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Science News

Science News

News and discussion about interesting topics from the world of science.
imabonehead
"We all know that exercise can make us fitter and reduce our risk for illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. But just how, from start to finish, a run or a bike ride might translate into a healthier life has remained baffling. Now new research reports that the answer may lie, in part, in our DNA. Exercise, a new study finds, changes the shape and functioning of our genes, an important stop on the way to improved health and fitness." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
"Enter epigenetics, a process by which the operation of genes is changed, but not the DNA itself. Epigenetic changes occur on the outside of the gene, mainly through a process called methylation. In methylation, clusters of atoms, called methyl groups, attach to the outside of a gene like microscopic mollusks and make the gene more or less able to receive and respond to biochemical signals from the body." - imabonehead
If you're interested in this stuff, Nessa Carey wrote a pretty good book about it. https://www.goodreads.com/book... - Ken Morley
Spidra Webster
The theme of this issue is Scientific Ethics. - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Cool, they use open source OJS software to host the journal. - Joe
imabonehead
World's rarest cetacean could be extinct by 2018 due to illegal gillnetting | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building - http://inhabitat.com/worlds-...
World's rarest cetacean could be extinct by 2018 due to illegal gillnetting | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building
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"The vaquita is the rarest, smallest and most endangered cetacean in the world. It’s estimated that fewer than 100 of the small porpoises remain in their wild habitat in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California. To make matters worse, a surge in illegal gillnetting in the area — including in a marine refuge set up to protect the creatures — is resulting in about 18 percent of the vaquita population dying each year as a result of being caught as bycatch. At this rate, it is estimated the vaquita will be extinct in the wild by 2018." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Study offers support for the notion of e-cigarettes as a gateway drug - LA Times - http://www.latimes.com/science...
Study offers support for the notion of e-cigarettes as a gateway drug - LA Times
"Do e-cigarettes lure teens into a world of vice that turns them into smokers of regular cigarettes? This is the big fear of anti-smoking activists, and new data from Hawaii suggest they may be right. A survey of 1,941 ninth- and 10th-graders from Oahu found that 29% of them had tried electronic cigarettes at least once, and that 18% of them had used the devices in the last month, according to a study published Monday by the journal Pediatrics. Related story: Electronic cigarettes can be dangerous, even if you don't smoke them Related story: Electronic cigarettes can be dangerous, even if you don't smoke them These figures represent a substantial jump from e-cigarette smoking rates reported in earlier years. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Youth Tobacco Survey, for instance, found that 10% of U.S. teens had tried e-cigarettes in 2012, up from 4.7% in 2011. lRelated Youth e-cigarette use rising; heart group calls for regulation Science Now Youth e-cigarette... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Coffee got its buzz by a different route than tea : Nature News & Comment - http://www.nature.com/news...
Coffee got its buzz by a different route than tea : Nature News & Comment
"Caffeine's buzz is so nice it evolved twice. The coffee genome has now been published, and it reveals that the coffee plant makes caffeine using a different set of genes from those found in tea, cacao and other perk-you-up plants. Europe proposes joint Moon trips with Russia Microsoft billionaire takes on cell biology Watson's Nobel medal sells for US$4.1 million Coffee plants are grown across some 11 million hectares of land, with more than two billion cups of the beverage drunk every day. It is brewed from the fermented, roasted and ground berries of Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, known as robusta and arabica, respectively. An international team of scientists has now identified more than 25,000 protein-making genes in the robusta coffee genome. The species accounts for about one-third of the coffee produced, much of it for instant-coffee brands such as Nescafe. Arabica contains less caffeine, but its lower acidity and bitterness make it more flavourful to many coffee... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech - Scientific American
"Songbirds stutter, babble when young, become mute if parts of their brains are damaged, learn how to sing from their elders and can even be "bilingual"—in other words, songbirds' vocalizations share a lot of traits with human speech. However, that similarity goes beyond behavior, researchers have found. Even though humans and birds are separated by millions of years of evolution, the genes that give us our ability to learn speech have much in common with those that lend birds their warble." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour | The BMJ - http://www.bmj.com/content...
"Sex differences in risk seeking behaviour, emergency hospital admissions, and mortality are well documented. However, little is known about sex differences in idiotic risk taking behaviour. This paper reviews the data on winners of the Darwin Award over a 20 year period (1995-2014). Winners of the Darwin Award must eliminate themselves from the gene pool in such an idiotic manner that their action ensures one less idiot will survive. This paper reports a marked sex difference in Darwin Award winners: males are significantly more likely to receive the award than females (P<0.0001). We discuss some of the reasons for this difference." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
At ICRAF, the African Plant Breeding Academy graduates elite scientists - Agroforestry World Blog - http://blog.worldagroforestry.org/index...
At ICRAF, the African Plant Breeding Academy graduates elite scientists - Agroforestry World Blog
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"Among the machines humming in the seed lab stands Alice Muchugi, Genetic Resources Unit Manager at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Alice has been with ICRAF since she was a Masters student at Kenyatta University. She is now integral to the African Orphan Crops Consortium (AOCC) and the African Plant Breeder’s Academy (AfPBA), which graduates its first class of plant breeders on Thursday, 11 December 2014. The goal of the AOCC is to use the latest scientific equipment and techniques to genetically sequence, assemble and annotate the genomes of 101 African orphan crops for the development of robust and nutritious food. The 23 breeders graduating will be the first of many – the Academy aims to train 250 plant breeders and technicians over 5 years in techniques to create improved planting materials for African smallholder farmers. “The bulk of the crops we focus on are important to the rural livelihoods of people who practice subsistence farming,” says Alice. “If these crops have... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Study of massive preprint archive hints at the geography of plagiarism | Science/AAAS | News - http://news.sciencemag.org/scienti...
Study of massive preprint archive hints at the geography of plagiarism | Science/AAAS | News
"New analyses of the hundreds of thousands of technical manuscripts submitted to arXiv, the repository of digital preprint articles, are offering some intriguing insights into the consequences—and geography—of scientific plagiarism. It appears that copying text from other papers is more common in some nations than others, but the outcome is generally the same for authors who copy extensively: Their papers don’t get cited much. Since its founding in 1991, arXiv has become the world's largest venue for sharing findings in physics, math, and other mathematical fields. It publishes hundreds of papers daily and is fast approaching its millionth submission. Anyone can send in a paper, and submissions don’t get full peer review. However, the papers do go through a quality-control process. The final check is a computer program that compares the paper's text with the text of every other paper already published on arXiv. The goal is to flag papers that have a high likelihood of having... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Warwick University places 20 jobs at risk over failure to meet fundraising targets - News - Student - The Independent - http://www.independent.co.uk/student...
Warwick University places 20 jobs at risk over failure to meet fundraising targets - News - Student - The Independent
"Academics have accused their university of treating them “like City traders” after staff were put at risk of redundancy for not bringing in enough research income. A total of 20 staff at Warwick University’s medical school have been told their jobs are in jeopardy because they have failed to attract enough cash to the institution Professors, associate professors and readers at the school were told the benchmark to avoid being put at risk was bringing in an average of £90,000 a year over the last four years. The redundancy row comes at a time of heightened financial pressures within the university sector as it braces itself for the publication next Thursday of the latest Research Excellence Framework, which measures all institutions in the UK on the quality of their research. It also comes just two months after a senior professor at Imperial College London was found dead after telling colleagues that he felt under pressure from the university over grant applications. In the Warwick... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Tests May Soon Predict Alzheimer’s. Do You Want to Know? - Bloomberg - http://www.bloomberg.com/news...
Tests May Soon Predict Alzheimer’s. Do You Want to Know? - Bloomberg
"Before Alzheimer’s begins to steal the mind, hints of the disorder circulate in the blood, potentially giving people a way to find out if they’ll fall victim to the disease years in the future. The question is: Would you want to know? This year, research teams announced blood tests under development to diagnose Alzheimer’s before symptoms arise, including one that predicted the disease’s onset with 100 percent accuracy a decade in advance. While the tests will likely help drug companies evaluate medicines, they’ll also create wrenching personal and ethical dilemmas for patients who will have to live with the knowledge that they’re destined to develop the disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Alzheimer’s Association. For patients like Pamela Freeman’s mother, knowing Alzheimer’s was coming would have been a “tremendous help” to her family. Around age 75, her mother began to make unexplained, nonsensical purchases, stashing boxes all over the house. A... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
I'd want to know. My friend's grandmother had a slow decline, and it was so hard on the family in the first several years because it wasn't easy to see. I think that things would have gone a lot better for her and them if they'd known and could make sure that she was getting the right sort of health care checkups from the get-go. - Jennifer Dittrich
I'd want to know, too. Because we put off a lot of pleasures for some future date. If I were diagnosed with Alzheimer's, the future is now. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
What’s in a Name: Exposing Gender Bias in Student Ratings of Teaching - Online First - Springer - http://link.springer.com/article...
What’s in a Name: Exposing Gender Bias in Student Ratings of Teaching - Online First - Springer
"Student ratings of teaching play a significant role in career outcomes for higher education instructors. Although instructor gender has been shown to play an important role in influencing student ratings, the extent and nature of that role remains contested. While difficult to separate gender from teaching practices in person, it is possible to disguise an instructor’s gender identity online. In our experiment, assistant instructors in an online class each operated under two different gender identities. Students rated the male identity significantly higher than the female identity, regardless of the instructor’s actual gender, demonstrating gender bias. Given the vital role that student ratings play in academic career trajectories, this finding warrants considerable attention" - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Bed Bugs, Kissing Bugs Linked To Deadly Chagas Disease in U.S. - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
"Scientists thought Americans were safe in their sturdier houses. Now some are not so sure. Chagas-infected kissing bugs do enter at least some southern U.S. dwellings and bite people living there, recent studies suggest. And a new study published two weeks ago raises the specter of Chagas from another more familiar insect pest: bed bugs, found all over the country. Biting bed bugs have been found to transmit the parasite between mice." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Nooooo. :| - AHnix (Anna Haro)
imabonehead
Massive Study Reveals Schizophrenia's Genetic Roots - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Massive Study Reveals Schizophrenia's Genetic Roots - Scientific American
"The study, published in July in Nature, is the result of a collaboration among more than 300 scientists from 35 countries, named the Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. The researchers compared the whole genomes of nearly 37,000 people with schizophrenia with more than 113,000 people without the disorder, in a so-called genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genetic material, or DNA, is made up of a sequence of molecular pairs, thousands of which string together to form genes. The GWAS involves tallying known common mutations in these pairs, in people with and without a condition. Variants that show up significantly more often in people with the condition are said to be “associated” with it. The GWAS “potentially provides a more comprehensive view of the biological players in disease than previous genetic studies,” says Benjamin Neale of the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., one of the study's lead authors." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change - http://phys.org/news...
Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change
"A new study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found early warning signals of a reorganisation of the Atlantic oceans' circulation which could have a profound impact on the global climate system. The research, published today in the journal Nature Communications, used a simulation from a highly complex model to analyse the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), an important component of the Earth's climate system. It showed that early warning signals are present up to 250 years before it collapses, suggesting that scientists could monitor the real world overturning circulation for the same signals. The AMOC is like a conveyor belt in the ocean, driven by the salinity and temperature of the water. The system transports heat energy from the tropics and Southern Hemisphere to the North Atlantic, where it is transferred to the atmosphere. Experiments suggest that if the AMOC is 'switched off' by extra freshwater entering the North Atlantic, surface air... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
UC Berkeley professor critiques Saudi university's recruitment process of world's top researchers - http://www.dailycal.org/2014...
UC Berkeley professor critiques Saudi university's recruitment process of world's top researchers
"The U.S. News and World Report rankings have long been regarded as the Bible of university reputation metrics. But when the outlet released its first global rankings in October, many were surprised. UC Berkeley, which typically hovers in the twenties in the national pecking order, shot to third in the international arena. The university also placed highly in several subjects, including first place in math. Even more surprising, though, was that a little-known university in Saudi Arabia, King Abdulaziz University, or KAU, ranked seventh in the world in mathematics — despite the fact that it didn’t have a doctorate program in math until two years ago. “I thought this was really bizarre,” said UC Berkeley math professor Lior Pachter. “I had never heard of this university and never heard of it in the context of mathematics.” As he usually does when rankings are released, Pachter received a round of self-congratulatory emails from fellow faculty members. He, too, was pleased that his math... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
$7,000 a month not too shabby. Talk about gaming the system. - Joe
Yup. And it apparently achieved what they wanted. - Spidra Webster
imabonehead
The Chicken, Egg, and Dog: Are All Of Them Chinese After All? - http://www.forbes.com/sites...
The Chicken, Egg, and Dog: Are All Of Them Chinese After All?
"What came first, the chicken or the egg? Actually, this old philosophical question is now being replaced by another one with more historical relevance: where did they, the chicken and the egg, come from? Many regions of the world, notably the Middle East and Europe, have long claimed the honor of being the first home of the chicken and the egg. But now China is creeping from behind them with the ambition to be birthplace of both items. Professor Zhao Xingbo from the China Agriculture University, adamantly insists that a rooster from the Gallus genus lived in Northeast China (Dongbei) over 10,000 years ago." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
The Winnower | An open letter to AAAS journal "Science": Postdocs need to address the "The Future of Research" - https://thewinnower.com/papers...
The Winnower | An open letter to AAAS journal "Science": Postdocs need to address the "The Future of Research"
"In their letter, "Ailing academia needs culture change" (1), V. Callier and N. L. Vanderford highlight the inherent institutional instability that has been generated by flooding academic science with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. As postdoctoral fellows, we agree with both this letter and the recent call-to-arms by several prominent U.S. researchers (2) that a hyper-competitive atmosphere has developed, resulting in both the mental anguish described in C. Arnold's Working Life column, "The stressed-out postdoc" (3) and the development of an unsustainable workforce that endangers the future of biomedical research in the U.S. (2, 4). We are of the opinion that there are many practices that need to change if the future of science is to be ensured. There is a clear need for good mentorship and a reduction in the reliance upon cheap labor in the form of highly-qualified trainees on short-term contracts with little-to-no employment benefits. Principal investigators often... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
GuЄrriЄR◦٭*℃éLЄs†Є
Enormous alien planet discovered in most distant orbit ever seen http://nbcnews.to/1lhGGe5 via @NBCNews
Spidra Webster
Over 16,000 pages of Darwin's research on evolution released online - ScienceAlert - http://www.sciencealert.com/over-16...
Over 16,000 pages of Darwin's research on evolution released online - ScienceAlert
"On the 155th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's iconic work, On the Origin of the Species, 16,000 high-resolution images of his research on evolution have been released online to the public. BEC CREW 26 NOV 2014 Facebook Icon1.1kTwitter Icon421Email Icon This week, 155 years ago, Charles Darwin published a book that would change science forever - On the Origin of the Species. Over the past seven years, the American Museum of Natural History's (AMNH) Darwin Manuscripts Project has been digitising all of Darwin’s original notes and musings on evolution so they can be freely distributed online. Today, the manuscripts project reached the halfway mark by releasing over 16,000 high-resolution images of Darwin’s research on evolution to the public. The AMNH says the documents released "cover the 25-year period in which Darwin became convinced of evolution; discovered natural selection; developed explanations of adaptation, speciation, and a branching tree of life; and wrote... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Bodleian Libraries | Bodleian Libraries apply space age imaging to conservation research - http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/news...
Bodleian Libraries | Bodleian Libraries apply space age imaging to conservation research
Bodleian Libraries | Bodleian Libraries apply space age imaging to conservation research
"A conservation research team at the Bodleian Libraries are about to embark on a scientific study using a state-of-the-art imaging tool to decipher the early 'painting by numbers' system used by the Austrian botanical illustrator Ferdinand Bauer (1760–1826). The Bodleian's research team will use advanced hyperspectral imaging technology, initially developed by astrophysicists to study the colour of stars, to analyse material in the Libraries' unique collections. In particular, the new instrument, funded by the University of Oxford Fell Fund, will allow the researchers to identify previously unidentified pigments in Bauer's paintings and uncover minute details of his illustration techniques that are currently invisible to the naked eye. Through funding from the Leverhulme Trust, a researcher based in the Bodleian will spend the next three years investigating Bauer's work. Bauer's botanical and zoological paintings are considered to be among the finest in the world. Works such as the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
BBC News - Food crop wild relatives endangered - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Food crop wild relatives endangered
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"Scientists have released the most complete database of the wild relatives of common food crops. These wild relatives are closely related to our crops, but grow naturally under a wide range of environmental conditions. This makes them essential for the development of more resistant and adaptable food sources. However, many of them grow in conflict zones in the Middle East, where their conservation is threatened. Scientists from the University of Birmingham have highlighted "hotspots" around the globe, which are areas where many different types of wild relatives are concentrated. Here, they could be conserved to secure future global food resources. Farmers crossbreed the wild relatives with existing crops to produce varieties of grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes and tubers that are more adaptable to local climates. Lead scientist Dr Nigel Maxted from the University of Birmingham told BBC News: "Our goal is not only crop wild relative conservation, but to promote use of the conserved... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Engineered Bacteria Ripen Fruit By Belching Ethylene | Chemical & Engineering News - http://cen.acs.org/article...
Engineered Bacteria Ripen Fruit By Belching Ethylene | Chemical & Engineering News
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"The ruby red rows of tomatoes at the local grocery store don’t come off the vine in such a pretty state. Food producers pick fruits while unripe and later douse them with ethylene, a gas that plants naturally produce to trigger ripening. The ethylene used by food producers comes from cracking fossil fuels. As a green alternative, Cristina Del Bianco of the University of Trento, in Italy, and her team engineered Escherichia coli to produce ethylene to accelerate fruit ripening (ACS Synth. Biol. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/sb5000077). To program E. coli to make the gas, the scientists turned to another microbe called Pseudomonas syringae. This plant pathogen has an enzyme that converts 2-oxoglutarate, a citric acid cycle intermediate, to ethylene in a single step. The researchers inserted the gene into E. coli so that they could turn it on in the presence of the sugar arabinose. When they added arabinose to liquid cultures of the bacteria, ethylene levels in the flasks reached 100 ppm. Next,... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Of course, it's easier to just put your tomatoes near apples, in my book. - Spidra Webster
Or set them in the window sill like my mom always did. :) - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
"AGRICULTURAL enhancements. Drought mitigation. Deep space research. All are to be cut to the bone or closed under the Federal Government’s $115 million “efficiency dividend” on the CSIRO. The CSIRO Staff Association has released a new analysis which shows 878 employees will be cut by the middle of next year, amounting to one fifth of staff over two years. The staff cuts are the result of funding cuts from the May Federal budget and efficiency measures imposed by the previous Labor government. Science communicator Julian Cribb told ABC Radio yesterday the cuts were “lobotomising” Australia. “We are damaging the machine that produces the knowledge that going to keep this country competitive and efficient in the future,” he said. ‘Lobotomising’ ... Science communicator Julian Cribb says wealth in Australia comes from ‘Lobotomising’ ... Science communicator Julian Cribb says wealth in Australia comes from clever application of technology and science. Source: News Limited “We really are... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Dang. :( - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
Do we sign our peer reviews? Mostly, no. | The Molecular Ecologist - http://www.molecularecologist.com/2014...
Do we sign our peer reviews? Mostly, no. | The Molecular Ecologist
"Last week, inspired by discussions with my co-bloggers and a post by Terry McGlynn, I asked our readers to tell me whether they do peer review anonymously, and why. A total of 87 folks responded to a brief online survey, and here’s what they said: most of us review anonymously, and a lot of us do it to protect ourselves in interactions with senior colleagues. First, the headline result: how many Molecular Ecologist readers review anonymously? Of the 87 survey participants, 82% (71) said that generally they do no sign their peer reviews. PR_yes-no But I also asked participants how many reviews they’d done in the last year, and how many of those were anonymous—and this revealed that those general statements aren’t ironclad. PR_signed-by-general The 16 participants who said they generally sign their reviews actually signed a median of 79% of the reviews they performed in the last year. The 71 who generally don’t sign their reviews were most likely to have stuck to anonymity the whole... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Why we sign our peer reviews | The Molecular Ecologist - http://www.molecularecologist.com/2014...
Why we sign our peer reviews | The Molecular Ecologist
"Last week I posted the results from a brief survey of our readers, asking whether they usually sign their peer reviews. In that small sample of evolutionary ecologists, the overwhelming majority said they review anonymously, though many participants seem to take things on a case-by-case basis. Participants who review anonymously were more likely to cite habit, and to say that they were concerned about the consequences that non-anonymous reviews might have for their relationships with colleagues. I also asked participants to send in some more in-depth thoughts on the question of anonymous review, and lots of folks did. These are the responses from those who said they usually sign their reviews—you can find responses from folks who usually review anonymously here. I’ve done only minimal editing for clarity. Thanks to everyone who shared thoughts! Bryan Carstens, Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University, in the Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology. As a rule,... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Bedbugs Could Be Potential New Source of Tropical Disease in U.S. - Health News and Views - Health.com - http://news.health.com/2014...
"Until recently, insect-transmitted Chagas disease was found mainly in Latin America and South America, but it has made its way to the United States over the past few years. The potentially fatal illness is typically transmitted via the bite of the “kissing bug,” which feeds on the faces of humans at night. And now a new study suggests that common bedbugs might be carriers as well." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
BBC News - Polio eradication programme reaches 'major milestone' - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Polio eradication programme reaches 'major milestone'
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"A "major milestone" in the battle to eliminate polio globally has been reached, the US Centres for Disease Control (CDC) has said. Its experts think a second of the three forms of poliovirus has been eliminated after mass vaccination campaigns. Wild poliovirus type 3 has not been detected for more than two years. Type 2 was eradicated in 1999. Experts said the world was "closer than ever" to defeating polio but the situation in Pakistan was worrying. Polio is highly infectious and causes paralysis in up to one in 200 people. Some children die when the muscles that help them breathe stop working. But there has been huge progress in eliminating the disease. Cases have fallen from 350,000 in 1988 to 416 in 2013. The last case of type 3 poliovirus was detected in Pakistan in November 2012, according to the CDC report. Endemic "We may have eradicated a second of three; that's a major milestone," said Dr Stephen Cochi, a senior adviser at the CDC's Centre for Global Health. However, a... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Mental health: A world of depression : Nature News & Comment - http://www.nature.com/news...
Mental health: A world of depression : Nature News & Comment
Mental health: A world of depression : Nature News & Comment
"Depression is a major human blight. Globally, it is responsible for more ‘years lost’ to disability than any other condition. This is largely because so many people suffer from it — some 350 million, according to the World Health Organization — and the fact that it lasts for many years. (When ranked by disability and death combined, depression comes ninth behind prolific killers such as heart disease, stroke and HIV.) Yet depression is widely undiagnosed and untreated because of stigma, lack of effective therapies and inadequate mental-health resources. Almost half of the world’s population lives in a country with only two psychiatrists per 100,000 people." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Hollanda napıyor yahu orada? - cyb
Spidra Webster
Microbiome Studies Contaminated By Sequencing Supplies - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast...
Microbiome Studies Contaminated By Sequencing Supplies - Scientific American
"In this age of cheap DNA technology, scientists are sequencing every sample they can get their hands on. They've ID'd the microbes in mosquito guts, coral mucus and frog skin; in polar ice; even floating in the Earth's atmosphere. But it turns out some of the bugs reported to belong to those unusual microbiomes could unfortunately be contaminants, from non-sterile lab reagents and DNA extraction kits. So says a study in the journal BMC Biology. [Susannah J Salter et al.: Reagent and laboratory contamination can critically impact sequence-based microbiome analyses] Researchers sequenced a pure sample of just one type of bacteria. But depending which kit they used, which reagents, which lab, their results contained DNA from up to 270 different bacterial strains. Many of those contaminating strains are commonly found on human skin… (a lab technician's, maybe?) Or in soil or water. Which could explain why one recent study turned up soil bacteria in samples of breast cancer tissue, the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
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