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Rembrandt in the Depths by Andrew Butterfield | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books - http://www.nybooks.com/blogs...
Rembrandt in the Depths by Andrew Butterfield | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books
Rembrandt in the Depths by Andrew Butterfield | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books
"“Rembrandt: The Late Works,” an exhibition now on view at London’s National Gallery, will linger long in the mind of anyone who has the pleasure to see it. Bringing together approximately ninety paintings, prints, and drawings Rembrandt made at the end of his life, it reveals a great artist working with unprecedented technical command and emotional power, even as the world closes in around him." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"In the fifteen years before his death in 1669, Rembrandt suffered one terrible reversal after another. In 1654, his common-law wife Hendrickje Stoffels was condemned as a whore for her relationship with Rembrandt, and this led some important clients to ostracize him. Ever a spendthrift, he went bankrupt two years later and was forced to auction off his house, art collection, and... more... - Maitani
Acropolis Virtual Tour - http://acropolis-virtualtour.gr/en...
It looks so different without the legions of tourists :) - Eivind
It does. When I was there, I was so absorbed by the beauty of the place and its stunning history, that the presence of masses of people didn't bother me at all. :-) - Maitani
Then (in 2004) I planned to come back and spend a few days hanging out on the Acropolis and in Athens. I haven't visited Greece since, but I hope some day I will be back. - Maitani
They love Germans down there ;) - Eivind
I fear that could be a problem in situations when one might need help or something. I wish I could hang a plate around my neck, saying: I strongly disagree with Merkel's austerity policies! Although I am German, I am on "your" side! I am good! :( - Maitani
won't be a problem, don't worry, they might just tease you a little bit. the other day we called a cab and hopped in as a turk, an albanian, a german, and a bulgarian, i.e. arguably the most hated 4 nations in Greece, and the cab driver said that we should have walked into a bar and that'd be a joke. we said we had just walked out of one. - Alfonker Tapir
Geldrop, Netherlands
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Monthly etymology gleanings for October 2014, Part 2 | OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Monthly etymology gleanings for October 2014, Part 2 | OUPblog
"Brown study As I mentioned last time, one of our correspondents asked me whether anything is known about this idiom. My database has very little on brown study, but I may refer to an editorial comment from the indispensable Notes and Queries (1862, 3rd Series/I, p. 190). The writer brings brown study in connection with French humeur brune, literally “brown humor, or disposition,” said about a somber or melancholy temperament." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access to Brill's most downloaded articles from Q3 2014 - http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.de/2014...
AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access to Brill's most downloaded articles from Q3 2014
"Brill's most downloaded articles from Q3 2014 in the subject area of Classical Studies, Biblical and Religious Studies, and Middle East & Islamic Studies  Free access until 31 January 2015" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Free access until 31 January 2015 - Maitani
wow - Haukr from YouFeed
Lexicon Valley: The history and evolution of writing out numbers in the English language. - http://www.slate.com/article...
Lexicon Valley: The history and evolution of writing out numbers in the English language.
"Four and twenty. That's how many blackbirds, you may remember, were baked in that unappetizing pie of “Sing a Song of Sixpence” fame. But did people really write out—and speak—numerals in that way? Bob Garfield and Mike Vuolo talk about the transition in English—over the course of 700 years!—from four and twenty to twenty-four." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Hell-On-Line: About Hell, Texts, Images, Timeline, Glossary, Motif Index, Bibliography; Eileen Gardiner, editor - http://www.hell-on-line.org/
Hell-On-Line: About Hell, Texts, Images, Timeline, Glossary, Motif Index, Bibliography; Eileen Gardiner, editor
"HELL-ON-LINE is developing as a comprehensive on-line collection of over 100 visions, tours and descriptions of the infernal otherworld from the cultures of the world: principally from the Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Zoroastrian, Islamic and Jewish traditions from 2000 BCE to the present. These texts reveal the development of hell and its relationship to ideas of judgment, reincarnation, salvation, the apocalypse, and cyclic time. Visionaries and voyagers describe the geography of the underworld. Much like any other travelers, they lay out locations and distances, compass points, and physical characteristics, especially the surface features: oceans, mountains, rivers, roads, bridges and ditches. They also describe the inhabitants — both human souls and evil spirits — and the relationships between them, as they fulfill their particular doom, engendered by sins committed in this life, according to the laws and norms of the next life." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"THIS INTERACTIVE COMPILATION of texts and images describes the “place” that has preoccupied the imagination for four millennia. From hell’s origins, through its mature formulations across a variety of world cultures, to its questionable status in our own hands and minds, the selections include texts from across the world – including several works never before available in English – and images from historical cultures to the current press and cinema." - Maitani
A Calendar Page for November 2014 http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/digitis...
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"These two calendar pages for the month of November show a typical labour for this part of the agricultural season – the fattening of pigs for autumn. On the opening folio, beneath the beginning of the saints’ days for the month, is a roundel of a peasant in the woods. He is armed with a long stick, and is engaged in knocking acorns from oak trees to feed the pigs that are rooting around near his feet. On the following folio, we can see a small miniature of a centaur with a bow and arrow, for the zodiac sign Sagittarius. Beneath him is another peasant, heading home after a day of feeding pigs. He looks fairly miserable – understandably enough, as he is walking through a heavy rainstorm. Surrounding this roundel and the continuation of the saints’ days is a frame made up of golden columns, circled by banners with the initials ‘MY’ and ‘YM’. These initials might be clues to the original owner of the manuscript, whose identity/identities are still unknown. For more on this mystery, see here." - Maitani
Soak the Rich - The Baffler - An exchange on capital, debt, and the future - DAVID GRAEBER, THOMAS PIKETTY - http://www.thebaffler.com/odds-an...
Soak the Rich - The Baffler - An exchange on capital, debt, and the future - DAVID GRAEBER, THOMAS PIKETTY
"This exchange is from a conversation in Paris between David Graeber and Thomas Piketty, discoursing on the deep shit we’re all in and what we might do about climbing out. It was held at the École Normale Supérieure; moderated by Joseph Confavreux and Jade Lindgaard; edited by Edwy Plenel; first published by the French magazine Mediapart last October; and translated from the French for The Baffler by Donald Nicholson-Smith." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Very interesting. And I heartily recommend Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years :) - Eivind
Precisely: "Piketty: One of the points that I most appreciate in David Graeber’s book is the link he shows between slavery and public debt." Modern example: US student loans which can never be discharged in bankruptcy. Finance has mutated since Das Kapital. - Adriano
Have you read Gekaufte Zeit: Die vertagte Krise des demokratischen Kapitalismus by Wolfgang Streeck, Maitani? I just read a review, and I'm intrigued. - Eivind from Android
BBC News - Switzerland's shame: The children used as cheap farm labour - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Switzerland's shame: The children used as cheap farm labour
BBC News - Switzerland's shame: The children used as cheap farm labour
"Thousands of people in Switzerland who were forced into child labour are demanding compensation for their stolen childhoods. Since the 1850s hundreds of thousands of Swiss children were taken from their parents and sent to farms to work - a practice that continued well into the 20th Century." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Watch Kavita Puri's report Switzerland: Stolen Childhoods on Our World at 11:30 GMT on Saturday 1 November and at 2230 GMT on Sunday 2 November on BBC World News. Assignment is on BBC World Service radio from Thursday." - Maitani
Professor Pinker and Professor Strunk – Lingua Franca - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education - http://chronicle.com/blogs...
Professor Pinker and Professor Strunk – Lingua Franca - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"The voice on BBC radio was that of Professor Steven Pinker, fluent and engaging as ever. But my blood froze as I listened to what he said." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"...You see, Pinker’s own new book, The Sense of Style (Viking, 2014), which of course the ethos of the radio program would not permit him to pick, has solved a problem I’ve had for years. People keep asking me what, given my low opinion of The Elements of Style, I would recommend instead; and I have had little to say except that I wished there were an answer. Today there is an answer: For a sensible guide to what makes good writing good, buy Pinker’s book." - Maitani
by Geoffrey Pullum - Maitani
I was drilled on EoS in both English and Journalism classes. It's so bad, that I often force myself to break ingrained rules. I'll have to check out Pinker's book. - Anika
I think I'll read it, too. If only there was an equivalent guide for writing in German. - Maitani
Writing In The 21st Century | Edge.org - a Conversation with Steven Pinker http://ff.im/1iwmk0 - Maitani
National Portal and Digital Repository for Indian Museums - http://www.museumsofindia.gov.in/reposit...
National Portal and Digital Repository for Indian Museums
"The National Portal and Digital Repository for Indian Museums are developed and hosted by Human-Centred Design & Computing Group, C-DAC, Pune as per the agreement with Ministry of Culture, Government of India. HCDC Group has also developed JATAN: Virtual Museum software which is used for creating the digital collections in various museums and digital archival tools that are used in background for managing the national digital repository of museums." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Crabby and Evelyn, An Assessment of Evelyn Waugh's Life and Work | New Republic - http://www.newrepublic.com/article...
"To mark its 100th anniversary, The New Republic is republishing a collection of its most memorable articles. This week's theme: Literary birthdays. This piece originally appeared at The New Republic on May 8, 1995." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"My life is roughly speaking over. I sleep badly except occasionally in the morning. I get up late. I try to read my letters. I try to read the paper. I have some gin. I try to read the paper again. I have some more gin. I try to think about my autobiography. Then I have some more gin and it's lunch time. That's my life. It's ghastly." - Maitani
The first longer paper in my life I chose to write on Brideshead Revisited, many years ago. - Maitani
:: Welcome to National Mission on Monuments and Antiquities :: - http://nmma.nic.in/nmma...
"India is perhaps one of the largest repositories of tangible heritage in the world. A major part of this heritage is preserved in her monuments, sites and antiquities of varied nature. The range of such relics, from the past is indeed very vast and covers a long span of time i.e. prehistoric to colonial times. The monuments, sites and antiquities protected and maintained so far by Archaeological Survey of India and State Archaeology Departments are only a fraction of the total repository of the country. However, most of these have not been documented in a uniform format which can provide a common platform to the scholars, researchers and planners for reference, research and its management in a diligent manner." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Today, the survival of our heritage has been endangered due to climatic, natural and manmade effects. In the recent years there is also an increasing trend of illicit trafficking of antiquities from India. This is mainly due to lack of public awareness, ignorance of law/act and also about the importance of documentation and preservation. There are few cities in the country where number... more... - Maitani
Pidgin, patois, slang, dialect, creole — English has more forms than you might expect | Public Radio International - http://www.pri.org/stories...
Pidgin, patois, slang, dialect, creole — English has more forms than you might expect | Public Radio International
"There are probably as many terms for different kinds of English vernacular as there are vernaculars themselves: pidgin, patois, slang, creole dialect and so on." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"But while we usually think of the vernaculars as oral versions of the English language, they're making their way into the written word as well." - Maitani
Sounds of the Tides: Some Thoughts on Literature in the Vernacular http://3quarksdaily.blogs.com/3quarks... - Maitani
Stephen Colbert Reads Ray Bradbury Classic Sci-Fi Story "The Veldt" | Open Culture - http://www.openculture.com/2014...
Stephen Colbert Reads Ray Bradbury Classic Sci-Fi Story "The Veldt" | Open Culture
"I rarely think back to memories from that busywork-intensive containment unit known as American elementary school, but when I do, I usually arrive at listening to a Ray Bradbury story — something about a faraway planet, something about monsoons, I can never remember which one — during read-aloud time. Even then, on some level, I understood that the author of Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles (not that I yet had any idea at the time about books like Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles) wrote with the human voice in mind. Not necessarily the momentarily defamiliarized voice of a teacher reading to a post-lunch classroom of ten-year-olds, and not necessarily the flawlessly pronouncing and pausing, many-takes-recorded-per-sentence voice of the professional audiobook narrator (though Bradbury’s work did provide material for a few proto-audiobooks), but, perhaps, the voice of the mind. Of all Bradbury’s tales we love to read aloud, few seem quite so effective in this way as “The Veldt.“" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Place of the Year 2014: the longlist, then and now|OUPblog - http://blog.oup.com/2014...
Place of the Year 2014: the longlist, then and now|OUPblog
Place of the Year 2014: the longlist, then and now|OUPblog
"As voting continues on the longlist for Place of the Year 2014, we decided to take a look at the past and present of each of the nominees. Check out the images in the slideshow to see, and make sure to vote for your Place of the Year below." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
This one I like more.
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Am Dechsendorfer Weiher
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“Cleansing the Stock” | George Monbiot - http://www.monbiot.com/2014...
"To blot people out of existence first you must blot them from your mind. Then you can persuade yourself that what you are doing is moral and necessary. Today, this isn’t difficult. Those who act without compassion can draw upon a system of thought and language whose purpose is to shield them – and blind us – to the consequences." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The contention by Lord Freud, a minister in the UK’s Department of Work and Pensions, that disabled people are “not worth the full wage”(1) isn’t the worst thing he’s alleged to have said. I say “alleged” because what my ears tell me is contested by Hansard, the offical parliamentary record. During a debate in the House of Lords, he appeared to describe the changing number of disabled... more... - Maitani
a very good read - Halil
Schooning with Dragons 1 http://amitavghosh.com/blog...
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"The Bugis (or Buginese) are one of the great seafaring peoples of the Indian Ocean. Like those other great mariners, the Greeks, they are also great story-tellers: their epic, Sureq Galigo or La Galigo, is longer than the Mahabharata. The Buginese were converted to Islam in the 17th century and except for a few sub-groups of Christians and Hindus they are predominantly Muslim today. One interesting aspect of Bugis culture is that it recognizes five gender categories including a ‘meta-gender’." - Maitani
Highest altitude archaeological sites in the world explored in the Peruvian Andes: Survival in extreme environments -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Highest altitude archaeological sites in the world explored in the Peruvian Andes: Survival in extreme environments -- ScienceDaily
"Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments. The findings were taken from sites in the Pucuncho Basin, located in the Southern Peruvian Andes." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"The primary site, Cuncaicha is a rock shelter at 4,480 metres above sea level, with a stone-tool workshop below it. There is also a Pucuncho workshop site where stone tools were made at 4,355 metres above sea level. Climatic conditions in both sites are harsh, with factors including low-oxygen, extreme cold and high levels of solar radiation making life in the region a challenge for... more... - Maitani
Wide Urban World: Living the good life in Teotihuacan - http://wideurbanworld.blogspot.de/2014...
Wide Urban World: Living the good life in Teotihuacan
Show all
"I have written two articles that contain new information about life in ancient Teotihuacan. These are scheduled to be published in November, but in the meantime I want to talk about some of the new findings and their implications. Teotihuacan had a unique form of urban life and society. I don't mean this in the sense that one can claim that every city is unique. What I mean is that Teotihuacan had several features that are VERY unusual for premodern cities. Here I will mention several of these features:" - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Forthcoming: Grammatical theory: From transformational grammar to constraint-based approaches - http://langsci-press.org/catalog...
Forthcoming: Grammatical theory: From transformational grammar to constraint-based approaches
"This book introduces formal grammar theories that play a role in current linguistics or contributed tools that are relevant for current linguistic theorizing (Phrase Structure Grammar, Transformational Grammar/Government & Binding, Generalized Phrase Structure Grammar, Lexical Functional Grammar, Categorial Grammar, Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar, Construction Grammar, Tree Adjoining Grammar). The key assumptions are explained and it is shown how the respective theory treats arguments and adjuncts, the active/passive alternation, local reorderings, verb placement, and fronting of constituents over long distances. The analyses are explained with German as the object language." - Maitani
Are we free? | Prospect Magazine - http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/feature...
Are we free? | Prospect Magazine
"For several millennia, people have worried about whether or not they have free will. What exactly worries them? No single answer suffices. For centuries the driving issue was about God’s supposed omniscience. If God knew what we were going to do before we did it, in what sense were we free to do otherwise? Weren’t we just acting out our parts in a Divine Script? Were any of our so-called decisions real decisions? Even before belief in an omniscient God began to wane, science took over the threatening role. Democritus, the ancient Greek philosopher and proto-scientist, postulated that the world, including us, was made of tiny entities—atoms—and imagined that unless atoms sometimes, unpredictably and for no reason, interrupted their trajectories with a random swerve, we would be trapped in causal chains that reached back for eternity, robbing us of our power to initiate actions on our own." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
Behind the Mask: The Life of Vita Sackville-West by Matthew Dennison, book review: Story is as richly full of contradictions as Vita was herself - Reviews - Books - The Independent - http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-en...
Behind the Mask: The Life of Vita Sackville-West by Matthew Dennison, book review: Story is as richly full of contradictions as Vita was herself - Reviews - Books - The Independent
"In the famous image of Vita Sackville-West, Lady with a Red Hat, the writer is the embodiment of the confident young aristocrat. Exuding a languid elegance, her heavy-lidded Sackville eyes gaze out from beneath the broad brim. But this portrait captures another element of Vita’s persona. It was painted in 1918, shortly after her sexual awakening with Violet Keppel, and beneath the flamboyant clothes and bright lipstick there is an androgynous quality. In Behind the Mask, the first biography of Vita for 30 years, Matthew Dennison focuses on this ambiguity, exploring the duality which was rooted in her genetic inheritance and her eccentric upbringing." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Vita’s identity embraced masculine and feminine elements; her stiff-upper-lip English ancestry was in conflict with the Latin blood from her grandmother Pepita, a Spanish dancer who was the mistress of Lionel, Baron Sackville. Among their illegitimate offspring was Vita’s mother Victoria, who by marrying her cousin became the mistress of the Sackvilles’ ancestral home, Knole in Kent." - Maitani
Word magic from Shalom Auslander | Sentence first - http://stancarey.wordpress.com/2014...
"Browsing books at random in Galway, I picked up Shalom Auslander’s novel Hope: A Tragedy because the title caught my eye, and I bought it based on a cursory scan of its contents and reviews. The author’s name was also interesting to me, and the book turned out to be the most entertaining thing I had read in months." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"In the third grade, Rabbi Kahn told me my name was one of God’s seventy-two names, and he forbade me from ever writing it in full. We wrote primarily in Hebrew and Yiddish, so anything on which I wrote my name — God’s name — became instantly holy: tests, book reports, Highlights for Kids — consequently, they could never be mistreated. It was forbidden to let them touch the floor, it was forbidden to throw them away, it was forbidden to place other papers on top of them." - Maitani
The Greatest Ancient Picture Gallery by William Dalrymple | The New York Review of Books - http://www.nybooks.com/article...
The Greatest Ancient Picture Gallery by William Dalrymple | The New York Review of Books
"In the winter of 1844, Major Robert Gill, a young British military draftsman, set off from Madras into the independent princely state of Hyderabad to record a major new archaeological discovery." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"Some years earlier, in 1819, a British hunting party in the jungles of the Western Ghats had followed a tiger into a remote river valley and stumbled onto what was soon recognized as one of the great wonders of India: the painted caves of Ajanta. On the walls of a line of thirty-one caves dug into an amphitheater of solid rock lay the most beautiful and ancient paintings in Buddhist... more... - Maitani
Rare Ceramics And Indian Paintings At NY Asian Art Week http://www.blogandcollectibles.com/blog-an... - Blog and Collectibles
Philosophy Monkey: Steven Pinker - Linguistics as a Window to Understand the Brain - http://berto-meister.blogspot.de/2014...
Philosophy Monkey: Steven Pinker - Linguistics as a Window to Understand the Brain
"One of the things I first enjoyed when I was introduced to philosophy was its recursive nature: we could use thought to investigate the nature, the rules, the structure and the limits of thought itself (and what that could tell us about the human mind). For a very similar reason I have a certain appreciation and fondness for linguistics. Most of our communication takes place through language, and linguists are hard at work trying to understand what they can about human cognition, nature and culture, by paying close attention to the way in which we use language." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"In the following lecture, Steven Pinker provides a fascinating introduction to questions such as how syntax (the study of linguistic structure), phonology (the study of sound), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of the social and cultural role and context of language), all help us to understand how language works. He also provides a lesson on the nature of the... more... - Maitani
3quarksdaily: Coriander - http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarks...
3quarksdaily: Coriander
"At first (and at second, and third) glance, the use of spices in the cuisines of the subcontinent is a subtle and mysterious art, full of musty cupboards staffed by aging apothecaries (and grandmothers) and intertwined with theories of humor-balancing and our particular relationship to the gods. Recipes and spice blends are passed on in scribbled old notebooks and on furtive scraps of paper, copied and recopied like the epics, with long lists of spices and proportions, some crossed out and replaced with others for inexplicable reasons. The spices are essential, we are told, the order in which they are added is crucial, the mind of the cook must be perfectly clear, and the incantations must be uttered perfectly resonantly." - Maitani from Bookmarklet
"But how to make sense of this confusion if one did not grow up hovering over a mortar and pestle? Or even if one did and was momentarily distracted (perhaps by adolescence)? One route is a close reading of existing recipes and practices, noting patterns, highlighting parsimonious explanations and gradually drawing grander and grander conclusions. Equally useful is naïve... more... - Maitani
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