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Nanoparticles Can Damage DNA Without Crossing Cellular Barrier. Scientists know that nanoparticles can damage DNA in cells through direct interaction. Now, though, it appears that nanoparticles can also mess with DNA on the far side of a cellular barrier, by creating signaling molecules -- a never-before-seen phenomenon. Realization that indirect... - http://www.popsci.com/science...
Nanoparticles Can Damage DNA Without Crossing Cellular Barrier. Scientists know that nanoparticles can damage DNA in cells through direct interaction. Now, though, it appears that nanoparticles can also mess with DNA on the far side of a cellular barrier, by creating signaling molecules -- a never-before-seen phenomenon. Realization that indirect exposure might matter as much as direct exposure suggests greater caution in deploying nanoparticles within the human body -- especially after the recent report of the first nanotech deaths from environmental exposure in China.
realization that indirect exposure might matter as much as direct exposure suggests greater caution in deploying nanoparticles within the human body -- especially after the recent report of the first nanotech deaths from environmental exposure in China. - pb: from Bookmarklet
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Mantis Shrimp Eyes Could Show Way To Better DVD, CD players. The most complex vision systems known to science. They can see in twelve colours (humans see in only three) and can distinguish between different forms of polarized light. It really is exceptional - out-performing anything we humans have so far been able to create. What's particularly... - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Mantis Shrimp Eyes Could Show Way To Better DVD, CD players. The most complex vision systems known to science. They can see in twelve colours (humans see in only three) and can distinguish between different forms of polarized light. It really is exceptional - out-performing anything we humans have so far been able to create. What's particularly exciting is how beautifully simple it is," "This natural mechanism, comprised of cell membranes rolled into tubes, completely outperforms synthetic designs.This wouldn't be the first time humans have looked to the natural world for new ideas, for example the lobster's compound eye recently inspired the design of an X-ray detector for an astronomical telescope.
What's particularly exciting is how beautifully simple it is," Dr Roberts continued. "This natural mechanism, comprised of cell membranes rolled into tubes, completely outperforms synthetic designs. .... This wouldn't be the first time humans have looked to the natural world for new ideas, for example the lobster's compound eye recently inspired the design of an X-ray detector for an astronomical telescope. - pb: from Bookmarklet
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