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Scenes from the Odyssey in Ancient Art - slideshow of images painted on vases, kylikes, wine jugs, or mixing bowls http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Scenes from the Odyssey in Ancient Art | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
"The Ancient Greeks were incredibly imaginative and innovative in their depictions of scenes from The Odyssey, painted onto vases, kylikes, wine jugs, or mixing bowls. Many of Homer’s epic scenes can be found on these objects such as the encounter between Odysseus and the Cyclops Polyphemus and the battle with the Suitors. It is clear that in the Greek culture, The Odyssey was an influential and eminent story with memorable scenes that have resonated throughout generations of both classical literature enthusiasts and art aficionados and collectors. We present a brief slideshow of images that appear in Barry B. Powell’s new free verse translation of The Odyssey." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Alphabetical List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2012...
AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies lists 1382 titles today. - Maitani from Bookmarklet
The Historical Thesaurus of English - http://historicalthesaurus.arts.gla.ac.uk/
The Historical Thesaurus of English
"The Historical Thesaurus of English is a unique resource charting the semantic development of the huge and varied vocabulary of English. It is the first historical thesaurus ever produced for any language, containing almost every word in English from Old English to the present day. Of major interest to historians, philologists, linguists, and the general reader, the Thesaurus is an unrivalled resource for the historical study of the language. It is based on a comprehensive analysis of English as found in the second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and A Thesaurus of Old English (for words restricted to the Old English period of c.700-1150 AD). All these words and their dates of recorded use are displayed within a detailed semantic framework, offering a fascinating picture of the development of the vocabulary of English from its origins in Anglo-Saxon times to the present." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Eliot, Kipling and Intertextuality | Caxton - http://caxton1485.wordpress.com/2014...
Eliot, Kipling and Intertextuality | Caxton
"Those familiar with T S Eliot’s poem ‘The Waste Land’ will know that many of its lines echo earlier writers. For example,..." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
13-Year-Old Charlotte Brontë & Her Brother Wrote Teeny Tiny Adventure Books, Measuring 1 x 2 Inches | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
13-Year-Old Charlotte Brontë & Her Brother Wrote Teeny Tiny Adventure Books, Measuring 1 x 2 Inches | Open Culture
13-Year-Old Charlotte Brontë & Her Brother Wrote Teeny Tiny Adventure Books, Measuring 1 x 2 Inches | Open Culture
"So you consider yourself a reader of the Brontës? Of course you’ve read Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. (Find these classics in our collection of Free eBooks and Free Audio Books.) You’ve probably even got on to the likes of The Green Dwarf and Agnes Grey. Surely you know details from the lives of Charlotte, Emily, and Anne. But have you read such lesser-known entries in the Brontë canon as Scenes on a Great Bridge, The Poetaster: A Drama in Two Volumes, or An Interesting Passage in the Lives of Some Eminent Personages of the Present Age? Do you know of Brontë brother Branwell, the ill-fated tutor, clerk, and artist, and have you seen his own literary output? Now you can, as Harvard University’s Houghton Library has put online nine very early works from Charlotte and Branwell Brontë — all of which measure less than one inch by two inches." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
vay cimcimelere bak sen yav - Alfonker Tapir
Poemas del río Wang: The Czech sea - http://riowang.blogspot.de/2014...
Poemas del río Wang: The Czech sea
Poemas del río Wang: The Czech sea
"Lahvová pošta, a message in a bottle. It seems almost absurd that such a term has been also coined for it in a language where you can never meet such a thing. Nature has refused a sea to Czechia. So it was up to literature to bestow one upon her: Shakespeare in The Winter’s tale, and Radek Malý in his recently published children’s poetry book Moře slané vody, Sea of salty water." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
UNESCO World Heritage - Silk - https://unesco-world-heritage.silk.co/
UNESCO World Heritage - Silk
"In June 2014  UNESCO's World Heritage Committee announced the new inscriptions for the World Heritage List. This year 26 new sites made it into the list, making the current number of World Heritage Sites 1007, with two sites delisted. To celebrate this year's event, we built this portal which anyone can use to quickly visualize facts and stats about UNESCO's World Heritage database. A few things you can do: Search through the current World Heritage Sites, look at their geographical distribution, size, and year of inscription in the list. Discover the locations that are in danger, and the most common threats that menace their conservation. Browse through all the sites that are part of each State's tentative lists but didn't make it to a World Heritage status yet. Read overviews for each UNESCO Member State." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
via Free Technology for Teachers http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014... - Maitani
I recommend exploring the portal, despite the boring picture I posted. It is an excellent site that contains maps, images, data sets, and data visualizations about all of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites, but is focused on the sites added to UNESCO's list in 2014. - Maitani
The Pont du Gard Aqueduct Bridge – Masterpiece of Ancient Building ~ Kuriositas - http://www.kuriositas.com/2010...
The Pont du Gard Aqueduct Bridge – Masterpiece of Ancient Building ~ Kuriositas
Roof garden
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The Long Goodbye - Lapham’s Quarterly - http://www.laphamsquarterly.org/essays...
The Long Goodbye - Lapham’s Quarterly
"For a long time French and English novels were content to borrow their titles from the names of their chief characters, and this is how readers first learned of Robinson, Moll, Pamela, Jacques, Tom, Humphry, Tristram, Émile, Evelina, Emma, Oliver, David, and many others. Starting in the late eighteenth century, titles took a descriptive or even predictive turn. There were dangerous liaisons, prides and prejudices, lost illusions, great expectations, crimes and punishments, and other moral or legal considerations. These titles didn’t tell us much, but they hinted at risk and comeuppance, seemed to profess a large wisdom readers might share with the author at the expense of the characters. The novels themselves were not half as moralizing as their titles suggested—most of them were not moralizing at all—but they did seek collusion, appealing to what we thought we knew. We knew, for example, that expectations are great but rarely met. That’s what expectations are; otherwise they would... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
BBC News - English explodes in India - and it's not just Hinglish - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - English explodes in India - and it's not just Hinglish
"Anyone who travels beyond Delhi and Mumbai to India's provincial cities will notice English words cropping up increasingly in Hindi conversation. While some of these terms fell out of use in the UK decades ago, others are familiar, but used in bold new ways." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Picture the scene. I'm chatting to a young man named Yuvraj Singh. He's a college student in the Indian city of Dehra Dun. We're talking in Hindi. But every so often there's an English word. It's Hindi, Hindi, Hindi, and then suddenly an English word or phrase is dropped in: "job", "love story" or "adjust"." - Maitani
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/world...
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian
Europe's migrant influx: 'we need help but we don’t know where from' | World | The Guardian
"Like almost 60,000 others this year, Brahana decided to brave the Mediterranean sea in order to reach Italy, and therefore Europe. She paid people-smugglers $1,600 (£950), she says, to board a boat packed with more than 300 people. “It’s really hard with a small baby,” she says stoically of a journey that has proved deadly for thousands over the past 20 years. Her boat was intercepted by an Italian navy ship last week and all its passengers taken to safety. The question for them now is what comes next. Brahana, like many of the refugees and migrants landing in Italy, has not yet requested asylum and is not in the care of an official structure. She is waiting for the bus to Rome, where her aunt lives. And then? “I don’t know,” she admits. “I want to work. I can’t live in my country because of the government. We need help but we don’t know where from.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog - http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
A Calendar Page for July 2014 - Medieval manuscripts blog
"The aristocratic pleasures of April and May have been left far behind in these pages for the month of July.  Set amongst a riot of red flowers (perhaps characteristic of this month) is a roundel in which two peasants are kneeling and harvesting the wheat crop.  Behind them is a peasant’s hut and what may be a cathedral in the background, while overhead, lightning strikes as a summer storm rolls in.   On the next folio, beneath the continuation of saints’ days for June, is a roundel containing a bushy-tailed lion, for the zodiac sign Leo, within a frame of similarly-threatening clouds.  Below him is a shepherd, standing in a rather downcast manner among his flock (he is not as unlucky as our April shepherd, however), which his dog relaxes in the foreground." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
What do you really want to know about the past? « Heavenfield - http://hefenfelth.wordpress.com/2014...
"When you think about the past, what do you really want to know? Do you want to know what people thought and felt, their philosophy or understand their spin? Or, do you really want to know what really happened? What was their world really like, not what they said it was like? Sure we are all a little curious about both, but when push comes to shove, what do you want to know the most? Where will you invest your time?  These are really two very different approaches. I’ll soon be reviewing two books here that both look at nature in the Middle Ages and take opposite approaches." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The best example I have found of these diametrically opposed approaches is on medieval epidemics. Some historians will argue that it doesn’t matter what the disease was, all that matters is its demographic effect. Scientists will argue that you can’t really know anything about the epidemic without trying to characterize it medically/biologically, if not identify it. For many... more... - Maitani
I want to know all of it! I love the multidisciplinary approach to uncovering history :) What I DON'T want is for my ancient history books to focus too much on the history of uncovering the history. I've read a few books with a huge focus on small technical details about different digs, intrigues and scandals in archaeological circles, and the life story of the idle rich patrons. That stuff isn't ancient. It's 200 years old, at most. - Eivind
Agreed. To me it is also important that historians publish the sources of their knowledge, and lay out the uncertainties and limitations that result from limited access or from the nature of the sources. - Maitani
::: wood s lot ::: Max Pechstein - http://page2rss.com/p...
::: wood s lot ::: Max Pechstein
The Homer Multitext: Iliad 12 as Oral Traditional Poetry - http://homermultitext.blogspot.de/2014...
The Homer Multitext: Iliad 12 as Oral Traditional Poetry
"Each year at the Homer Multitext Summer Seminar we introduce a new group of students to the scholarly principles that underlie the Homer Multitext project, which are grounded in the research and fieldwork of Milman Parry and Albert Lord on oral poetry. In addition to talking in a broad way about how the Iliad was composed and transmitted over time, we also think out loud about how our understanding of Homeric poetry as an oral traditional system affects how we interpret the poetry. And each year we ground that discussion by focusing on a particular book of the Iliad. The students create an XML edition of the text and scholia for that book in the Venetus A manuscript, and in a series of sessions we talk as a group about the poetics of that book. This year's book is Iliad 12 and it has led us to discuss such topics as the building of and battle before the Achaean wall (which caused such consternation among Analyst scholars in the 19th and early 20th centuries), the poetics of battle... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
How to Teach Old Ears New Tricks - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
How to Teach Old Ears New Tricks - Scientific American
"Why We Can't Learn Like Kids Most of us English speakers can't tell the difference between Seung, Seong and Sung now, but back when we were babies we could. A large body of work shows that babies possess a remarkable ability to distinguish all sounds in all languages. But between six and 12 months of age, they begin homing in on their native language's sounds. They become experts in their own language, and as a consequence they lose their facility with the unfamiliar sounds of foreign languages. As it turns out, it's challenging to regain that ability." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Some of the best data on this phenomenon come from studies of Japanese adults learning to hear the difference between r and l. Why the Japanese? For one, because the r-versus-l problem is notorious; Japanese speakers tend to do little better than chance when attempting to tell their rocks from their locks. Second, they know they have this difficulty, and many will happily volunteer to... more... - Maitani
RT @erlesen: The Neolithic Southwest Asian Founder Crops http://www.jstor.org/action... einkorn, emmer, barley, lentil, pea, chickpea flax http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...
3quarksdaily: Gavrilo Princip, Conspiracy Theories and the Fragility of Cause and Effect - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: Gavrilo Princip, Conspiracy Theories and the Fragility of Cause and Effect
"Ashutosh Jogalekar in Scientfic American (Achille Beltrame's illustration of the June 28, 1914 assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Gavrilo Princip (Image: Wikipedia)):" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"When you read the story of the shots that led to World War 1, what strikes you is how staggering the gulf between cause and effect was, how little it takes for history to change, how utterly subject to accidental and unlikely events the fickle fortunes of men are. Reading the story of Princip and the Archduke, one sometimes gets the feeling of being no more than wood chips being cast adrift on the roaring river of history." - Maitani
Mineral fodder - We may think we are the first organisms to remake the planet, but life has been transforming the earth for aeons http://aeon.co/magazin...
lifeminerals147362371.jpg
"One could easily be forgiven for thinking that life bears little connection to rocks. From high-school science curricula to Wikipedia, the institutional separation of geology and biology seems as ingrained today as when the 18th-century Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus first distinguished animals, vegetables, and minerals. After all, what could be more different than a fragrant rose and a cold chunk of granite?" - Maitani
"As university students today well know, power-point obsessed lecturers have internalized the idea, drawn from evolutionary biology, that the primary mode of perception for primates is vision. As university students today also well know, this modern pedagogical axiom can suck the life right out of a room. Back in ancient times, or in the 1980s when I first attended university, only the dullest of lecturers required anything so fancy as plastic slides on an overhead projector. Everything was oral, chalkboards were sufficient, and it was wonderful. Or at least I thought it was, the occasional droning aside. My how things have changed. Today it would be unthinkable to deliver a lecture without the aid or crutch of power-point. If the slides are especially busy, students need pay no mind to the babbling person, or reader, who advances them." - Maitani
"Those who study traditional cultures in general and hunter-gatherers in particular are no doubt aware of these issues, but awareness and understanding are two different things. I’ve been groping toward some understanding, inspired in this task initially by Jack Goody’s Domestication of the Savage Mind (1977). While Goody’s classic opened my eyes to these issues, my ears were not opened... more... - Maitani
Walter J. Ong, Orality and Literacy http://occupytampa.org/files... - Maitani
"...during the floods papyrus swamps provided a larder of fresh food (birds, fish and game). In the modern world papyrus swamps are key to the development and sustainability of many areas in Africa where the swamps today act as sewage filters." (comment by http://www.salon.com/profile... on the article posted here http://friendfeed.com/history... )
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I have had a papyrus for years, and I keep the pot in standing water. I was really astonished by the fact that water and soil never developed that rotten smell (like other plants when getting too much water), they don't smell at all. - Maitani
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2011...
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg
"Antiquity in the Online-Publikationsserver (OPUS) der Universität Würzburg" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
The Ancient Egyptian invention that made everything else possible - Salon.com - http://www.salon.com/2014...
The Ancient Egyptian invention that made everything else possible - Salon.com
"The history of Egypt boggles the mind. By any standard the scale of achievement was enormous, but through it all, it seems clear that the economy remained rooted in agriculture. It was the everyday business of the ancient Egyptians to produce food. This they did using a system that was the envy of all. Sandra Postel, Director of the Global Water Policy Project, said that overall, Egypt’s system of basin irrigation proved inherently more stable from an ecological, political, social, and institutional perspective than that of any other irrigation-based society in human history, including the Fertile Crescent of Mesopotamia where a fallow year had to be interposed to rest the land between harvests on land that was also subject to salinization, something that did not happen along the Nile. “Fundamentally … the system sustained an advanced civilization through numerous political upheavals and other destabilizing events over some 5,000 years. No other place on Earth has been in continuous cultivation for so long.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
I'm currently working my way through a rather long lecture series on Egypt's rather long history. I'm all the way up to the 19th dynasty now and 1177 B.C. is on the horizon :) - Eivind
So you've already learned about the Battle of Kadesh? - Maitani
I am quite interested in Egypt's relations with Mittani and with the Hittites. - Maitani
Aye. I've had quite a bit to do with the Hittites lately. Mittani's been around, too. To get back to papyrus: When the Hittites switch from clay tablets to papyrus, we stop hearing from them. Thanks, Egypt :-P - Eivind from Android
:D, Eivind! Btw., the article mainly deals with the part papyrus boats and ropes play in the evolving Egyptian civilization prior to 3,000 BCE: "By far the most ingenious item that emerged from that period was rope, without which building boats and houses would have been more difficult, not to mention the erection of monuments for which Egypt is remembered in later times." It is fascinating to read. - Maitani
I read it, and I agree :) - Eivind
4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus - http://www.livescience.com/46513-a...
4,000-Year-Old Burial with Chariots Discovered in South Caucasus
"An ancient burial containing chariots, gold artifacts and possible human sacrifices has been discovered by archaeologists in the country of Georgia, in the south Caucasus." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Archaeologists discoveredthe timber burial chamber within a 39-foot-high (12 meters) mound called a kurgan. When the archaeologists reached the chamber they found an assortment of treasures, including two chariots, each with four wooden wheels." - Maitani
“In the Ukraine”? “In Ukraine”? “On Ukraine”?—Clarifying the Issue - Languages Of The World | Languages Of The World - http://languagesoftheworld.info/russia-...
“In the Ukraine”? “In Ukraine”? “On Ukraine”?—Clarifying the Issue - Languages Of The World | Languages Of The World
"As was noted above, some Ukrainians think that the use of the definite article with the name of their country makes it sound as if Ukraine is not a sovereign state. This idea, however, is mistaken. A number of current and former names of sovereign states, including those of the two Cold War superpowers, contain “the”: the United States and the Soviet Union. Note also the Netherlands, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the People’s Republic of China. Some writers have suggested that the definite article is used with sovereign state names only if they are plural. This stipulation might be said to work for the United States, the Netherlands and the Philippines, but “the United States” has generally been conceived as a singular entity since the Civil War (before the 1860s, one would usually write “the United States are…,” whereas since that time the correct usage is “the United States is…” Other countries that... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Young Leonard Cohen Reads His Poetry in 1966 (Before His Days as a Musician Began) - | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Young Leonard Cohen Reads His Poetry in 1966 (Before His Days as a Musician Began) - | Open Culture
"Many a singer-songwriter who first rose to prominence in the 1960s has taken the label of “poet,” usually applied by adoring fans, no doubt to the objection of a fair few serious poetry enthusiasts. But who among them could deny Leonard Cohen’s status as a poet? Though best known as a musician, Cohen has also racked up indisputable writerly credentials, having published not just the novels Beautiful Losers and The Favorite Game but many books of poetry including Death of a Lady’s Man, Let Us Compare Mythologies, and Flowers for Hitler. Some of them include not just poems written as poems but song lyrics — or perhaps works that began as songs but became poems. Surely his albums contain songs that began as poems. Those interested in figuring out Cohen’s simultaneous development as a poet and songwriter would do well to listen to his early poetry readings, like that of “Prayer for Messiah” at the top of the post." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
You should listen to the 92nd Y poetry readings <3 - Maitani
Why Germany Wants to Look Like Its Soccer Team - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society - http://www.psmag.com/navigat...
Why Germany Wants to Look Like Its Soccer Team - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society
"In a country where immigrants haven’t always been welcome, politicians champion Die Mannschaft as an integrated model of diversity." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"On the evening of June 25, 2008, Germany played one of the most-hyped soccer games in its long, proud history: The semi-finals of the 2008 UEFA European Championship. It wasn’t the country’s most important match—by 2008 Germany had already won both the European Championship and the World Cup three times—but the match carried a new kind of cultural importance. Germany’s opponent was... more... - Maitani
Leo Tolstoy's Family Recipe for Macaroni and Cheese - | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Leo Tolstoy's Family Recipe for Macaroni and Cheese - | Open Culture
"In 1874, Stepan Andreevich Bers published The Cookbook and gave it as a gift to his sister, countess Sophia Andreevna Tolstaya, the wife of the great Russian novelist, Leo Tolstoy. The book contained a collection of Tolstoy family recipes, the dishes they served to their family and friends, those fortunate souls who belonged to the aristocratic ruling class of late czarist Russia. Almost 150 years later, this cookbook has been translated and republished by Sergei Beltyukov. Available in an inexpensive Kindle format ($3.99), Leo Tolstoy’s family recipe book features dozens of recipes, everything from Tartar Sauce and Spiced Mushrooms (what’s a Russian kitchen without mushrooms?), to Stuffed Dumplings and Green Beans à la Maître d’Hôtel, to Coffee Cake and Viennese Pie. The text comes with a translation, too, of Russian weights and measures used during the period. One recipe Mr. Beltyukov provided to us (which I didn’t see in the book) is for the Tolstoy’s good ole Mac ‘N’ Cheese dish. It goes something like this:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
It was the best of cheese, it was the worst of cheese. - Stephen Mack
I love the photo because it reminds me of the Russian hospitality I experienced years ago. :-) - Maitani
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