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A Concise History of Geological Maps: From Outcrop to the first Map | History of Geology, Scientific American Blog Network - http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/history...
A Concise History of Geological Maps: From Outcrop to the first Map | History of Geology, Scientific American Blog Network
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"March 23, 1769 marks the birthday of pioneering stratigrapher William Smith, who is also credited with creating the first useful geological map, however like many other great accomplishments also Smith’s idea of depicting the distribution of rocks on a topographic map didn’t materialize out of nowhere." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The German mining engineer Georgius Agricola (1494-1555) dedicated in his “De re metallica” (1556) - an early textbook on mining technologies – an entire chapter to the distribution of valuable rocks in earth’s crust. The written description is correlated with various figures, showing in a sort of combined landscape – section the distribution, thickness and direction inside the mountain of the mineralized veins." - Maitani
The Holozene Lattice - by Razib Khan http://www.unz.com/gnxp...
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"Joe Pickrell and David Reich have put up a preprint at BioRxiv, Towards a new history and geography of human genes informed by ancient DNA. Since it’s a preprint at BioRxiv you can 1) read it for free 2) comment on it. It is a magesterial review of “where we are,” though close readers of this weblog may not find much that is new in their survey of the empirical results which are coming out of human population genomics and ancient DNA analysis. In regards to this let me highlight two sentences. First, it is now clear that long-range migration, admixture and population replacement have been the rule rather than the exception in human history. Second, the serial founder effect model is no longer a reasonable null hypothesis for modeling the ancient spread of anatomically modern humans around the globe. For the second I’m thinking in particular of Sohini Ramanchandran’s 2005 paper, Support from the relationship of genetic and geographic distance in human populations for a serial founder effect originating in Africa, though the model is older than that obviously, as is made clear in the acknowledgments." - Maitani
The Normans and Empire - by David Bates http://blog.oup.com/2014...
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"The expansion of the peoples calling themselves the Normans throughout northern and southern Europe and the Middle East has long been one of the most popular and written about topics in medieval history. Hence, although devoted mainly to the history of the cross-Channel empire created by William the Conqueror’s conquest of the English kingdom in 1066 and the so-called loss of Normandy in 1204, I wanted to contribute to these discussions and to the ongoing debates about the impact of this expansion on the histories of the nations and cultures of Europe. That peoples from a region of northern France should become conquerors is one of the apparently inexplicable paradoxes of the subject. The other one is how the conquering Normans apparently faded away, absorbed into the societies they had conquered or within the kingdom of France." - Maitani
Do “Native Americans and Russians share the same language”? | GeoCurrents - http://www.geocurrents.info/cultura...
Do “Native Americans and Russians share the same language”? | GeoCurrents
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"GeoCurrents has extensively criticized the mainstream media for its gross misrepresentations of current linguistic research, with headlines such as “English Language ‘Originated in Turkey’”, which does little but deceive and confuse the public. The recent headline in The Daily Mail “Native Americans and Russians share the same language: Dialects reveal how ancestors migrated 13,000 years ago” is another example of such blatant inaccuracy that reveals ignorance of the subject being reported. Leaving aside the imprecise use of the term “dialect” (dialect of what? a language whose other dialects do not reveal the same thing?), the claim that “Native Americans and Russians share the same language” is nonsensical. This problem is not limited to the headline, as the very first sentence of the article states that “It’s been known for years that some Native Americans and Russians share ancestors”—a sentence that presupposes the unquestionable truth of what is in actuality a highly problematic proposition." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
This is related to "Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia: Relationship between Siberian, North American languages", see http://ff.im/1goIze - Maitani
Happy Nowruz!
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Nowruz is my favorite holiday, because I really feel like celebrating the arrival of spring, and I like how this has been celebrated for hundreds of years in Persian culture as well as by people of various cultural and religious backgrounds. - Maitani
Happy Nowruz, dear Maitani <3 - mina_sydney from iPhone
Mina!!! I wish you happiness, prosperity and good luck! <3 - Maitani
JRR Tolkien translation of Beowulf to be published after 90-year wait | Books | theguardian.com - http://www.theguardian.com/books...
JRR Tolkien translation of Beowulf to be published after 90-year wait | Books | theguardian.com
"Hwæt! Almost 90 years after JRR Tolkien translated the 11th-century poem Beowulf, The Lord of the Rings author's version of the epic story is to be published for the first time in an edition which his son Christopher Tolkien says sees his father "enter[ing] into the imagined past" of the heroes." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Telling of how the Geatish prince Beowulf comes to the aid of Danish king Hroðgar, slaying the monster Grendel and his mother before - spoiler alert - being mortally wounded by a dragon years later, Beowulf is is the longest epic poem in Old English, and is dated to the early 11th century. It survives in a single manuscript, housed at the British Library, and has inspired countless... more... - Maitani
Language Log » "Slide down my cellar door" - http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll...
"In a 2010 NYT “On Language” column, Grant Barrett traced the claim that “cellar door” is the most beautiful phrase in English back as far as 1905 1903. I posted on the phrase a few years ago ("The Romantic Side of Familiar Words"), suggesting that there was a reason why linguistic folklore fixed on that particular phrase, when you could make the same point with other pedestrian expressions like linoleum or oleomargarine:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"…The undeniable charm of the story — the source of the enchantment that C. S. Lewis reported when he saw cellar door rendered as Selladore — lies the sudden falling away of the repressions imposed by orthography … to reveal what Dickens called "the romantic side of familiar things." … In the world of fantasy, that role is suggested literally in the form of a rabbit hole, a wardrobe, a... more... - Maitani
International Dunhuang Project: IDP 20 Event: Public Lectures and Reception - http://idpuk.blogspot.de/2014...
International Dunhuang Project: IDP 20 Event: Public Lectures and Reception
"Over a century of archaeology on the eastern Silk Road has resulted in thousands of textile finds, preserved by the dry desert air. In their variety — of material, dyes, designs and weaves — they demonstrate the richness of cultural and technical exchanges among the peoples of the Silk Road." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Aegeus - Society for Aegean Prehistory: Shifting boundaries: The transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean under a new light - http://www.aegeussociety.org/en...
Aegeus - Society for Aegean Prehistory: Shifting boundaries: The transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean under a new light
"The aim of the present paper is to propose some synchronizations, mainly taking into consideration the typology of pottery. The period of our focus is the early Late Bronze Age and the data presented come from the Mainland, Crete and the Cyclades. Ceramic data from different places are combined, offering interesting correlations in terms of relative chronology. Emphasis is given to the dating systems proposed by some scholars, like those of Warren, Hankey and Dietz, since they have greatly influenced the literature and are still being used widely. We are particularly interested in the synchronization of the Mainland with Crete on a ceramic basis and especially the period of the late Middle and early Late Bronze Age." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
See The Guidonian Hand, the Medieval System for Reading Music, Get Brought Back to Life - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
See The Guidonian Hand, the Medieval System for Reading Music, Get Brought Back to Life - Open Culture
"In the 11th century, a monk known as Guido of Arezzo, began to use the “Guidonian hand” as way to teach medieval music singers his hexachord, or six-note scales. Arezzo, who had also devised the modern musical notation system, had noticed that singers struggled to remember the various Gregorian chants that the monastic orders performed in the monasteries. To help their memorization, Guido decided to take the first syllable in each line of the well known hymn Ut Queant Laxis, and created a hexachord, or six note scale, that singers familiar with the hymn already knew: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la. The hand, shown above, was a map of the musical notes in this hexachord system, with each note associated with a particular joint. In all, the Guidonian hand ranges almost three octaves. Although it had fallen out of use for the past few centuries, the Guidonian hand seems to be making a comeback. Here’s a video of the method in action, forwarded our way by Anton Hecht, an Open Culture reader:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
I can't access my feedly reading list any more.
Now I consider using another feed reader. - Maitani
I like the way The Old Reader looks. It's free up to 100 feeds, but they keep changing it, so I'm not that confident it will stay that way. Fast and usable atm., at least. - Eivind
Thank you, Eivind. I just realized that feedly will work perfectly as soon as I have replaced my old PC which is still running on XP. - Maitani
Yay! - Kirsten from Android
I'm grateful for the schnappschuss, because a damn stork is blocking my view atm. :) - Eivind
We now have two storks and an egg! - Eivind
Already, Eivind? - Uli
Storks are in charge of all reproduction. They make their own rules :) - Eivind
Lots of twitter posts are coming in from people whose names I haven't seen in years.
I thought I was in the Twilight Zone but it is the Twitter Nightmare - Janet from FFHound!
Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia: Relationship between Siberian, North American languages -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia: Relationship between Siberian, North American languages -- ScienceDaily
"Evolutionary analysis applied to the relationship between North American and Central Siberian languages may indicate that people moved out from the Bering Land Bridge, with some migrating back to central Asia and others into North America, according to a paper published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 12, 2014 by Mark Sicoli, from Georgetown University and Gary Holton from University of Alaska Fairbanks." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Language trees can't be reconstructed as far back as the time of these migrations, so linguists are not able to contribute to the archeological and genetic data. Resemblances between words and typological similarities can't prove that two languages are related to each other. - Maitani
Amazing drone footage of an erupting volcano - kottke - http://kottke.org/14...
"How this quad-copter shooting HD footage of a volcano erupting in Vanuatu manages to escape the flying chunks of lava is beyond me." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow - http://riowang.blogspot.de/2014...
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow
Poemas del río Wang: Dissolving: Hunters in the snow
Pieter Brueghel the Elder: The Hunters in the Snow, 1565 - Piergiorgio Branzi: Alekseevskoe (Moscow), 1962 - Maitani from Bookmarklet
HPM - Hethitologie-Portal Mainz - http://www.hethport.uni-wuerzburg.de/HPM...
HPM - Hethitologie-Portal Mainz
"Links Hattuscha - die Hauptstadt der Hethiter – Hittite Epigraphic Findings In The Ancient Near East – Monuments of the Hittites – »mehr" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Beggars, buggers, and bigots, part 3 | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Beggars, buggers, and bigots, part 3 | OUPblog
"Unlike so many words featured in this blog, bugger has a well-ascertained origin, but it belongs with the rest of this series because it sheds light on its companions beggar and bigot. The route of bugger should be familiar by now (it is the same as before): from French, to Middle Dutch, and finally, to English. A single, most ingenious, attempt to derive bugger from Greek pygé “buttocks,” with reference to katapygón “sodomite,” has been rejected for good reason: there is no way to explain how a noun popular in Classical Greek made its way into Middle English slang. At present, everybody agrees that the source of bugger is Old French bougre, which in the Middle Ages meant “heretic,” from Bulgarus “Bulgarian.” The Bulgarians were Orthodox Christians, specifically Albigensians, and various sins, including bestiality, were imputed to them. Those rumors spread and were busily cultivated in Southern Europe before, during, and after the Albigensian Crusades (1209-1229), a bloody campaign I... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Tolkien’s Influence on Fantasy | Book View Cafe Blog - http://bookviewcafe.com/blog...
Tolkien’s Influence on Fantasy | Book View Cafe Blog
"Here’s Tolkien himself, in a letter to Milton Waldman, probably written about 1951 but never sent: “Do not laugh! But once upon a time (my crest has long since fallen) I had a mind to make a body of more or less connected legend, ranging from the large and cosmogonic, to the level of romantic fairy-story . . .The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama.” * He finishes with “Absurd.”" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Catholic Magic | Genealogy of Religion - http://genealogyreligion.net/catholi...
"According to early evolutionary anthropologists, magical thinking is supposed to be the province of “primitive” or traditional societies. As some of these societies progressively made their way toward modernity and became “civilized,” magical thinking was supposed to have disappeared. If it did not entirely disappear, then it was supposed to have given way to right proper religion. This is the progressive myth, found in both religious and secular forms, that prevails among civilized folk. The faithful among those folk tell themselves that religion has nothing to do with magic. The positivists among those folk tell themselves that science has replaced, or is inexorably displacing, residuals of magical thinking." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
NeuroLogica Blog » Can Thinking Change Reality - http://theness.com/neurolo...
NeuroLogica Blog » Can Thinking Change Reality
"I love the documentary series, The Day the Universe Changed, by James Burke. It’s a follow up to his equally good, Connections (I know, they have their criticisms, but overall they are very good). The former title is a metaphor – when our collective model of reality changes, for us the universe does change. When we believed the earth was motionless at the center of the universe, that was our reality." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"But Burke was not arguing that the nature of the universe actually changed, just our conception of it. Thinking alone cannot directly change external reality. That is magical thinking." - Maitani
"Such thinking, however, lies at the center of much new age spiritual claims. The secret of The Secret is that you can change your world by wishing. Proponents of such ideas are desperate for scientific validation of their basic premise. Such evidence does not exist. In fact over a century of such research shows rather conclusively that there is no such effect in operation in our world to any significant degree." - Maitani
▶ Klaus Nomi's 1978 debut at New Wave Vaudeville, Irving Plaza (NYC) - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
▶ Klaus Nomi's 1978 debut at New Wave Vaudeville, Irving Plaza (NYC) - YouTube
Play
start at 2.50 - Maitani
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents - http://www.geocurrents.info/cultura...
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents
The Tale of Two Ukraines, the “Missing” Five Million Ukrainians, and Surzhyk | GeoCurrents
"The correlation between ethnicity, (native) language, religion, and voting patterns—and the consequent split into “two Ukraines”—was established over a decade ago; GeoCurrents has discussed those issues here and here. (In fact, economic factors, such as the region’s contribution to GNP, salary levels, and industrial production, can be added to the mix, as they too correlate with the eastern/western Ukraine divide.) However, the easy slippage between ethnic and linguistic terms is problematic in the case of Ukraine because the ethnic and linguistic categories are not coextensive, although they do overlap to a significant degree. Moreover, speaking of the Russian- and Ukrainian-speaking populations are forming as two different language communities is somewhat misleading, particularly for the American audience not used to the high degree of bilingualism found in Ukraine." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The place of the Armenian language in the Indo-European family - http://dienekes.blogspot.de/2014...
Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: The place of the Armenian language in the Indo-European family
"A very interesting talk at the Library of Congress making a good case for a Greek-Phrygian-Armenian clade within the Indo-European family." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Modern Armenians are quite distinct from modern populations of the Balkans but who knows how both they and the populations of the Balkans have changed since the beginning of the Iron Age when the Phrygians established themselves in Asia Minor? The recent study by Hellenthal et al. did not find any good evidence for recent admixture in Armenians but this might be due to (i) Armenians... more... - Maitani
How do British and American attitudes to dictionaries differ? | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
How do British and American attitudes to dictionaries differ? | OUPblog
"For 20 years, 14 of those in England, I’ve been giving lectures about the social power afforded to dictionaries, exhorting my students to discard the belief that dictionaries are infallible authorities. The students laugh at my stories about nuns who told me that ain’t couldn’t be a word because it wasn’t in the (school) dictionary and about people who talk about the Dictionary in the same way that they talk about the Bible. But after a while I realized that nearly all the examples in the lecture were, like me, American. At first, I could use the excuse that I’d not been in the UK long enough to encounter good examples of dictionary jingoism. But British examples did not present themselves over the next decade, while American ones kept streaming in. Rather than laughing with recognition, were my students simply laughing with amusement at my ridiculous teachers? Is the notion of dictionary-as-Bible less compelling in a culture where only about 17% of the population consider religion... more... - Maitani from Bookmarklet
A Big List of 875 Free Courses From Top Universities: 27,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures - Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
A Big List of 875 Free Courses From Top Universities: 27,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures - Open Culture
"In recent months, we’ve enhanced what’s now a list of 875 Free Online Courses from top universities. Here’s the lowdown: Our big list of free courses lets you download audio & video lectures from schools like Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford, Harvard and UC Berkeley. Generally, the courses can be accessed via YouTube, iTunes or university web sites. Right now you’ll find 100 free philosophy courses, 67 free history courses, 90 free computer science courses, and 47 free Physics courses on the list, and that’s just beginning to scratch the surface. Indeed you can also find sections covering Astronomy, Biology, Business, Chemistry, Economics, Engineering, Literature, Math, Political Science, Psychology and Religion. If you want to ballpark it, there are about 27,000 hours of free audio & video lectures here. And if you spend 8 hours per day enriching yourself, you can keep yourself busy for the next 10 years. At no cost." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Here are some highlights from the complete list of free online courses. (As you’ll see, there are a couple of vintage courses by Richard Feynman and Allen Ginsberg, added for good measure.)" - Maitani
875 Free Online Courses from Top Universities http://www.openculture.com/freeonl... - Maitani
"This website is devoted to archaeological and historical research in the area of the ancient near-eastern kingdom of "Biainili", better known by the Assyrian name "Urartu". This is the area of Eastern Turkey, North-Western Iran, Armenia and parts of Azerbaijan." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The intention is to inform about recent developments in the area. The contributions of this website are often written in German, sometimes in English. But it is planned to publish them more and more in English for better understanding and distribution." - Maitani
The weight of mountains - http://kottke.org/14...
"A beautifully shot short film about mountains, how they form, how they age, and how they die." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
How we stopped speaking Yiddish http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...
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"In 1980, the five most common non-English languages spoken in the United States were (in order): Spanish, Italian, German, French and Polish. Thirty years later, the top five are (in order): Spanish, Chinese, French, Tagalog and Vietnamese." - Maitani
"That change, documented by the U.S. Census and flagged for us by Drew DeSilver of the Pew Research Center, provides a telling window into the demographic changes in the country over the past few decades. Check out this chart that details how the 17 most common non-English languages in 1980 have fared over the past 30 years. (Click the chart for a bigger image.)" - Maitani
Your face says it all? Not so fast -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Your face says it all? Not so fast -- ScienceDaily
"New research calls into question the very foundations of emotion science. It's a con­cept that had become uni­ver­sally under­stood: humans expe­ri­ence six basic emotions -- happiness, sad­ness, anger, fear, dis­gust, and surprise -- and use the same set of facial move­ments to express them. What's more, we can rec­og­nize emo­tions on another's face, whether that person hails from Boston or Borneo. The only problem with this con­cept, according to new research, is that it isn't true at all. Researchers have found that even basic human emotions are in fact not universally perceived." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Here's how the fal­sity came to be under­stood as fact. In the 1970s, a young psy­chol­o­gist named Paul Ekman trav­eled to Papua New Guinea to test whether emo­tions were uni­ver­sally expe­ri­enced and expressed as he sus­pected. To test his hypoth­esis, he looked at whether people rec­og­nized the same emo­tions in facial expres­sions around the world. Was a scowling face always clas­si­fied as angry regard­less of the observer's cul­tural back­ground? A pouting face as sad?" - Maitani
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