of the method in action, forwarded our way by Anton Hecht, an Open Culture reader:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Sean McBride
Isaac Newton’s College Notebook http://tm.durusau.net/?p=51629
Patrick Durusau finds gems such as this. - Maitani
Amazing, eh? - Sean McBride
Absolutely. I even love to flip through these pages. - Maitani
Maitani
I can't access my feedly reading list any more.
Now I consider using another feed reader. - Maitani
I like the way The Old Reader looks. It's free up to 100 feeds, but they keep changing it, so I'm not that confident it will stay that way. Fast and usable atm., at least. - Eivind
Thank you, Eivind. I just realized that feedly will work perfectly as soon as I have replaced my old PC which is still running on XP. - Maitani
Maitani
Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia: Relationship between Siberian, North American languages -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia: Relationship between Siberian, North American languages -- ScienceDaily
"Evolutionary analysis applied to the relationship between North American and Central Siberian languages may indicate that people moved out from the Bering Land Bridge, with some migrating back to central Asia and others into North America, according to a paper published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 12, 2014 by Mark Sicoli, from Georgetown University and Gary Holton from University of Alaska Fairbanks." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Language trees can't be reconstructed as far back as the time of these migrations, so linguists are not able to contribute to the archeological and genetic data. Resemblances between words and typological similarities can't prove that two languages are related to each other. - Maitani
Maitani
Amazing drone footage of an erupting volcano - kottke - http://kottke.org/14...
"How this quad-copter shooting HD footage of a volcano erupting in Vanuatu manages to escape the flying chunks of lava is beyond me." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Victor Ganata
So, yeah, it took me a while to figure out that Jupiter is pretty much just "Deus Pater" (God the Father).
Although I guess Dyeus is specifically the Sky God. - Victor Ganata
Basically the word means "bright sky of day". - Maitani
Dyeus is also Zeus. - Maitani
Latin deus is a so called vrddhi derivation of dyeus, meaning "one belonging to the bright sky of day" = a god. - Maitani
What really blows my mind is the connection between PIE dyeus to Sanskrit deva to Tagalog diwa meaning "spirit" specifically in an animistic sense - Victor Ganata
Maitani
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow - http://riowang.blogspot.de/2014...
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow
Pieter Brueghel the Elder: The Hunters in the Snow, 1565 - Piergiorgio Branzi: Alekseevskoe (Moscow), 1962 - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
"Links Hattuscha - die Hauptstadt der Hethiter – Hittite Epigraphic Findings In The Ancient Near East – Monuments of the Hittites – »mehr" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Beggars, buggers, and bigots, part 3 | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Beggars, buggers, and bigots, part 3 | OUPblog
"Unlike so many words featured in this blog, bugger has a well-ascertained origin, but it belongs with the rest of this series because it sheds light on its companions beggar and bigot. The route of bugger should be familiar by now (it is the same as before): from French, to Middle Dutch, and finally, to English. A single, most ingenious, attempt to derive bugger from Greek pygé “buttocks,” with reference to katapygón “sodomite,” has been rejected for good reason: there is no way to explain how a noun popular in Classical Greek made its way into Middle English slang. At present, everybody agrees that the source of bugger is Old French bougre, which in the Middle Ages meant “heretic,” from Bulgarus “Bulgarian.” The Bulgarians were Orthodox Christians, specifically Albigensians, and various sins, including bestiality, were imputed to them. Those rumors spread and were busily cultivated in Southern Europe before, during, and after the Albigensian Crusades (1209-1229), a bloody campaign I... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Iván Abrego
Old Detroit in Stunning Black-and-White Photographs http://www.slate.com/blogs... via @slate
Old Detroit in Stunning Black-and-White Photographs http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2014/03/11/bill_rauhauser_photographs_detroit_in_black_and_white.html via @slate
stunning indeed - Maitani
Maitani
Tolkien’s Influence on Fantasy | Book View Cafe Blog - http://bookviewcafe.com/blog...
Tolkien’s Influence on Fantasy | Book View Cafe Blog
"Here’s Tolkien himself, in a letter to Milton Waldman, probably written about 1951 but never sent: “Do not laugh! But once upon a time (my crest has long since fallen) I had a mind to make a body of more or less connected legend, ranging from the large and cosmogonic, to the level of romantic fairy-story . . .The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama.” * He finishes with “Absurd.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Catholic Magic | Genealogy of Religion - http://genealogyreligion.net/catholi...
"According to early evolutionary anthropologists, magical thinking is supposed to be the province of “primitive” or traditional societies. As some of these societies progressively made their way toward modernity and became “civilized,” magical thinking was supposed to have disappeared. If it did not entirely disappear, then it was supposed to have given way to right proper religion. This is the progressive myth, found in both religious and secular forms, that prevails among civilized folk. The faithful among those folk tell themselves that religion has nothing to do with magic. The positivists among those folk tell themselves that science has replaced, or is inexorably displacing, residuals of magical thinking." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
NeuroLogica Blog » Can Thinking Change Reality - http://theness.com/neurolo...
NeuroLogica Blog » Can Thinking Change Reality
"I love the documentary series, The Day the Universe Changed, by James Burke. It’s a follow up to his equally good, Connections (I know, they have their criticisms, but overall they are very good). The former title is a metaphor – when our collective model of reality changes, for us the universe does change. When we believed the earth was motionless at the center of the universe, that was our reality." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"But Burke was not arguing that the nature of the universe actually changed, just our conception of it. Thinking alone cannot directly change external reality. That is magical thinking." - Maitani
"Such thinking, however, lies at the center of much new age spiritual claims. The secret of The Secret is that you can change your world by wishing. Proponents of such ideas are desperate for scientific validation of their basic premise. Such evidence does not exist. In fact over a century of such research shows rather conclusively that there is no such effect in operation in our world to any significant degree." - Maitani
Maitani
▶ Klaus Nomi's 1978 debut at New Wave Vaudeville, Irving Plaza (NYC) - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
▶ Klaus Nomi's 1978 debut at New Wave Vaudeville, Irving Plaza (NYC) - YouTube
Play
start at 2.50 - Maitani
Maitani
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents - http://www.geocurrents.info/cultura...
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents
"The correlation between ethnicity, (native) language, religion, and voting patterns—and the consequent split into “two Ukraines”—was established over a decade ago; GeoCurrents has discussed those issues here and here. (In fact, economic factors, such as the region’s contribution to GNP, salary levels, and industrial production, can be added to the mix, as they too correlate with the eastern/western Ukraine divide.) However, the easy slippage between ethnic and linguistic terms is problematic in the case of Ukraine because the ethnic and linguistic categories are not coextensive, although they do overlap to a significant degree. Moreover, speaking of the Russian- and Ukrainian-speaking populations are forming as two different language communities is somewhat misleading, particularly for the American audience not used to the high degree of bilingualism found in Ukraine." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The place of the Armenian language in the Indo-European family - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The place of the Armenian language in the Indo-European family
"A very interesting talk at the Library of Congress making a good case for a Greek-Phrygian-Armenian clade within the Indo-European family." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Modern Armenians are quite distinct from modern populations of the Balkans but who knows how both they and the populations of the Balkans have changed since the beginning of the Iron Age when the Phrygians established themselves in Asia Minor? The recent study by Hellenthal et al. did not find any good evidence for recent admixture in Armenians but this might be due to (i) Armenians... more... - Maitani
Maitani
How do British and American attitudes to dictionaries differ? | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
How do British and American attitudes to dictionaries differ? | OUPblog
"For 20 years, 14 of those in England, I’ve been giving lectures about the social power afforded to dictionaries, exhorting my students to discard the belief that dictionaries are infallible authorities. The students laugh at my stories about nuns who told me that ain’t couldn’t be a word because it wasn’t in the (school) dictionary and about people who talk about the Dictionary in the same way that they talk about the Bible. But after a while I realized that nearly all the examples in the lecture were, like me, American. At first, I could use the excuse that I’d not been in the UK long enough to encounter good examples of dictionary jingoism. But British examples did not present themselves over the next decade, while American ones kept streaming in. Rather than laughing with recognition, were my students simply laughing with amusement at my ridiculous teachers? Is the notion of dictionary-as-Bible less compelling in a culture where only about 17% of the population consider religion... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
A Big List of 875 Free Courses From Top Universities: 27,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
A Big List of 875 Free Courses From Top Universities: 27,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures - Open Culture
"In recent months, we’ve enhanced what’s now a list of 875 Free Online Courses from top universities. Here’s the lowdown: Our big list of free courses lets you download audio & video lectures from schools like Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford, Harvard and UC Berkeley. Generally, the courses can be accessed via YouTube, iTunes or university web sites. Right now you’ll find 100 free philosophy courses, 67 free history courses, 90 free computer science courses, and 47 free Physics courses on the list, and that’s just beginning to scratch the surface. Indeed you can also find sections covering Astronomy, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Economics, Engineering, Literature, Math, Political Science, Psychology and Religion. If you want to ballpark it, there are about 27,000 hours of free audio & video lectures here. And if you spend 8 hours per day enriching yourself, you can keep yourself busy for the next 10 years. At no cost." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Here are some highlights from the complete list of free online courses. (As you’ll see, there are a couple of vintage courses by Richard Feynman and Allen Ginsberg, added for good measure.)" - Maitani
875 Free Online Courses from Top Universities http://www.openculture.com/freeonl... - Maitani
Maitani
"This website is devoted to archaeological and historical research in the area of the ancient near-eastern kingdom of "Biainili", better known by the Assyrian name "Urartu". This is the area of Eastern Turkey, North-Western Iran, Armenia and parts of Azerbaijan." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The intention is to inform about recent developments in the area. The contributions of this website are often written in German, sometimes in English. But it is planned to publish them more and more in English for better understanding and distribution." - Maitani
Maitani
The weight of mountains - http://kottke.org/14...
"A beautifully shot short film about mountains, how they form, how they age, and how they die." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
"In 1980, the five most common non-English languages spoken in the United States were (in order): Spanish, Italian, German, French and Polish. Thirty years later, the top five are (in order): Spanish, Chinese, French, Tagalog and Vietnamese." - Maitani
"That change, documented by the U.S. Census and flagged for us by Drew DeSilver of the Pew Research Center, provides a telling window into the demographic changes in the country over the past few decades. Check out this chart that details how the 17 most common non-English languages in 1980 have fared over the past 30 years. (Click the chart for a bigger image.)" - Maitani
Maitani
Your face says it all? Not so fast -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Your face says it all? Not so fast -- ScienceDaily
"New research calls into question the very foundations of emotion science. It's a con­cept that had become uni­ver­sally under­stood: humans expe­ri­ence six basic emotions -- happiness, sad­ness, anger, fear, dis­gust, and surprise -- and use the same set of facial move­ments to express them. What's more, we can rec­og­nize emo­tions on another's face, whether that person hails from Boston or Borneo. The only problem with this con­cept, according to new research, is that it isn't true at all. Researchers have found that even basic human emotions are in fact not universally perceived." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Here's how the fal­sity came to be under­stood as fact. In the 1970s, a young psy­chol­o­gist named Paul Ekman trav­eled to Papua New Guinea to test whether emo­tions were uni­ver­sally expe­ri­enced and expressed as he sus­pected. To test his hypoth­esis, he looked at whether people rec­og­nized the same emo­tions in facial expres­sions around the world. Was a scowling face always clas­si­fied as angry regard­less of the observer's cul­tural back­ground? A pouting face as sad?" - Maitani
Maitani
Etymology of 'beggar', part 2: A connection to Beguines? | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Etymology of 'beggar', part 2: A connection to Beguines? | OUPblog
"The final sentence in the essay posted in January was not a statement but a question. We had looked at several hypotheses on the origin of the verb beg and found that none of them carried conviction. It also remained unclear whether beg was a back formation on beggar or whether beggar arose as a noun agent from the verb. Today we will examine the ideas connecting beggar with the religious order of the Beguines." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"One guess traces Beguine to French beige “gray.” This idea has little to recommend it. Even if the Beguines and Beghards wore gray clothes, this color could not be distinctive enough for giving the name to the orders. Monks (and the Beguines/Beghards were not nuns and monks) and many other people preaching moderation and the virtues of early Christianity, quite naturally, did not... more... - Maitani
potrebbe anche essere - Elia Spallanzani
It is exciting to read how he explores possible explanations that finally turn out to be the wrong track or can't be proved right or wrong. It must be frustrating though that it is often impossible to achieve reliable results. - Maitani
Maitani
“Mustard After Dinner”, Or Are Spain’s Mealtimes Climate-Related? | GeoCurrents - http://www.geocurrents.info/cultura...
“Mustard After Dinner”, Or Are Spain’s Mealtimes Climate-Related? | GeoCurrents
“Mustard After Dinner”, Or Are Spain’s Mealtimes Climate-Related? | GeoCurrents
"In a recent article in the New York Times, Jim Yardley discussed the proposal by the Spanish government to end the siesta tradition and switch to a meal- and worktime pattern “closer to a 9‑to-5 timetable”. Such a reform would also “move Spain out of the time zone that includes France, Germany and Italy” and into a geographically more appropriate zone that includes Portugal and Britain. In response, Slate’s L.V. Anderson wrote that, contrary to the Yardley’s assumption, the Spanish mealtime pattern may be better for “personal productivity”, particularly for those who “like to eat” or “are not a morning person”. Both Yardley and Anderson seem to assume that the late-meal pattern is unique to “Spain, Land of 10 P.M. Dinners” (as the New York Times headline calls it) and is due to the country’s climate. This assertion is not entirely true, however, as people in Italy and France traditionally dine relatively late in the evening as well. Rick Steves’ guidebook to Rome tells us that: “[The... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
What are the schedules like in Spain for young kids? Do school kids go to school later than the rest of the world, and also have 10pm dinners? Or is that just adults? - Stephen Mack from iPhone
Italian here. Never ever eat dinner before 2030. Actually as a kid also not too often after 2030. We have strong cultural variations across regions, but I think dinner time it's the same for the whole country as TV schedule is based on that. Now I live in Paris and in most of the (hipster) resto in my neighborhood dinner is from 21 to midnight. - d☭snake
Dasnake, I'd personally much prefer that schedule over the typical American schedule. - Stephen Mack from iPhone
(school started 8 or 830 am) - d☭snake
Dasnsake, I'm italian too and in Milan we generally eat around 19,30-20 - Ubikindred
in milan they are deluded to be nordic celtics (ok kidding, I was aware of our differences between regions but I didn't think it involved also dinner time .. Ubi but prime TV time is 2030, why?) - d☭snake
Actually prime TV share slowly shifted to be around 21-21.30 (and I hate this!). Concerning dinner time in Turis is typiccaly around 19-19.30. And when I'm visiting my wife's family in Puglia we generally have dinner around 21-21.30 (well, maybe the fact that it happens during summer may affect this scheduling...) - Dario
Maitani
Bavarian Palace Department | Würzburg Residenz | Tour | Treppenhaus - http://www.residenz-wuerzburg.de/englisc...
Bavarian Palace Department | Würzburg Residenz | Tour | Treppenhaus
Bavarian Palace Department | Würzburg Residenz | Tour | Treppenhaus
Bavarian Palace Department | Würzburg Residenz | Tour | Treppenhaus
"Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, summoned specially from Venice for the purpose, decorated the vault in 1752/53 with the largest ceiling fresco ever painted. With great artistic sensitivity he depicted the exotic, magical worlds of the continents of America, Asia and Africa, personified by regal female figures. The highlight of the composition is the allegory of Europe with the Würzburg court as a centre of the arts. The painting, which measures around 600 square metres, is fused into a whole with the sky inhabited by the ancient gods in the centre." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
First Americans Lived on Bering Land Bridge for Thousands of Years - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
First Americans Lived on Bering Land Bridge for Thousands of Years - Scientific American
First Americans Lived on Bering Land Bridge for Thousands of Years - Scientific American
"Genetic evidence supports a theory that ancestors of Native Americans lived for 15,000 years on the Bering Land Bridge between Asia and North America until the last ice age ended" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The theory that the Americas were populated by humans crossing from Siberia to Alaska across a land bridge was first proposed as far back as 1590, and has been generally accepted since the 1930s." - Maitani
"But genetic evidence shows there is no direct ancestral link between the people of ancient East Asia and modern Native Americans. A comparison of DNA from 600 modern Native Americans with ancient DNA recovered from a late Stone Age human skeleton from Mal'ta near Lake Baikal in southern Siberia shows that Native Americans diverged genetically from their Asian ancestors around 25,000 years ago, just as the last ice age was reaching its peak." - Maitani
If I could live for thousands of years, I might be willing to live on a land bridge. As long as I had access to FriendFeed of course. - Amit Patel
Maitani
"Shared Shelf Commons is a free, open-access library of images. Search and browse collections with tools to zoom, print, export, and share images. Institutions that subscribe to Shared Shelf, a Web-based service for cataloging and managing digital collections, can share their images with the world via the Commons." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
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