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Maitani › Comments

Maitani
BBC News - Why is Sanskrit so controversial? - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Why is Sanskrit so controversial?
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"India's new government focus on Sanskrit has sparked a fresh debate over the role language plays in the lives of the country's religious and linguistic minorities." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Inside a brightly lit classroom at Delhi's Laxman Public school, a group of students sing a Sanskrit hymn. Across the corridor, in another classroom, a group of grade eight students are being taught Vedic Mathematics, which dates back to a time in ancient India when Sanskrit was the main language used by scholars. It is all part of Sanskrit week - a celebration of the classical... more... - Maitani
"Sanskrit is a language which belongs to the Indo-Aryan group and is the root of many, but not all Indian languages." - That is inaccurate. Classical Sanskrit and other Indo-Aryan languages are closely related, but they very likely descend from two different dialects of Old Indo-Aryan. The language of the most ancient documents of Indo-Aryan is the so called Vedic Sanskrit or just Vedic... more... - Maitani
The right-wing Hindu nationalists have started their project, I see. - Eivind from Android
Northern language group moves against Southern? They're just appropriating medieval French culture! - Pete : Team Marina
Hinduism is present in all Indian languages, in Sanskrit or Hindi as well as in the non-Indo-Aryan languages such as Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam. It is also right that a huge part of Sanskrit literature was not about religion; for two millennia, Sanskrit was the universal language of literature and learning. Alas, it is not a new phenomenon at all that the language is used as an instrument of right-wing Hindu indoctrination. With the new government, the project undoubtedly gains pace. - Maitani
Plus, there is the detrimental influence of several nationalisms, Northern vs. Southern, and more. - Maitani
Maitani
3quarksdaily: The colourful life of the man who translated Proust’s opus - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: The colourful life of the man who translated Proust’s opus
"The subtitle of this entertaining biography describes CK Scott Moncrieff as a “Soldier, Spy and Translator”. But Jean Findlay, his great-great-niece, makes clear in Chasing Lost Time that the list of his accomplishments and activities did not end there. Scott Moncrieff was also a generous family man, a promiscuous homosexual and a converted Catholic. His colourful, 40-year life somehow seems to embody almost every literary cliché of his time, from poet of the trenches to jazz age expat. And yet his name never appeared on the front cover of any of the 20-odd books he published." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
bi de bize bak amk - Kucuk ren
Maitani
Phlox
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w o w! - ma∟ıĸ
:-)) - Maitani
Maitani
IS THERE SOMETHING ABOUT ISLAM? | Pandaemonium - http://kenanmalik.wordpress.com/2014...
IS THERE SOMETHING ABOUT ISLAM? | Pandaemonium
"I took part on Saturday in a panel discussion at the World Humanist Congress in Oxford on ‘Is there something about Islam?’ which debated whether ‘there is anything distinctive about Islam’ that leads to violence, bigotry and the suppression of freedom. Other panellists were Alom Shaha, Maajid Nawaz and Maryam Namazie. This is a transcript of my introductory comments." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Every year I give a lecture to a group of theology students – would-be Anglican priests, as it happens – on ‘Why I am an atheist’. Part of the talk is about values. And every year I get the same response: that without God, one can simply pick and choose about which values one accepts and which one doesn’t." - Maitani
"My response is to say: ‘Yes, that’s true. But it is true also of believers.’ I point out to my students that in the Bible, Leviticus sanctifies slavery. It tells us that adulterers ‘shall be put to death’. According to Exodus, ‘thou shalt not suffer a witch to live’. And so on. Few modern day Christians would accept norms. Others they would. In other words, they pick and choose." - Maitani
A very good piece. - Eivind
And it is on such an important issue. I want to ask everyone of my acquaintances who are self-appointed critics of Islam and Quran to read it. Islamophobia is strong in Germany. - Maitani
Maitani
Phlox, Engelstrompete, Fetthenne und Stockrose
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Like! - ma∟ıĸ
Thank you, Malik.That roof garden is my little hobby. :-) - Maitani
Maitani
EM Forster: 'But for Masood, I might never have gone to India' | Books | The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/books...
EM Forster: 'But for Masood, I might never have gone to India' | Books | The Guardian
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"It took EM Forster 11 years to write A Passage to India – what made his progress so slow? Damon Galgut explores the repression and unreciprocated love that influenced the author's most celebrated work" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"At the time that he embarked on A Passage, Forster was at a curious point in his creative life. All of his other published novels were written in a flurry between 1905 and 1910. He had published some short stories too, but there are strong indications that his novelistic impulses were running dry. He had started a new one, which he called "Arctic Summer", in 1911, but it had already stalled before he set out on his first visit to India and it would never be completed." - Maitani
Maitani
A Passage To India - Location-Notes, Photos, and Maps of the Barabar Caves near Gaya, Bihar - http://www.mapability.com/travel...
A Passage To India - Location-Notes, Photos, and Maps of the Barabar Caves near Gaya, Bihar
A Passage To India - Location-Notes, Photos, and Maps of the Barabar Caves near Gaya, Bihar
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"The Barabar Caves are some 35Km north of Gaya, in the state of Bihar. They were visited by author E.M. Forster on one of his two visits to India. Struck by their curious echo, he used them as a central location in his book 'A Passage To India', renaming them 'The Marabar Caves' for the story. The Marabar Caves don't really exist. Well, that's almost true. You can find out more about them on my Marabar Caves page, but for now, lets talk Barabar." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Expecting to teach enhances learning, recall -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
"People learn better and recall more when given the impression that they will soon have to teach newly acquired material to someone else, suggests new research. Findings of the study suggest that simply telling learners that they would later teach another student changes their mindset enough so that they engage in more effective approaches to learning than did their peers who simply expected a test." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
""The immediate implication is that the mindset of the student before and during learning can have a significant impact on learning, and that positively altering a student's mindset can be effectively achieved through rather simple instructions," Nestojko said." - Maitani
Ogretmen ogretir. The teachers gonna teach. - clara glass from iPhone
bu iyi - hulusi
Maitani
What Would Krishna Do? Or Shiva? Or Vishnu? - NYTimes.com - http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014...&
"This is the ninth in a series of interviews about religion that I am conducting for The Stone. The interviewee for this installment is Jonardon Ganeri, currently a visiting professor of philosophy at New York University Abu Dhabi and the author of “The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Neolithic dairy farming at the extreme of agriculture in northern Europe - http://rspb.royalsocietypublis...
"Abstract: The conventional ‘Neolithic package’ comprised animals and plants originally domesticated in the Near East. As farming spread on a generally northwest trajectory across Europe, early pastoralists would have been faced with the challenge of making farming viable in regions in which the organisms were poorly adapted to providing optimal yields or even surviving. Hence, it has long been debated whether Neolithic economies were ever established at the modern limits of agriculture. Here, we examine food residues in pottery, testing a hypothesis that Neolithic farming was practiced beyond the 60th parallel north. Our findings, based on diagnostic biomarker lipids and δ13C values of preserved fatty acids, reveal a transition at ca 2500 BC from the exploitation of aquatic organisms to processing of ruminant products, specifically milk, confirming farming was practiced at high latitudes. Combining this with genetic, environmental and archaeological information, we demonstrate the... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Can a word really be untranslatable? | OxfordWords blog - http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014...
Can a word really be untranslatable? | OxfordWords blog
"There’s no such thing as an untranslatable word. There, I’ve said it. Despite all the memes, blogs, and books to the contrary, all language is inherently translatable. However, whether the broader meaning of a text – the jokes, philosophies, and cultural peculiarities of its language – is translatable depends almost entirely on the individual with their nose in the dictionary (not to mention the dictionary itself)." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"When we say that a word is untranslatable, we tend to mean that it lacks an exact or word-for-word equivalent in our own language. In our desire to make everyone and everything understood, we sometimes forget that languages are living, writhing beasts: they evolve and mutate at such a rate that their genetic make-up is by nature very different, and it is almost impossible to pin them... more... - Maitani
Translatable vs untranslatable http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014... - Maitani
Maitani
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium - http://kenanmalik.wordpress.com/2014...
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium
"This week marked the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. Today marks  the anniversary of an even more grotesque event – the dropping of the atom bomb on Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. Three days later the second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. These remain the only use of nuclear weapons in warfare." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Some 12 km² of Hiroshima were destroyed, as were around 69% of the city’s buildings. The images above, which were taken by the US military on the day, show Hiroshima before and after the bombing. Some 66,000 people are thought to have died in Hiroshima on the day; probably a similar number again died over the next four months as a result of their injuries or from radiation sickness. So fierce was the heat that people were vaporised but their shadows left upon the walls." - Maitani
Maitani
"We drink a lot of tea in San Francisco—I guess you should expect no less for a city originally named Yerba Buena, after a local wild herb in the mint family (Satureja douglasii, shown to the right) used as an herbal tea." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"One local tradition is yum cha, 'drink tea' in Cantonese, the Chinese name for a mid-morning spent lingering over pots of tea with friends or family. Yum cha is invariably accompanied by dim sum: steamed shrimp dumplings, Malaysian-style steamed spice cakes, braised tofu skins stuffed with vegetables, pork siumai dumplings topped with fish roe. But the tea is what defines the ritual:... more... - Maitani
Maitani
"Plato famously said that there is an ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry. But with respect to one aspect of poetry, namely metaphor, many contemporary philosophers have made peace with the poets. In their view, we need metaphor. Without it, many truths would be inexpressible and unknowable. For example, we cannot describe feelings and sensations adequately without it. Take Gerard Manley Hopkins’s exceptionally powerful metaphor of despair: selfwrung, selfstrung, sheathe- and shelterless, thoughts against thoughts in groans grind." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"How else could precisely this kind of mood be expressed? Describing how things appear to our senses is also thought to require metaphor, as when we speak of the silken sound of a harp, the warm colours of a Titian, and the bold or jolly flavour of a wine. Science advances by the use of metaphors – of the mind as a computer, of electricity as a current, or of the atom as a solar system.... more... - Maitani
Maitani
Eurozine - Do not trust economists! - Lukasz Pawlowski, Tomás Sedlácek, Marcin Serafin - http://www.eurozine.com/article...
Eurozine - Do not trust economists! - Lukasz Pawlowski, Tomás Sedlácek, Marcin Serafin
"Treat economists like any religious minority, says Tomas Sedlacek. Grant them the right to say whatever they believe and the right to gather. But always be sceptical of the stories they tell. Just take the invisible hand of the market: it's plain wishful thinking, like a prayer." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
One (count 'em) economist (I forget their name and gender) predicted the (possibility of something akin to, but not necessarily on the scale of the actual) global economic meltdown before the fact. He (or she, possibly it, but definitely not they) is the exception that literally (yes, literally) proves the rule. - Slippy
Fascinating! - Son of Groucho
Maitani
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog - http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
"Agricultural labours continue in these two calendar pages for the month of August.  On the first folio, among a scatter border of flowers and insects, we see a roundel of two peasants, inside a barn.  They are at work threshing the wheat that was harvested in July, while, through the window behind them, we can see a few birds circling.  On the facing folio, a barefoot peasant is shaking a shallow basket, literally separating the wheat from the chaff.  Above him is a seated woman with a palm for the zodiac sign Virgo." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
orie
А кто-нибудь читает такое свободно? :)
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достигается тренировкой нормально - не грози икосаэдрам
@dixi это понятно, мне интересно, у кого такое в багаже и как оно туда попало :) - orie
ну вот из сказок братьев Гримм в детстве, например. - , пнукт сбычи мечт
@marchdown это какой у ребёнка был родной язык? - orie
Do you ask about the script or the content or both? It is two entries of an etymological dictionary of a Germanic language (I think), written in Antiqua. Very nice. I'd like to know how old that book is. - Maitani
Aha, OTTE is Danish. - Maitani
Готический шрифт мне в багаж попал из теории групп. - Berth Addwyn
@maitani This is Danish etymology dictionary, this edition: https://archive.org/details... I was asking if there are people who can read it freely and where they have learned it. I personally have difficulties in finding the word in this dictionary because I can't distinguish "uppercase" letters (it is easier with "lowercase") - orie
@spinysun Это как? Расскажи! - orie
у меня есть друг (не из фрф), который читает, потому что занимается австрийской литературой давно, и не раз просто приходилось. да, вырабатывается привычка, и всё. - cyberpunk soul
^^^Буквы готическим шрифтом используются для обозначения всяких штук в абстрактной алгебре. - Berth Addwyn
@spinysun наверное, только строчные? или прописные тоже? - orie
У меня есть книжка на датском, изданная в 1827ом, когда еще использовался готическое начертание букв. С трудом, но читаемо (плюс еще, конечно, многое пишется иначе, словарь отличается и т.п.) - Berth Addwyn
^^В основном как раз прописные, но в целом и те, и те. - Berth Addwyn
Maitani
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds - http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature...
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds
"Huge meat-eating, land-living dinosaurs evolved into birds by constantly shrinking for over 50 million years, scientists have revealed." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Theropods shrunk 12 times from 163kg (25st 9lb) to 0.8kg (1.8lb), before becoming modern birds." - Maitani
Watching some turkeys cross the road I could really see the dinosaur in them as they moved. Amazing to think such a thing can happen. - Todd Hoff
Maitani
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Wine cup of Pericles found - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Wine cup of Pericles found
"Experts are "99 per cent" sure that the cup was used by the Athenian statesman, as one of the other names listed, Ariphron, is that of Pericles' elder brother." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
""The name Ariphron is extremely rare," Angelos Matthaiou, secretary of the Greek Epigraphic Society, told the newspaper." - Maitani
Maitani
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014 - http://www.thesmartset.com/article...
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014
"The Burning of the World: A Memoir of 1914 is a document of one man’s attempt to repaint his broken landscape. It is remarkable how quickly his world was lost. In hindsight, we think of the First World War as a four-year affair. We forget, though, that Austria-Hungary lost half of its men within the first two weeks of the war — 400,000 men, including 100,000 who were taken prisoner by the Russians. At the war’s start, the grand Austro-Hungarian soldier, with his long ridiculous sword, was often killed or maimed within days of reaching the battlefield. The injured and insane were sent home to wander their cities like ghosts, to parade before the horrified eyes of their neighbors. And the war kept going on." - Maitani
Maitani
The Barefoot Bum: Does epistemology matter? - http://barefootbum.blogspot.de/2014...
The Barefoot Bum: Does epistemology matter?
"A number of articles recently assert that the epistemology of religion doesn't matter; what matters are the practices. (The latest of course, being Religion, Heuristics, and Intergenerational Risk Management, with my response.) And it is asserted that epistemology doesn't matter in a deep way: even if we know that the underlying structure of a set of practices is false, even in the "worst" sense of falsity, that doesn't matter. I find this position deeply problematic." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Eivind
"[A]s vicars and representatives on earth of their national god regarded as standing well above all other gods, they felt it their duty to impose the cult of Ashur in what was for them the whole world."
"This in general could only be achieved by force, but it did not matter since the king's enemies were ipso facto the god's enemies and therefore wicked devils who deserved to be punished whatever they had done. Thus, brigandry and occasional massacres were justified by the politico-religious ideology of the Assyrians; each of their campaigns was a measure of self-defence, an act of gangsterism but also a crusade." - Eivind
Ancient Iraq by Georges Roux - Eivind
The world hasn't changed much. - Stephan #TeamMarina from iPhone
The Assyrians are possibly the inventors of the "crusade," but the idea has certainly caught on in later history. - Eivind
I think you'd really like this book (if you haven't already read it), Maitani, even if it is a bit dated in some areas. I loved it :) - Eivind
Thank you, Eivind! I hadn't heard of it, and have put it on my soon-to-purchase-list now. :-) - Maitani
Maitani
Amphitrite’s Brood: Sea-Monsters in the Classical World | res gerendae - http://resgerendae.wordpress.com/2014...
Amphitrite’s Brood: Sea-Monsters in the Classical World | res gerendae
"[δείδω μή] …τί μοι καὶ κῆτος ἐπισσεύῃ μέγα δαίμων ἐξ ἁλός, οἷά τε πολλὰ τρέφει κλυτὸς Ἀμφιτρίτη: [I’m afraid] that some god’s going to send a great sea-monster against me; glorious Amphitrite breeds them in numbers." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Culturally as well as geographically, the sea was central to the Classical world. These days we’re encouraged to think of the Mediterranean as something that united rather than divided the region, teeming with shipping and movement. All of this is true, but sea-faring was also deeply perilous,[1] especially in the autumn and winter. Shipwrecks and deaths at sea were common. It’s no surprise, then, that ancient Mediterranean waters were believed to be home to all manner of monstrous and deadly creatures." - Maitani
Maitani
Indo-European Linguistics  »  Brill Online - http://booksandjournals.brillo...
Indo-European Linguistics  »  Brill Online
"The peer-reviewed journal Indo-European Linguistics (IEL) is devoted to the study of the ancient and medieval Indo-European languages from the perspective of modern theoretical linguistics. It provides a venue for synchronic and diachronic linguistic studies of the Indo-European languages and the Indo-European family as a whole within any theoretically informed or analytical framework. It also welcomes typological investigations, especially those which make use of cross-linguistic data, including that from non-Indo-European languages, as well as research which draws upon the findings of language acquisition, cognitive science, variationist sociolinguistics, and language contact." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Maitani
Fwd: Deaths in the Iliad: a Classics Infographic http://nblo.gs/YKDuS (via Demetrios the Traveller http://friendfeed.com/brexian...)
Maitani
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of
"Exactly 800 years ago on Sunday, in a field next to what is now the airport of Lille, a battle was fought which determined the history of England." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Today few people in the UK have heard of Bouvines. It has none of the ring of an Agincourt or a Crecy. Probably that is because England lost it. But the battle of 27 July, 1214, was just as significant as England's later victories over the French. Maybe more so." - Maitani
Bouvines and Muret- two 'obscure' battles with huge impace. Imperial loss at Bouvines as crucial as English; northern French victory at Muret also key in shaping France and thus Europe - Pete : Team Marina
It's right. I had never heard of it. But it sounds like it's one of those rare times when a defeat was probably the best outcome. - Mark H
I dunno. John being defeated was probably good, but the French winning- not so much ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Hah, weren't Maldon and Hastings also defeats? - Victor Ganata
Maldon led to an EPIC poem though ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Hasting to the Norman Yoke and thus, by winding roads, Lord of the Rings ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Maitani
"This is a blog about the origins of speech, but what began? How can we tell it when we see it? Parents usually say their children have started talking when they have a couple of words. Linguists tend to look for some hint of grammar. Some experts look for a favorite generative procedure. So there is room for argument even before we come up with a single fact about the beginnings." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"...But there is a long list of "design features" that characterize human language. In the 1950s and 60s the linguist Charles Hockett worked out a list of properties that, taken as a whole, were supposedly unique to language, and the list has become one of the commonsense tests of language origins. If your theory ends up with something that includes Hockett's properties, you may be onto... more... - Maitani
Maitani
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/dccmt...
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts
"Cuneiform writing was invented some 5000 years ago in southern Iraq for the purpose of keeping accounts - and for the next few hundred years book-keeping remained its sole use. The last datable cuneiform tablet, also from southern Iraq, is an astronomical diary for the year 75 CE. For the three millennia spanning the rise and fall of cuneiform writing, and arguably for some time after, numeracy was an inseparable and essential part of literate culture throughout the Middle East." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"While the vast majority of cuneiform tablets contain numerical data, written by professional scribes, a smaller number are the outcome of teaching, learning, or communicating mathematical techniques or ideas as part of scribal education. This website presents transliterations and translations of around a thousand published cuneiform mathematical tablets; a similar number await decipherment and analysis in museums around the world." - Maitani
Maitani
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED - http://www.wired.com/2014...
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED
"The new Luc Besson movie Lucy, starring Scarlett Johansson, opens in theatres countrywide tomorrow. It’s based on the immortal myth that we use only 10 percent of our brains. Johansson’s character is injected with drugs that allow her to access 100 percent of her brain capacity. She subsequently gains the ability to learn Chinese in an instant, beat up bad guys, and throw cars with her mind (among other new talents). Morgan Freeman plays neuroscientist Professor Norman, who’s built his career around the 10 percent claim. “It is estimated most human beings use only 10 percent of the brain’s capacity,” he says, “Imagine if we could access 100 percent.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"As it happens, I’ve written a book all about brain myths (Great Myths of the Brain; due out this November). I thought I’d use what I learned to give you a 60-second explainer on the 10 percent myth." - Maitani
Maitani
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus. - http://hellespont.dainst.org/startpa...
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus.
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus.
"The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus. As a partner of the German Archaeological Institute, the CoDArchLab cooperates with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University to combine the digital collections of classical studies of both institutions. Thus one of the most comprehensive and free online collections of Greek and Roman antiquity will be available for public and scientific use." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The basis of the Hellespont Project is the combination of text and object data using the metadata format CIDOC CRM. The CRM mapping of the Arachne database is part of other projects of the CoDArchLab carried out at the moment. The use of CIDOC CRM to map ancient text content in order to build a bridge to other types of sources is a methodological innovation." - Maitani
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