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Paul Buchheit
Connecticut introduces a bill that not only acknowledges the right of citizens to record on-duty police officers, it also provides for a civil action against police officers who violate that right - http://www.theagitator.com/2011...
"Connecticut State Sen. Martin Looney (D-New Haven) has introduced a short bill (PDF) that not only acknowledges the right of citizens to record on-duty police officers, it also provides for a civil action against police officers who violate that right. That second part is important. A right doesn’t mean much if there are no consequences for government officials who ignore it. Witness this case in Florida, where an officer erroneously tries to say federal law prohibits citizen recordings of cops. Even in states where courts have thrown out criminal charges, a cop who doesn’t want to be recorded can still harass, threaten, and even arrest you. You may not be charged. But he won’t be punished, either. This is the first proposed state law I’ve seen on this issue that includes an appropriate enforcement mechanism. It would be great to see Congress take up a similar bill, under the First and Fourteenth Amendments." - Paul Buchheit from Bookmarklet
Citizen's Arrest! - Shevonne
Way to go, CT! - Jennifer Dittrich
*waits for GOP lawmakers to kill it in the cradle* - Big Joe Silence
Is there a provision for "Hey, I know you have a right to film me but you are a) in danger or b) putting others in danger." I understand and support this, but if a police officer is trying to perform a task and your filming of it is hindering that task, can the police ask you to move on - Johnny from iPhone
Johnny, yes. Read the PDF; it's really short. - Bruce Lewis
Awesome!!!!! - Jeff P. Henderson
Joe: Your ignorance truly shines through ... recording cops in public can land you hard prison time in Illinois, an overwhelmingly traditional Dem state. - LANjackal