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Science News

Science News

News and discussion about interesting topics from the world of science.
Halil
Paul Nurse accuses politicians of 'cowardice' over scientific evidence - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news...
Paul Nurse accuses politicians of 'cowardice' over scientific evidence
Politicians are "cowardly" in their repeated ignorance of scientific evidence that may be unpopular with the public, Sir Paul Nurse has said. The Royal Society president and Nobel Prize-winning geneticist said politicians "must be honest" when disregarding scientists' findings. He also warned "anti-immigration rhetoric" from certain political parties was damaging UK science. He said top scientists from abroad were being put off working in Britain. - Halil from Bookmarklet
This is probably true of most politicians around the world! - Halil
Halil
UK scientists develop AUV imaging technology to assess seabed ecology - http://www.oilandgastechnology.net/health-...
UK scientists develop AUV imaging technology to assess seabed ecology
By using a camera on the Autosub6000 AUV to take a continuous stream of high resolution photographs of life on the sea floor, this new method revealed a tenfold increase in the precision of deepsea ecosystem diversity estimates relative to the use of scientific trawling. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Dr Kirsty Morris, the lead author of this research, published in Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, said: “This is an important step towards the automated imaging of the deep sea, which is essential for understanding the complexity of seafloor biodiversity and its future management” - Halil
This research showed that anemones were the most abundant animal on the sea floor, information that has been previously missed from trawling because they became damaged in the nets and rendered unrecognisable. - Halil
Spidra Webster
Proof that female ejaculation is just pee. - Seriously, Science? - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/serious...
Proof that female ejaculation is just pee. - Seriously, Science?
"Up until now, the scientific literature was pretty much as divided as the internet on whether the large amount of fluid emitted from women upon orgasm represents “real” female ejaculate, or whether it is simply urine (there is a remarkably large body of literature on this topic, both scientific and trashy, and everywhere in between). Previous experiments have focused on determining the liquid’s chemical makeup, finding it to be chemically identical to urine, but these studies ignored the physical source of the copious fluid. Here, the researchers take it one step further by performing ultrasounds before and after ejaculation, as well as testing the biochemical properties of the liquid. It turns out that not only is it chemically identical to urine, but the bladder empties during the period of ejaculation coinciding with orgasm. So there you have it: it’s probably just pee after all! Nature and Origin of “Squirting” in Female Sexuality. “INTRODUCTION: During sexual stimulation, some... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
I wonder just how much this research cost? And I highly doubt scientific curiosity was the motive! - Halil
Golden showers for everyone! Also, ew. - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
"Long before humans touched the shores of the Hawaiian Islands, Maui’s dry central plains were a riot of native loulu palms and a‘ali‘i shrubs. Where sugarcane and suburbs stand today, giant flightless birds foraged, unaware of their impending extinction. A major component of that ancient forest is now missing, known only from pollen records. Botanists couldn’t decipher what this presumably extinct plant was, but soil samples showed that it once dominated Hawai‘i’s lowland forests. In 1992, Ken Wood, a botanist with the National Tropical Botanical Garden, was surveying Kaho‘olawe. Ravaged in the past by feral goats, sheep, wildfires, and military bombing, the uninhabited island had been reduced to lifeless hardpan—not exactly fertile soil for solving a plant mystery. Nevertheless, that’s what happened. Wood rappelled down Kaho‘olawe’s southern cliffs and clambered across some rocks to explore ‘Ale‘ale, a tiny sea stack just offshore. He found an intact shrubland with native plants... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
"TIMETREE is a public resource for knowledge on the timescale and evolutionary history of life. Search the database below or go to the TIMETREE OF LIFE for other resources." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Taxpayers spend $140 billion funding science each year — but can't access many of the results - Vox - http://www.vox.com/2015...
"The British commentator George Monbiot once compared academic publishers to the media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, concluding that the former were more predatory. "The knowledge monopoly is as unwarranted and anachronistic as the corn laws," he wrote. "Let's throw off these parasitic overlords and liberate the research that belongs to us." Despite a decades-old "open access" movement — to have all research findings in the public domain and not languishing behind paywalls — the traditional approach to publishing remains firmly in place. Taxpayers fund a lot of the science that gets done, academics (many of whom are also funded by public money) peer review it for free, and then journals charge users (again, many of whom paid for the science in the first place!) ludicrous sums of money to view the finished product. American universities and government groups spend $10-billion each year to access the science. That's ten billion dollars to buy back content we have often already paid for in the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
This sort of thing makes me furious. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
41-01 Duke Officials Silenced Med Student Who Reported Trouble in Anil Potti's Lab - The Cancer Letter Publications - http://www.cancerletter.com/article...
41-01 Duke Officials Silenced Med Student Who Reported Trouble in Anil Potti's Lab - The Cancer Letter Publications
"Duke University would have avoided embarrassment, a misconduct investigation and a lawsuit, had its top administrators paid closer attention to a thoughtful report by a medical student who saw problems in the lab of the disgraced scientist Anil Potti. Documents obtained by The Cancer Letter show that Duke’s deans were warned about Potti’s misconduct in late March and early April 2008, at the time when clinical trials of the now discredited Duke genomic technology were getting started. The three-page document was penned by Bradford Perez, then a third-year medical student and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute scholar. Instead of rewarding the student’s brilliance with a plaque and a potted plant, Potti’s collaborator and protector, Joseph Nevins—aided by a phalanx of Duke deans—pressured the young man to refrain from making a final complaint and reporting the matter to HHMI. The Perez memo and internal emails that are being published here for the first time directly contradict the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Monkeys Seem to Recognize Their Reflections - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Monkeys Seem to Recognize Their Reflections - Scientific American
"Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the smartest animal of them all? The ability to recognize oneself in a mirror has been touted as a hallmark of higher cognition — present in humans and only the most intelligent of animals — and the basis for empathy. A study published this week in Current Biology controversially reports that macaques can be trained to pay attention to themselves in a mirror, the first such observation in any monkey species. Yet the finding raises as many questions as it answers — not only about the cognitive capacity of monkeys, but also about mirror self-recognition as a measure of animal intelligence. “Simply because you’re acting as if you recognize yourself in a mirror doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve achieved self-recognition,” says Gordon Gallup, an evolutionary psychologist at the State University of New York in Albany, who in 1970 was the first to demonstrate mirror self-recognition in captive chimpanzees. When most animals encounter their reflections in a... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Men (on the Internet) don’t believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence - The Washington Post - http://www.washingtonpost.com/news...
Men (on the Internet) don’t believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence - The Washington Post
"As a follow-up to recent studies on sexism and harassment in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), researchers studied the Internet's reaction to the evidence those studies provided — and it turned out the way you'd expect, if you've ever been on the Internet. Male commenters flipped out. The new study's results were published Thursday in the journal Psychology of Women Quarterly. To see how different genders reacted to evidence of bias in science (on the Internet, anyway), the researchers looked at the comment threads of three articles about studies on the issue, and quantified the responses. Several scientific studies have shown that a gender gap exists in science, technology, engineering and math fields, with women losing out all the way up and down the pipeline of academia and industry. In 2012, researchers from Yale published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that indicated unconscious gender biases in hiring processes for women in... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Citizen science: creating an inclusive network for conservation | Science | The Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/science...
Citizen science: creating an inclusive network for conservation | Science | The Guardian
Citizen science: creating an inclusive network for conservation | Science | The Guardian
"Justin Steventon and I developed the CyberTracker to test a simple hypothesis: the art of tracking may be the origin of science. In 1999 Benadie co-authored a paper published in the journal Pachyderm. This paper demonstrated that a non-literate tracker can create a scientific hypothesis, and independently gather the data needed to confirm this hypothesis. Science may have evolved more than 100,000 years ago with the evolution of modern hunter-gatherers. Scientific reasoning may therefore be an innate ability of the human mind. The implication of this theory is that anyone, regardless of their level of education, whether or not they can read or write and regardless of their cultural background can become citizen scientists, and make fundamental contributions to science. From its origins in the Karoo and the Kalahari, CyberTracker projects have now been initiated across the globe. From monitoring gorillas in the Congo, tracking snow leopards in the Himalayas, tracking jaguars in Costa... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
"In September 1996 we tested the first iteration of a handheld data capture software called CyberTracker in the Karoo National Park in South Africa. Karel Benadie, a tracker who cannot read or write, selected an icon depicting the black rhino on the touch-screen of an Apple Newton handheld computer. On the next screen, which displayed icons of different animal activities, he selected... more... - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
A New Antibiotic That Resists Resistance – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science - http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015...
A New Antibiotic That Resists Resistance – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science
"The British chemist Lesley Orgel had a rule: Evolution is cleverer than you. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have repeatedly proven him right. Since humans started making antibiotics for ourselves in the 1940s, bacteria have evolved to counteract our efforts. They are now winning. There are strains of old foes that withstand everything we can throw at them. Meanwhile, our arsenal has dried up. Before 1962, scientists developed more than 20 new classes of antibiotics. Since then, they have made two. More, hopefully, are coming. A team of scientists led by Kim Lewis from Northeastern University have identified a new antibiotic called teixobactin, which kills some kinds of bacteria by preventing them from building their outer coats. They used it to successfully treat antibiotic-resistant infections in mice. And more importantly, when they tried to deliberately evolve strains of bacteria that resist the drug, they failed. Teixobactin appears resistant to resistance. Bacteria will... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Promising Antibiotic Discovered in Microbial ‘Dark Matter’ - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Promising Antibiotic Discovered in Microbial ‘Dark Matter’ - Scientific American
"An antibiotic with the ability to vanquish drug-resistant pathogens has been discovered — through a soil bacterium found just beneath the surface of a grassy field in Maine. Although the new antibiotic has yet to be tested in people, there are signs that pathogens will be slow to evolve resistance to it." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
"Today in Nature, a team led by Kim Lewis of Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, report that the antibiotic, which they have named teixobactin, was active against the deadly bacterium MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in mice, and a host of other pathogens in cell cultures. If the compound behaves similarly in people, it may prove to be a much-needed triumph in the war against antibiotic-resistance." - imabonehead
Wow, awesome! :) - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
Neil deGrasse Tyson Gets His Own Late Night Talk Show | Mediaite - http://www.mediaite.com/tv...
Neil deGrasse Tyson Gets His Own Late Night Talk Show | Mediaite
"America’s favorite astrophysicist and host of Fox’s rebooted Cosmos series Neil deGrasse Tyson has made numerous appearances on shows like The Colbert Report and Real Time with Bill Maher. But this spring, he will get the opportunity to host his own late night talk show of sorts on the National Geographic Channel. Star Talk, which is also the name of the host’s popular podcast, will be taped in front of a live audience at the American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium in New York City, where Tyson serves as director. It is scheduled to premiere some time in April. “Cosmos allowed us to share the awesome power of the universe with a global audience in ways that we never thought possible,” Tyson said in a statement. “To be able to continue to spread wonder and excitement through Star Talk, which is a true passion project for me, is beyond exciting. And National Geographic Channel is the perfect home as we continue to explore the universe.”" - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
When conservation efforts lead to slaughter - life - 07 January 2015 - New Scientist - http://www.newscientist.com/article...
When conservation efforts lead to slaughter - life - 07 January 2015 - New Scientist
"SURROUNDED by a wall of fire and angry Tanzanian villagers, the elephants were forced off a cliff some 50 metres high. When the dust settled, six of the herd lay dead. The now jubilant crowd took selfies among the carcasses (see a later photo of the scene). It was a violent climax to a long-simmering conflict, which saw farmers regularly lose harvests as protected elephants raided their crops. But on that summer's evening in 2009, the inhabitants of West Kilimanjaro reached breaking point, says Sayuni Mariki at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Unfortunately, the incident is far from an isolated one. People regularly risk injury and prosecution to attack protected wildlife. Tigers and leopards have been beaten to death, wolves are illegally hunted and birds of prey fall victim to poison, to name just a few. On the surface the motives seem simple: protecting people and their property. Scratch a little deeper though, says Mariki, and it becomes clear that the animals are often... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance : Nature : Nature Publishing Group - http://www.nature.com/nature...
A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance : Nature : Nature Publishing Group
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"Antibiotic resistance is spreading faster than the introduction of new compounds into clinical practice, causing a public health crisis. Most antibiotics were produced by screening soil microorganisms, but this limited resource of cultivable bacteria was overmined by the 1960s. Synthetic approaches to produce antibiotics have been unable to replace this platform. Uncultured bacteria make up approximately 99% of all species in external environments, and are an untapped source of new antibiotics. We developed several methods to grow uncultured organisms by cultivation in situ or by using specific growth factors. Here we report a new antibiotic that we term teixobactin, discovered in a screen of uncultured bacteria. Teixobactin inhibits cell wall synthesis by binding to a highly conserved motif of lipid II (precursor of peptidoglycan) and lipid III (precursor of cell wall teichoic acid). We did not obtain any mutants of Staphylococcus aureus or Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Snail named for cement company that could make it extinct - Science News - redOrbit - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Snail named for cement company that could make it extinct - Science News - redOrbit
"For the first time ever, a newly-discovered species has been named after a corporation that could decide whether or not it becomes extinct. Call it eco-blackmail or savvy conservationism, the naming of the recently-found Charopa lafargei snail is a direct attempt to save it, as concrete conglomerate LaFarge is currently in the middle of excavating the limestone hill that could be its sole habitat on Earth. Located in Peninsular Malaysia, the limestone hill is slowly being converted into a quarry by LaFarge, which harvests the stone as a raw material for cement production. The land set aside for the quarry has also recently yielded other new species – including another snail, three plants, a trapdoor spider and a new type of bent-toed gecko. Generally speaking, the process of naming a new species isn’t driven by whimsy. First the unique organism has to be described and revealed to be currently unknown to science. The candidate is then designated with a new two-part name, typically... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Ugh. :( - Jenny H. from Android
imabonehead
200-Year-Old Whale May Give Clues to Human Longevity - Health News and Views - Health.com - http://news.health.com/2015...
200-Year-Old Whale May Give Clues to Human Longevity - Health News and Views - Health.com
"A whale that lives more than 200 years with no signs of age-related disease may give scientists new insight on how people can live longer, healthier lives, a new study finds. For the first time, British researchers have completed the genetic map (“genome”) of a large whale — the bowhead whale. In doing so, they spotted key differences between the genome of the bowhead whale and other mammals." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
UK scientists plan to grow lettuce on Mars - Telegraph - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news...
UK scientists plan to grow lettuce on Mars - Telegraph
"A team of scientists have created a plan to grow lettuce on Mars, and it has been short-listed to be included in a future space flight to the red planet. The project, being run at the University of Southampton, aims to put the first life on Mars by growing the salad vegetable in a greenhouse which will use the atmosphere and sunlight to help it grow. The plan is one of 10 short-listed university projects, and the only one from the UK, to be selected for potential inclusion in the payload for the Mars One landing in 2018. Project leader Suzanna Lucarotti said: "To live on other planets we need to grow food there. No-one has ever actually done this and we intend to be the first. "This plan is both technically feasible and incredibly ambitious in its scope, for we will be bringing the first complex life to another planet. Related Articles Nasa tests new camera for HD Earth 07 May 2014 Timelapse of 'blood moon' eclipse 15 Apr 2014 Nasa tests growing lettuce in space 07 May 2014 "Growing... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Eating Whole Grains May Be Linked to Living Longer - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
"People who eat more whole grains live longer and are less likely to die of heart disease, according to an analysis of two large studies. Earlier studies had linked whole grains to a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, the researchers say. “Reading the ingredients of food labels, consumers will know whether the food contains any whole grain contents,” said senior author Dr. Qi Sun of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Common types of whole grains include whole wheat flour, brown rice, whole oats, whole cornmeal, and popcorn, Sun told Reuters Health by email." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
DNA barcoding: a new tool for palm taxonomists? - AoB Blog - http://aobblog.com/2011...
DNA barcoding: a new tool for palm taxonomists? - AoB Blog
"DNA barcoding: a new tool for palm taxonomists? DNA barcoding: a new tool for palm taxonomists? Although taxonomy of palms (Arecaceae) is fairly well known, many problems remain and this is, in part, due to the difficultly of representing palm diversity with herbarium specimens. For the first time in Arecaceae, Jeanson et al. test the ultility of DNA barcoding, examining 40 out of the 48 species of the south-east Asian tribe Caryoteae (subfamily Coryphoideae). The results show 92 % species’ discrimination, which is a high rate for a barcoding experiment. They find that the two recommended ‘core’ markers, rbcL and matK, have a low discrimination rate and need to be supplemented by another marker, with nrITS2 being the preferred choice for Caryoteae." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Genome Biology | Abstract | Comparative population genomics reveals the domestication history of the peach, - http://genomebiology.com/2014...
Genome Biology | Abstract | Comparative population genomics reveals the domestication history of the peach,
"Recently, many studies utilizing next generation sequencing have investigated plant evolution and domestication in annual crops. Peach, Prunus persica, is a typical perennial fruit crop that has ornamental and edible varieties. Unlike other fruit crops, cultivated peach includes a large number of phenotypes but few polymorphisms. In this study, we explore the genetic basis of domestication in peach and the influence of humans on its evolution. Results We perform large-scale resequencing of 10 wild and 74 cultivated peach varieties, including 9 ornamental, 23 breeding, and 42 landrace lines. We identify 4.6 million SNPs, a large number of which could explain the phenotypic variation in cultivated peach. Population analysis shows a single domestication event, the speciation of P. persica from wild peach. Ornamental and edible peach both belong to P. persica, along with another geographically separated subgroup, Prunus ferganensis. We identify 147 and 262 genes under edible and... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Fasting for three days can regenerate entire immune system, study finds - Telegraph - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news...
Fasting for three days can regenerate entire immune system, study finds - Telegraph
"Fasting for as little as three days can regenerate the entire immune system, even in the elderly, scientists have found in a breakthrough described as "remarkable". Although fasting diets have been criticised by nutritionists for being unhealthy, new research suggests starving the body kick-starts stem cells into producing new white blood cells, which fight off infection. Scientists at the University of Southern California say the discovery could be particularly beneficial for people suffering from damaged immune systems, such as cancer patients on chemotherapy." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Inside the Mysterious Underground City That's 5,000 Years Old - ABC News - http://abcnews.go.com/Interna...
Inside the Mysterious Underground City That's 5,000 Years Old - ABC News
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"The discovery of a previously unknown ancient city came as a late Christmas present for archaeologists in Turkey when they made a major find on Dec. 28. A series of ruins that contain buildings, hidden churches and water channels was found in the Turkish town of Nevsehir, which is known for 'fairy chimney' rock formations." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Dark Chocolate Could Improve Memory By 25%, But You'd Have to Eat Seven Bars a Day — NOVA Next | PBS - http://www.pbs.org/wgbh...
Dark Chocolate Could Improve Memory By 25%, But You'd Have to Eat Seven Bars a Day — NOVA Next | PBS
"For years, scientists have been trying to prove that chocolate is good for us. The idea was based on more than the desires of a sweet-toothed scientist—cocoa is high in antioxidants known as flavanols. But proving those hypothetical health benefits hasn’t been easy. Now, there’s new evidence to suggest that chocolate dramatically improves the memory skills that people lose with age. When healthy people between the ages of 50 and 69 drank a mixture high in cocoa flavanols for three months, they performed about 25% better on a memory test compared to a control group of participants. Dr. Scott A. Small, a neurologist at Columbia University Medical Center, led the study, which was funded by the chocolate company Mars, the National Institutes of Health, and two other research foundations. The results were published yesterday in Nature Neuroscience. dark-chocolate_1024x576 When healthy people ages 50 to 69 drank a mixture high in cocoa flavanols for three months, they performed about 25%... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
7 bars a day? I am up to the task! - Spidra Webster
Me too. I think we have a new resolution for 2015! :D - Hookuh Tinypants
I could maybe make that happen. - Eric - ill subliminal
I'm noshing on a TJ's Pound Plus Extravaganza dark chocolate bar at this very moment. It's funny that Mars sponsored it given that their chocolate, even their dark chocolate, has fewer cocoa solids than good chocolate... - Spidra Webster
Halil
Brushing your teeth with the remains of dead stars - Space News - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Brushing your teeth with the remains of dead stars - Space News
the element fluorine (which, through gaining an electron, becomes fluoride) is found in products such as toothpaste and chewing gum, but its origins have long been somewhat of a mystery. There have been three preeminent theories about how the chemical element was created, and the findings of the new study support the one which claims that it was formed in giant red stars at the end of their life cycles. Our sun and planets were made from materials from these dead stars, and likewise, the fluorine in our toothpaste might have been created from the sun’s ancestors. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Well, we are created from dead stars too. - Joe
imabonehead
Banking Culture Encourages Dishonesty - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Banking Culture Encourages Dishonesty - Scientific American
"Across the globe, many people and institutions suffered large costs from the 2008 financial meltdown. Among the victims is the financial sector itself—whose reputation has been questioned after scandals involving the manipulation of interest rates and fraudulent deals. In trying to make sense of the crisis, some have pointed the fingers to individual bankers and banks, others to institutional pressures. But new research suggests that one important cause may reside elsewhere: in the banking culture itself. A paper recently published in Nature magazine found that the financial sector’s culture encourages dishonesty." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2011...&
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com
"LAST FALL, President Obama threw what was billed as the first White House Science Fair, a photo op in the gilt-mirrored State Dining Room. He tested a steering wheel designed by middle schoolers to detect distracted driving and peeked inside a robot that plays soccer. It was meant as an inspirational moment: children, science is fun; work harder. Politicians and educators have been wringing their hands for years over test scores showing American students falling behind their counterparts in Slovenia and Singapore. How will the United States stack up against global rivals in innovation? The president and industry groups have called on colleges to graduate 10,000 more engineers a year and 100,000 new teachers with majors in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math. All the Sputnik-like urgency has put classrooms from kindergarten through 12th grade — the pipeline, as they call it — under a microscope. And there are encouraging signs, with surveys showing the number of college... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Fwd: RT @mbeisen: will be hosting an AMA with @RedditScience on #openaccess, @plos and reforming science publishing on January 9th - details to come @reddit (via http://friendfeed.com/spidra)
Spidra Webster
Reading from tablets before bed alters sleep cycles - LA Times - http://www.latimes.com/science...
Reading from tablets before bed alters sleep cycles - LA Times
"If you’re in bed reading this, you may feel sleepy tomorrow morning. A study has found that reading from a light-emitting device, such as an e-reader, before bedtime can shift your body’s natural clock and delay the onset and characteristics of your sleep. And that could leave you feeling more groggy the morning after, according to the study published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Working nights or odd hours can sap mental function, study finds Working nights or odd hours can sap mental function, study finds A dozen people checked into the sleep lab at Boston's Brigham and Women’s Hospital and stayed for two weeks. During that time, each spent five consecutive evenings reading a book for four hours under reflected light, and five evenings viewing an iPad for the same duration (the order of the five-day blocks was randomly assigned). All had a mandatory bedtime of 10 p.m. and a 6 a.m. wake-up. lRelated Disrupted sleep linked to higher... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
"Even a brilliant dog may not be able to count as high as the number of feet she has. In a cheese cube counting challenge, dogs struggled to prove they have any number sense at all. Embarrassingly for the dogs, some wolves took the exact same test and passed it. This may be a hint about what dogs lost when they moved to a cushy life of domestication. At the Wolf Science Center in Austria, Friederike Range and her colleagues raise both wolves and dogs by hand, then train them to take part in cognition research projects. Their interest in canine counting skill isn’t totally trivial. In nature, a little bit of number sense might help animals choose the best food source or hunting spot. It also helps to know whether another pack of animals is bigger than yours before getting in a fight. If dogs have any grasp of numbers, they should be able to judge two sets of food items—say, three versus four Milk-Bones—and pick the bigger snack. Earlier research found that dogs are OK at this, but only... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
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