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What Would Krishna Do? Or Shiva? Or Vishnu? - NYTimes.com - http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014...&
"This is the ninth in a series of interviews about religion that I am conducting for The Stone. The interviewee for this installment is Jonardon Ganeri, currently a visiting professor of philosophy at New York University Abu Dhabi and the author of “The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Neolithic dairy farming at the extreme of agriculture in northern Europe - http://rspb.royalsocietypublis...
"Abstract: The conventional ‘Neolithic package’ comprised animals and plants originally domesticated in the Near East. As farming spread on a generally northwest trajectory across Europe, early pastoralists would have been faced with the challenge of making farming viable in regions in which the organisms were poorly adapted to providing optimal yields or even surviving. Hence, it has long been debated whether Neolithic economies were ever established at the modern limits of agriculture. Here, we examine food residues in pottery, testing a hypothesis that Neolithic farming was practiced beyond the 60th parallel north. Our findings, based on diagnostic biomarker lipids and δ13C values of preserved fatty acids, reveal a transition at ca 2500 BC from the exploitation of aquatic organisms to processing of ruminant products, specifically milk, confirming farming was practiced at high latitudes. Combining this with genetic, environmental and archaeological information, we demonstrate the... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Can a word really be untranslatable? | OxfordWords blog - http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014...
Can a word really be untranslatable? | OxfordWords blog
"There’s no such thing as an untranslatable word. There, I’ve said it. Despite all the memes, blogs, and books to the contrary, all language is inherently translatable. However, whether the broader meaning of a text – the jokes, philosophies, and cultural peculiarities of its language – is translatable depends almost entirely on the individual with their nose in the dictionary (not to mention the dictionary itself)." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"When we say that a word is untranslatable, we tend to mean that it lacks an exact or word-for-word equivalent in our own language. In our desire to make everyone and everything understood, we sometimes forget that languages are living, writhing beasts: they evolve and mutate at such a rate that their genetic make-up is by nature very different, and it is almost impossible to pin them... more... - Maitani
Translatable vs untranslatable http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014... - Maitani
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium - http://kenanmalik.wordpress.com/2014...
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium
AS IF STILL BURNING | Pandaemonium
"This week marked the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. Today marks  the anniversary of an even more grotesque event – the dropping of the atom bomb on Hiroshima on 6 August 1945. Three days later the second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. These remain the only use of nuclear weapons in warfare." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Some 12 km² of Hiroshima were destroyed, as were around 69% of the city’s buildings. The images above, which were taken by the US military on the day, show Hiroshima before and after the bombing. Some 66,000 people are thought to have died in Hiroshima on the day; probably a similar number again died over the next four months as a result of their injuries or from radiation sickness. So fierce was the heat that people were vaporised but their shadows left upon the walls." - Maitani
The Language of Food: Tea if by Sea - http://languageoffood.blogspot.de/2014...
The Language of Food: Tea if by Sea
The Language of Food: Tea if by Sea
Show all
"We drink a lot of tea in San Francisco—I guess you should expect no less for a city originally named Yerba Buena, after a local wild herb in the mint family (Satureja douglasii, shown to the right) used as an herbal tea." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"One local tradition is yum cha, 'drink tea' in Cantonese, the Chinese name for a mid-morning spent lingering over pots of tea with friends or family. Yum cha is invariably accompanied by dim sum: steamed shrimp dumplings, Malaysian-style steamed spice cakes, braised tofu skins stuffed with vegetables, pork siumai dumplings topped with fish roe. But the tea is what defines the ritual:... more... - Maitani
Why metaphor matters | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Why metaphor matters | OUPblog
"Plato famously said that there is an ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry. But with respect to one aspect of poetry, namely metaphor, many contemporary philosophers have made peace with the poets. In their view, we need metaphor. Without it, many truths would be inexpressible and unknowable. For example, we cannot describe feelings and sensations adequately without it. Take Gerard Manley Hopkins’s exceptionally powerful metaphor of despair: selfwrung, selfstrung, sheathe- and shelterless, thoughts against thoughts in groans grind." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"How else could precisely this kind of mood be expressed? Describing how things appear to our senses is also thought to require metaphor, as when we speak of the silken sound of a harp, the warm colours of a Titian, and the bold or jolly flavour of a wine. Science advances by the use of metaphors – of the mind as a computer, of electricity as a current, or of the atom as a solar system.... more... - Maitani
Eurozine - Do not trust economists! - Lukasz Pawlowski, Tomás Sedlácek, Marcin Serafin - http://www.eurozine.com/article...
Eurozine - Do not trust economists! - Lukasz Pawlowski, Tomás Sedlácek, Marcin Serafin
"Treat economists like any religious minority, says Tomas Sedlacek. Grant them the right to say whatever they believe and the right to gather. But always be sceptical of the stories they tell. Just take the invisible hand of the market: it's plain wishful thinking, like a prayer." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
One (count 'em) economist (I forget their name and gender) predicted the (possibility of something akin to, but not necessarily on the scale of the actual) global economic meltdown before the fact. He (or she, possibly it, but definitely not they) is the exception that literally (yes, literally) proves the rule. - Slippanoia
Fascinating! - Son of Groucho
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog - http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for August 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
"Agricultural labours continue in these two calendar pages for the month of August.  On the first folio, among a scatter border of flowers and insects, we see a roundel of two peasants, inside a barn.  They are at work threshing the wheat that was harvested in July, while, through the window behind them, we can see a few birds circling.  On the facing folio, a barefoot peasant is shaking a shallow basket, literally separating the wheat from the chaff.  Above him is a seated woman with a palm for the zodiac sign Virgo." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds - http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature...
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds
BBC Nature - Dinosaurs 'shrank' regularly to become birds
"Huge meat-eating, land-living dinosaurs evolved into birds by constantly shrinking for over 50 million years, scientists have revealed." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Theropods shrunk 12 times from 163kg (25st 9lb) to 0.8kg (1.8lb), before becoming modern birds." - Maitani
Watching some turkeys cross the road I could really see the dinosaur in them as they moved. Amazing to think such a thing can happen. - Todd Hoff
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Wine cup of Pericles found - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: Wine cup of Pericles found
"Experts are "99 per cent" sure that the cup was used by the Athenian statesman, as one of the other names listed, Ariphron, is that of Pericles' elder brother." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
""The name Ariphron is extremely rare," Angelos Matthaiou, secretary of the Greek Epigraphic Society, told the newspaper." - Maitani
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014 - http://www.thesmartset.com/article...
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014
The Smart Set: As the World Burned - July 25, 2014
"The Burning of the World: A Memoir of 1914 is a document of one man’s attempt to repaint his broken landscape. It is remarkable how quickly his world was lost. In hindsight, we think of the First World War as a four-year affair. We forget, though, that Austria-Hungary lost half of its men within the first two weeks of the war — 400,000 men, including 100,000 who were taken prisoner by the Russians. At the war’s start, the grand Austro-Hungarian soldier, with his long ridiculous sword, was often killed or maimed within days of reaching the battlefield. The injured and insane were sent home to wander their cities like ghosts, to parade before the horrified eyes of their neighbors. And the war kept going on." - Maitani
The Barefoot Bum: Does epistemology matter? - http://barefootbum.blogspot.de/2014...
The Barefoot Bum: Does epistemology matter?
"A number of articles recently assert that the epistemology of religion doesn't matter; what matters are the practices. (The latest of course, being Religion, Heuristics, and Intergenerational Risk Management, with my response.) And it is asserted that epistemology doesn't matter in a deep way: even if we know that the underlying structure of a set of practices is false, even in the "worst" sense of falsity, that doesn't matter. I find this position deeply problematic." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Amphitrite’s Brood: Sea-Monsters in the Classical World | res gerendae - http://resgerendae.wordpress.com/2014...
Amphitrite’s Brood: Sea-Monsters in the Classical World | res gerendae
"[δείδω μή] …τί μοι καὶ κῆτος ἐπισσεύῃ μέγα δαίμων ἐξ ἁλός, οἷά τε πολλὰ τρέφει κλυτὸς Ἀμφιτρίτη: [I’m afraid] that some god’s going to send a great sea-monster against me; glorious Amphitrite breeds them in numbers." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Culturally as well as geographically, the sea was central to the Classical world. These days we’re encouraged to think of the Mediterranean as something that united rather than divided the region, teeming with shipping and movement. All of this is true, but sea-faring was also deeply perilous,[1] especially in the autumn and winter. Shipwrecks and deaths at sea were common. It’s no surprise, then, that ancient Mediterranean waters were believed to be home to all manner of monstrous and deadly creatures." - Maitani
Indo-European Linguistics  »  Brill Online - http://booksandjournals.brillo...
Indo-European Linguistics  »  Brill Online
"The peer-reviewed journal Indo-European Linguistics (IEL) is devoted to the study of the ancient and medieval Indo-European languages from the perspective of modern theoretical linguistics. It provides a venue for synchronic and diachronic linguistic studies of the Indo-European languages and the Indo-European family as a whole within any theoretically informed or analytical framework. It also welcomes typological investigations, especially those which make use of cross-linguistic data, including that from non-Indo-European languages, as well as research which draws upon the findings of language acquisition, cognitive science, variationist sociolinguistics, and language contact." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Fwd: Deaths in the Iliad: a Classics Infographic http://nblo.gs/YKDuS (via Demetrios the Traveller http://friendfeed.com/brexian...)
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of
BBC News - The most important battle you've probably never heard of
"Exactly 800 years ago on Sunday, in a field next to what is now the airport of Lille, a battle was fought which determined the history of England." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Today few people in the UK have heard of Bouvines. It has none of the ring of an Agincourt or a Crecy. Probably that is because England lost it. But the battle of 27 July, 1214, was just as significant as England's later victories over the French. Maybe more so." - Maitani
Bouvines and Muret- two 'obscure' battles with huge impace. Imperial loss at Bouvines as crucial as English; northern French victory at Muret also key in shaping France and thus Europe - Pete : Team Marina
It's right. I had never heard of it. But it sounds like it's one of those rare times when a defeat was probably the best outcome. - Mark H
I dunno. John being defeated was probably good, but the French winning- not so much ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Hah, weren't Maldon and Hastings also defeats? - Victor Ganata
Maldon led to an EPIC poem though ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Hasting to the Norman Yoke and thus, by winding roads, Lord of the Rings ;) - Pete : Team Marina
Babel's Dawn: How Can You Recognize Language? - http://www.babelsdawn.com/babels_...
Babel's Dawn: How Can You Recognize Language?
"This is a blog about the origins of speech, but what began? How can we tell it when we see it? Parents usually say their children have started talking when they have a couple of words. Linguists tend to look for some hint of grammar. Some experts look for a favorite generative procedure. So there is room for argument even before we come up with a single fact about the beginnings." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"...But there is a long list of "design features" that characterize human language. In the 1950s and 60s the linguist Charles Hockett worked out a list of properties that, taken as a whole, were supposedly unique to language, and the list has become one of the commonsense tests of language origins. If your theory ends up with something that includes Hockett's properties, you may be onto... more... - Maitani
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/dccmt...
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts
The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts - The Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts
"Cuneiform writing was invented some 5000 years ago in southern Iraq for the purpose of keeping accounts - and for the next few hundred years book-keeping remained its sole use. The last datable cuneiform tablet, also from southern Iraq, is an astronomical diary for the year 75 CE. For the three millennia spanning the rise and fall of cuneiform writing, and arguably for some time after, numeracy was an inseparable and essential part of literate culture throughout the Middle East." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"While the vast majority of cuneiform tablets contain numerical data, written by professional scribes, a smaller number are the outcome of teaching, learning, or communicating mathematical techniques or ideas as part of scribal education. This website presents transliterations and translations of around a thousand published cuneiform mathematical tablets; a similar number await decipherment and analysis in museums around the world." - Maitani
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED - http://www.wired.com/2014...
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED
All You Need To Know About the 10% Brain Myth, in 60 Seconds | Science Blogs | WIRED
"The new Luc Besson movie Lucy, starring Scarlett Johansson, opens in theatres countrywide tomorrow. It’s based on the immortal myth that we use only 10 percent of our brains. Johansson’s character is injected with drugs that allow her to access 100 percent of her brain capacity. She subsequently gains the ability to learn Chinese in an instant, beat up bad guys, and throw cars with her mind (among other new talents). Morgan Freeman plays neuroscientist Professor Norman, who’s built his career around the 10 percent claim. “It is estimated most human beings use only 10 percent of the brain’s capacity,” he says, “Imagine if we could access 100 percent.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"As it happens, I’ve written a book all about brain myths (Great Myths of the Brain; due out this November). I thought I’d use what I learned to give you a 60-second explainer on the 10 percent myth." - Maitani
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus. - http://hellespont.dainst.org/startpa...
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus.
The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus.
"The Hellespont Project: Integrating Arachne and Perseus. As a partner of the German Archaeological Institute, the CoDArchLab cooperates with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University to combine the digital collections of classical studies of both institutions. Thus one of the most comprehensive and free online collections of Greek and Roman antiquity will be available for public and scientific use." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The basis of the Hellespont Project is the combination of text and object data using the metadata format CIDOC CRM. The CRM mapping of the Arachne database is part of other projects of the CoDArchLab carried out at the moment. The use of CIDOC CRM to map ancient text content in order to build a bridge to other types of sources is a methodological innovation." - Maitani
The peculiar history of cows in the OED | OxfordWords blog - http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014...
The peculiar history of cows in the OED | OxfordWords blog
"The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has hundreds of words that relate to cows. For most English speakers, the idea that anyone would need so many words for one specific animal probably seems absurd. Especially cows. Perhaps it’s their mysterious ubiquity throughout children’s books and TV shows or just the dull empty look in their eyes, but it’s easy to assume, as a casual observer, that there really isn’t much going on there." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"On a linguistic front, however, you’d be quite mistaken. Here is just a small taste of the strange and fascinating world of cow terminology:" - Maitani
Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online - The Local - http://www.thelocal.de/2014072...
Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online - The Local
"Hundreds of thousands of rare records and images from World War I have been put online by the German government, ahead of Monday's 100th anniversary of the start of the conflict." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website." - Maitani
Zeitschrift für Indologie und - Inhalt - Zeitschriften der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft - MENAdoc-Sammlung - http://menadoc.bibliothek.uni-halle.de/dmg...
Zeitschrift für Indologie und - Inhalt - Zeitschriften der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft - MENAdoc-Sammlung
"Zeitschrift für Indologie und Iranistik / hrsg. im Auftr. der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft. Leipzig : [Brockhaus [in Komm.], 1922 - 1936" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
How children categorize living things -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
"Name everything you can think of that is alive." How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree towering over the backyard? The children's responses in a recent study revealed clear convergences among distinct communities but also illuminated differences among them." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry - Neuroskeptic | DiscoverMagazine.com - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/neurosk...
Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry - Neuroskeptic | DiscoverMagazine.com
"A fascinating little paper in Brain examines Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon. It’s a collaboration by British neurologist Edward H. Reynolds and Assyriologist James V. Kinnier Wilson. The sources they discuss are almost 4,000 years old, dating to the Old Babylonian Dynasty of 1894 – 1595 BC. Writing in cuneiform script impressed into clay tablets, the Babylonians left records that (unlike paper) were inherently durable, so many of them have survived. All understanding of cuneiform was lost, however, for thousands of years, only to be deciphered in the 19th century." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The texts reveal that The Babylonians were remarkable observers and documentalists of human illness and behavior. However, their knowledge of anatomy was limited and superficial. Some diseases were thought to have a physical basis, such as worms, snake bites and trauma. Much else was the result of evil forces that required driving out… many, perhaps most diseases required the attention of a priest or exorcist, known as an asipu, to drive out evil demons or spirits." - Maitani
Ovid’s Metamorphoses: the Webcomic | res gerendae - http://resgerendae.wordpress.com/2014...
Ovid’s Metamorphoses: the Webcomic | res gerendae
"Res Gerendae is proud to introduce a new and exciting project by our own resident pictor, Charles Northrop:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Charlie aims to update every Monday. Check it out:" http://metamorphoses.classified-comic.com - Maitani
On Wittgenstein and Rorty - Shunya's Notes - http://blog.shunya.net/shunyas...
On Wittgenstein and Rorty - Shunya's Notes
On Wittgenstein and Rorty - Shunya's Notes
"Here are two wonderful essays I found in the archives of Prospect Magazine. The first essay, from 1999, is by Ray Monk, British philosopher and biographer of Wittgenstein, who Monk calls "the greatest philosopher of [the 20th] century". In it, Monk explores why "At a time like this, when the humanities are institutionally obliged to pretend to be sciences, we need more than ever the lessons about understanding that Wittgenstein—and the arts—have to teach us." (Also check out Wittgenstein, a quirky-brilliant film by Derek Jarman.)" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The second essay, from 2003, is by British philosopher Simon Blackburn, and is an extraordinary exposition of the life and mind of Richard Rorty, a pragmatist philosopher who Blackburn calls "arguably the most influential philosopher of our time."" - Maitani
1177 B.C., the year civilization did not collapse - The Unz Review - http://www.unz.com/gnxp...
1177 B.C., the year civilization did not collapse - The Unz Review
"Recently I read Eric Cline’s 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed. It’s a short book. If you are looking to familiarize yourself with the history and culture of the Bronze Age Near East in a format which isn’t a scholarly monograph, this is a good book for that, best read in complement with Robert Drews’ End of the Bronze Age (also see The Coming of the Greeks). If you are looking to understand why the complex of Near Eastern societies, spanning Mycenaean Greece to Babylon and Egypt, went into severe regress in the 12th century, this is not the book. Cline is good at stringing you along, but at the end of the day he doesn’t come to a definitive conclusion." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"And yet civilization did not collapse. It maintained genuine continuity in places such as Egypt and Assyria across the Bronze to Iron Age, and eventually these societies played critical roles in the cultural efflorescence which gave rise to the Axial Age. Arguably 1177 was notable because civilization did not collapse. It seems likely that proto-civilizations did die earlier, lost to... more... - Maitani
Started it this morning :) - Eivind from Android
Wasn't it the sea people ? - Todd Hoff from iPhone
what's the Axial Age? - .mau.
"Axial Age or Axial Period (Ger. Achsenzeit, "axis time") is a term coined by German philosopher Karl Jaspers to describe the period from 800 to 200 BC, during which, according to Jaspers, similar revolutionary thinking appeared in Persia, India, China and the Occident. The period is also sometimes referred to as the Axis Age.[1] Jaspers, in his Vom Ursprung und Ziel der Geschichte (The... more... - Todd Hoff
never heard of it - my knowledge ended with Iron Age. Thanks! - .mau.
Todd :-P (In the last few accounts I've read the Sea Peoples have been viewed more as an effect than a cause. Or at least as a minor cause among many.) - Eivind from Android
I'm not sure if that second paragraph you quoted is supposed to be a summary of the book's conclusions or if those are just Khan's ideas, Maitani. The author thinks collapse is a perfectly fitting term, even though he, of course, acknowledges that there was some continuity: "When the world emerged from the collapse of the Bronze Age, it was indeed a new age, including new opportunities... more... - Eivind from Android
Thank you for citing the author's summary, Eivind. It seems that Khan partly presents his own view (which is interesting and thought-provoking as always) without explicitly sorting it from the author's ideas. - Maitani
I am really looking forward to reading the book. - Maitani
This is basically a summary of the archeological and textual material currently available to Bronze and Iron Age scholars of the extended Middle East. I think it's a good intro to the subject for people with scholarly ambitions (or just people with a fetish for evidence), but I know of more friendly books if one wants a general introduction. That said, I really liked it, but I'm a freak with some prior knowledge :) - Eivind from Android
Also, is it just me or does Khan's knowledge seem a bit dated? I don't really encounter the "Axial Age" much in the recent accounts. - Eivind from Android
Eivind, maybe a few scholars who do comparative religious studies or philosophy of religion still work with that notion, but the idea is certainly not backed by empirical evidence, it is simply wrong, imo. I found this quote in the Wikipedia entry on "Axial Age": "For example, Diarmaid MacCulloch, professor of the history of the church at the University of Oxford, calls the Jaspers... more... - Maitani
According to your description of the book's tenor and main content, it is what I am looking for. I am interested in the period 1) just because I am a freak, too, 2) because I need more scholarly historical background for historical linguistics. :-) - Maitani
Prêt à Analyser | Caxton - http://caxton1485.wordpress.com/2014...
Prêt à Analyser | Caxton
"The humblest text can be a fruitful hunting ground." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"This napkin is 100% recyclable (Pret’s sustainability department is militant, we’re making headway). If Pret staff get all serviette-ish and hand you huge bunches of napkins (which you don’t need or want) please give them the evil eye. Waste not want not’" - Maitani
The Grand Budapest Hotel (The Republic of Zubrowka, Hungary) - Hotel Reviews - TripAdvisor - http://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_R...
The Grand Budapest Hotel (The Republic of Zubrowka, Hungary) - Hotel Reviews - TripAdvisor
"When we arrived we had some problems with the tram that leads to the main building, but it was quickly fixed by the highly efficient lobby boy. Out of all the common areas the one you should give special attention to is the Turkish bath and the Greek spa. Food was excellent, and on our first day there were regional sweets from the Mendl's bakery in our bedroom out of courtesy -- that was really nice and they tasted delicious. Staff was particularly kind and helfpul. Next season we'll certainly go back!" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
via kottke.org http://kottke.org/14... - Maitani
aaaaaaaawwwwwwwwwwww - LauraD in Something
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