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Nature

Nature

All things NATURE - Wildlife, Conservation, Environment, etc
Halil
Very rare moth spotted in a Gloucestershire garden - the first time it has been seen in the county for eight years - http://www.wildlifeextra.com/go...
Very rare moth spotted in a Gloucestershire garden - the first time it has been seen in the county for eight years
The oleander hawk-moth was recently recorded in the Cotswolds by Jean Booth, who found it near to her tobacco flowers – a known food plant of the giant moth. - Halil from Bookmarklet
“When I realised it was an oleander, all I could think was ‘Wow’! It was so big and had the most beautiful markings. I’ve only been recording moths for just over a year and still can’t believe this rare migrant made its way to my garden.” - Halil
Halil
Flickr: Macroscopic Solutions': Geologists, Biologists and a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer. We provide novel imaging support and solutions to enhance scientific research and inspire kids. - https://secure.flickr.com/photos...
Started to follow me and figured I'd share their stream as it will appeal to many of you. Sorry can't embed photos, so click on link and check out them out! - Halil from Bookmarklet
Halil
Eagle-Eyed Birds of Prey Help Vultures Find Food - http://www.natureworldnews.com/article...
Eagle-Eyed Birds of Prey Help Vultures Find Food
But the vultures don't just follow the eagles to their next meal. They also use the sharp-beaked eagles as a way to better access food, letting them tear open tough carcasses - a talent that vultures lack - before swooping in and taking it all for themselves. - Halil from Bookmarklet
"Vultures were once the most abundant birds of prey in the world, but their numbers have been hammered in recent decades by habitat loss, inadvertent poisoning, and hunting," said Andrew Jackson, who supervised the research. "Our study shows, as is often the case in the tangled web of ecology, that it is important to consider other species when trying to conserve vultures. In this case, conserving early rising raptors may help to boost the chance that vultures find enough food to survive." - Halil
Sometimes we have a dozen vultures circling the ridge in front of our house, surfing the warm air as it rises up and away. Gorgeous to watch. - Todd Hoff
Halil
Photographer with Down's syndrome 'sees the world differently' - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news...
Photographer Oliver Hellowell has Down's syndrome, which his mother says means he sees the world differently to most other people. Oliver's unique way of capturing the natural world has recently gained him a lot of fans. Just over a year ago his mother Wendy O'Carroll set up a Facebook page for the eighteen-year-old's photography. That page now has over ten and a half thousand followers. "It's not just the numbers that have surprised the family, it's the range of people," says Wendy. The page has fans from Brazil to Alaska. Oliver hopes that photography - particularly of birds - can become his full-time profession. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Halil
Reserves and parks not enough to protect nature – David Attenborough - http://www.theguardian.com/environ...
Reserves and parks not enough to protect nature – David Attenborough
But rather than lament the changes, he urged everyone to act. “We know climate change is happening. It is regretted by some but it is also to be embraced. It is causing great changes in the distribution of animnals and birds in the countryside. We must take advantage of that. It is very important that we accept there are things coming in ... We must recognise that new animals and plants are coming in. Others are moving north. We ought to be giving thought to wildlife corridors ... and not think that every new arrival is to be repelled. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Halil
Extinctions during human era worse than thought | News from Brown - http://news.brown.edu/article...
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest estimate is that the pre-human rate was 10 times lower than scientists had thought, which means that the current level is 10 times worse. - Halil from Bookmarklet
The new study next examined evidence from the evolutionary family trees — phylogenies — of numerous plant and animal species. Phylogenies, constructed by studying DNA, trace how groups of species have changed over time, adding new genetic lineages and losing unsuccessful ones. They provide rich details of how species have diversified over time. - Halil
Halil
Hen Harrier returns to Peak District after help from a member of the Shooting community – Can we dare hope this is the beginning of a new era? - http://raptorpolitics.org.uk/2014...
Hen Harrier returns to Peak District after help from a member of the Shooting community – Can we dare hope this is the beginning of a new era?
Mark Avery’s e-petition is unlikely to reach the 100,000 signatures necessary to trigger a parliamentary debate, but the fact that someone has challenged the shooting industry’s attitude towards the persecution of the hen harrier is being taken seriously now in many quarters. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Defra’s response to E-Petition calling for driven grouse shooting to be banned in England http://raptorpolitics.org.uk/2014... - Halil
Koleksiyoner Ali
Halil
Most of the fish and birds that she's studied have come from Lake Erie. Mason and her students began collecting fish in January by going to local ice fisherman; Mason wound up with a lot of perch, since that's what they were catching. Through the spring, Mason and her student assistants examined 75 perch and 17 cormorants, a type of water bird. In both cases, a high percentage of the subjects had plastics in their gastrointestinal tracts, Mason says. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Halil
90 percent of Earth's species are overlooked in conservation - http://phys.org/news...
90 percent of Earth's species are overlooked in conservation
UK Professor Tom Curtis : I make no apologies for putting micro-organisms on a pedestal above all other living things, for if the last blue whale choked to death on the last panda, it would be disastrous but not the end of the world. But if we accidentally poisoned the last two species of ammonia-oxidisers, that would be another matter. It could be happening now and we wouldn't even know - Halil from Bookmarklet
Jenny and Hookuh Tinypants have said this to me many times in our chats, I've stop pestering them and others with my endless science questions now, lol, I bet they miss it, haha! ;-) - Halil
Ha! You're never pestering. :) You're passionate and that's cool. :D - Hookuh Tinypants
Koleksiyoner Ali
Jessie
Butterfly wings lift Greater Taichung students to victory - Taipei Times - http://www.taipeitimes.com/News...
Butterfly wings lift Greater Taichung students to victory - Taipei Times
"Two juniors from Taichung Municipal Hui-wen High School recently claimed the top prize at this year’s Shizuoka Kita Youth Science Engineering Forum after unlocking the secret to why Japanese white butterflies (Pieris rapae crucivora) dominate the white butterfly (Pieris canidia) population in Taiwan. Yuan Li-yun (袁笠芸) and Hsiao Pei-wan (蕭佩宛) said that the Japanese white butterflies account for up to 90 percent of the nation’s white butterfly population." - Jessie from Bookmarklet
"To determine why, the girls captured more than 100 white butterflies and put female Japanese and Taiwanese butterflies in separate ziplock bags to block the scent of insects’ pheromones. Even without being able to scent the females, the male Japanese butterflies were still drawn to the Japanese females, which prompted the pair to infer that the males rely mainly on vision, not scent,... more... - Jessie
"Their year-long project won the top prize in the forum’s Biodiversity category, outperforming 182 students from 26 schools and eight countries." - Jessie
Halil
Raising extinct species may bring balance to wildlife - http://www.natureasia.com/en...
I've said this before, lets save what we have instead of pumping untold millions in trying to resurrect what's been lost. If it's a recent extinction that has huge ecological benefit, then by all means bring it back, but we must save/preserve what we have or we're doomed to repeat the same mistakes, especially if governments think that all we need to do is mix a few test-tubes to bring back lost wildlife as a result of negligent conservation polices. We must never let governments become complacent and think science can save the day when all we need is to be more caring/protective about the environment. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Halil
As many as 28,000 birds may have been killed by flying through concentrated sun rays at a solar power plant located in the Mojave Desert - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
As many as 28,000 birds may have been killed by flying through concentrated sun rays at a solar power plant located in the Mojave Desert
According to AP reporters Ellen Knickmeyer and John Locher, the birds have been nicknamed “streamers” due to plume of smoke that comes from the birds as they ignite in midair after flying through rays at the BrightSource Energy plant. - Halil from Bookmarklet
There is always a trade off for renewable energy sources. We can't keep relying on non-renewable energy forever, so that means trying to minimize the consequences of renewables, but there will always be some. - Jenny H. from Android
:-( - renzo
Jenny, is there no way of minimizing the impact with some kind of deterrent, be it visual and/or auditory? - Halil
Sepi ⌘ سپی
Eggy.TV » Best Stories On The Net » Magic is truly in nature. Take a look at these magical beaches with glow in the dark water to renew your faith in it! - http://eggy.tv/magic-i...
Eggy.TV » Best Stories On The Net » Magic is truly in nature. Take a look at these magical beaches with glow in the dark water to renew your faith in it!
Eggy.TV » Best Stories On The Net » Magic is truly in nature. Take a look at these magical beaches with glow in the dark water to renew your faith in it!
Twinkles on the beaches of Maldives. - Sepi ⌘ سپی from Bookmarklet
Beautiful - Shirinooo
I have seen this effect before also on Cape San Blas a Florida gulf coast beach. Truly spectacular. - Eric Logan
Shirinooo joonam yes indeed || Eric, had no idea!! Florida has magnificent places, I should look into it ... it is truly spectacular. - Sepi ⌘ سپی
كاندوم ماهي؟ - بــ↑لا - پــ↓یین from BuddyFeed
بالا ... با رنگ نیان :-))) - Sepi ⌘ سپی
Halil
The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction | Science Blogs | WIRED - http://www.wired.com/2014...
The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction | Science Blogs | WIRED
I asked one of the bat scientists participating in the Southwestern Research Station bat census what would happen if White Nose Syndrome showed up in Arizona, a key migratory corridor for bats traveling to Central America. “Oh God,” he said. 
There was a long silence.
“It would be the end of the world.” - Halil from Bookmarklet
Koleksiyoner Ali
Koleksiyoner Ali
Koleksiyoner Ali
merhaba satılık baykuş arıyorum elinde olan bana bu numaradan ulaşırsa sevinirim 0535 593 7373 - Yasemin Van Buuren
nur topu gibi bir feyk hesap daha. Hayırlı olsun :) - Tarık
imabonehead
All 8 Pangolin Species Being Eaten into Extinction | Extinction Countdown, Scientific American Blog Network - http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/extinct...
All 8 Pangolin Species Being Eaten into Extinction | Extinction Countdown, Scientific American Blog Network
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"A few days ago customs officials in Vietnam raided a cargo ship from Sierra Leone and seized an astonishing 1.4 tons of dried pangolin scales. The grisly discovery came from the bodies of as many as 10,000 dead pangolins, the scaly anteaters of Africa and Asia that are being hunted into extinction for their meat and the supposed medicinal qualities of their scales. Experts estimate that more than one million wild pangolins have been caught, killed and traded in the past decade, making them the most heavily trafficked group of species in the world." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
:( - rönin
Sepi ⌘ سپی
Franz Josef Land - Gallery: Life Under the Arctic - http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014...
Franz Josef Land - Gallery: Life Under the Arctic
Franz Josef Land - Gallery: Life Under the Arctic
Franz Josef Land - Gallery: Life Under the Arctic
Searching for life in the frigid waters, expedition divers saw few fish but a lively selection of invertebrates, representing five different phyla. You won’t find any of these, brought up for closer examination, in your backyard pond. - Sepi ⌘ سپی from Bookmarklet
فانتزی دوران بچگیم این بود، یک روز این موجودات کنترل دریاها رو بدست بگیرند : دی فکر کنم زاده شده از یکی از داستان های ایزاک اسیموف بود - SaSha from Android
هاهاها ساشا خیلی‌ خوب گفتی‌ ... من یاد ژول ورن میندازه :-) - Sepi ⌘ سپی
Halil
World's Largest Aquatic Insect May Have Been Found, And It Will Haunt Your Dreams - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014...
World's Largest Aquatic Insect May Have Been Found, And It Will Haunt Your Dreams
This is probably a common insect in Australia. - Uli
Koleksiyoner Ali
Mustafa Kutlu: "Hayatı, yazıdan daha çok önemsiyorum. Bir ağacı anlatmak yerine, gölgesinde oturmak daha iyidir."
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Sepi ⌘ سپی
▶ HUMANITY IN ACTION! AMAZING SCENE AS 31 DOLPHINS LAND ON SHORE - YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/watch...
▶ HUMANITY IN ACTION! AMAZING SCENE AS 31 DOLPHINS LAND ON SHORE - YouTube
Play
This is so heartwarming ... Humans are the most complex creatures!! Yet, there is so much love in this world ... - Sepi ⌘ سپی from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Newly Discovered Wasp Plugs Nest With Cork of Ant Corpses – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science - http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014...
Newly Discovered Wasp Plugs Nest With Cork of Ant Corpses – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science
"For specific hints, you need to travel to the forests of China. There, Michael Staab from the University of Freiburg has discovered a new species of wasp that protects its young by stuffing the entrance to its nests with ant cadavers. The practice reminded him of European ossuaries—buildings like the amazing Sedlec Ossuary that are piled high and deep with human skeletons. In honour of these sites, Staab named the insect Deuteragenia ossarium. It’s the bone-house wasp." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
BBC News - Deep dives of devil rays solve 'mystery' of warm brain - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Deep dives of devil rays solve 'mystery' of warm brain
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"A new study shows that devil rays plunge nearly 2km below the ocean surface, making some of the deepest and fastest dives ever observed in the sea." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
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