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Science News

Science News

News and discussion about interesting topics from the world of science.
imabonehead
BBC News - Paralysed man walks again after cell transplant - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Paralysed man walks again after cell transplant
"A paralysed man has been able to walk again after a pioneering therapy that involved transplanting cells from his nasal cavity into his spinal cord." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Wow just wow You have no idea how this affects someone with IBM Maybe cell transplantation...... - WarLord
Spidra Webster
Emergence and early evolution of fungicide resistance in North American populations of Zymoseptoria tritici - Estep - Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...
Emergence and early evolution of fungicide resistance in North American populations of Zymoseptoria tritici - Estep - Plant Pathology - Wiley Online Library
"Although fungicide resistance in crop pathogens is a global threat to food production, surprisingly little is known about the evolutionary processes associated with the emergence and spread of fungicide resistance. Early stages in the evolution of fungicide resistance were evaluated using the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici, taking advantage of an isolate collection spanning 20 years in Oregon, USA, and including two sites with differing intensity of fungicide use. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytb protein conferring single-mutation resistance to QoI fungicides and the nuclear CYP51 gene implicated in multiple-mutation resistance to azole fungicides were analyzed. Mutations associated with resistance to both fungicides were absent in the 1992 isolates, but frequent in the 2012 collection, with higher frequencies of resistance alleles found at the field site with more intensive fungicide use. Results suggest that the QoI resistance evolved independently in several lineages, and... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Head injury causes immune system to attack brain, new study finds -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
"Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. A new study showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like football, rugby and boxing." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Vast Study Casts Doubts on Value of Mammograms - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2014...
Vast Study Casts Doubts on Value of Mammograms - NYTimes.com
"One of the largest and most meticulous studies of mammography ever done, involving 90,000 women and lasting a quarter-century, has added powerful new doubts about the value of the screening test for women of any age. It found that the death rates from breast cancer and from all causes were the same in women who got mammograms and those who did not. And the screening had harms: One in five cancers found with mammography and treated was not a threat to the woman’s health and did not need treatment such as chemotherapy, surgery or radiation. The study, published Tuesday in The British Medical Journal, is one of the few rigorous evaluations of mammograms conducted in the modern era of more effective breast cancer treatments. It randomly assigned Canadian women to have regular mammograms and breast exams by trained nurses or to have breast exams alone. Continue reading the main story Related Coverage For Women, a More Complicated Choice on MammogramsFEB. 11, 2014 Researchers sought to... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Charles Stibs
Spidra Webster
Will crabs invade Antarctica? - Conservation - http://conservationmagazine.org/2014...
Will crabs invade Antarctica? - Conservation
"Many predatory crabs don’t live in Antarctica for a simple reason: it’s too cold. But as the Earth warms, these clawed critters could invade pristine polar waters and threaten native species, scientists warn in an editorial. The Southern Ocean “has traditionally been regarded as the most biologically isolated and invasion-resistant ocean,” the team writes in the Journal of Biogeography. Predatory crabs, known as “shell-breaking” crabs, probably haven’t lived in the area for millions of years. One reason is that many of these species can’t control the levels of magnesium ions in their bodies very well. In such a cold environment, high magnesium levels lead to paralysis and death. But some crabs may find a way to survive. In February 2010, one of the co-authors discovered an adult female crab from the species Halicarcinus planatus on Deception Island, near the western Antarctic Peninsula. Normally, these crabs stick to warmer areas such as South America, New Zealand, and the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
interesting - Steve C Team Marina
Spidra Webster
RT @NobelPrize #nobelprize2014 “for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”
RT ‏@NatureNews Physics Nobel Prize to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano & Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Insights into the Early Epidemic Spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone Provided by Viral Sequence Data – PLOS Currents Outbreaks - http://currents.plos.org/outbrea...
"Background and Methodology: The current Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa has been spreading at least since December 2013. The first confirmed case of Ebola virus in Sierra Leone was identified on May 25. Based on viral genetic sequencing data from 72 individuals in Sierra Leone collected between the end of May and mid June, we utilize a range of phylodynamic methods to estimate the basic reproductive number (R0). We additionally estimate the expected lengths of the incubation and infectious periods of the virus. Finally, we use phylogenetic trees to examine the role played by population structure in the epidemic. Results: The median estimates of R0 based on sequencing data alone range between 1.65-2.18, with the most plausible model yielding a median R0 of 2.18 (95% HPD 1.24-3.55). Importantly, our results indicate that, at least until mid June, relief efforts in Sierra Leone were ineffective at lowering the effective reproductive number of the virus. We estimate the expected... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Super Yeast Tolerates Heat and Alcohol - Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
Super Yeast Tolerates Heat and Alcohol - Scientific American
"Yeast may be essential to producing ethanol through fermentation, but for years, biofuel production has been constrained by the fact that heat and ethanol itself can be deadly or damaging to yeast at high levels. Recently, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found ways to ameliorate both of these production problems. They published their research yesterday in the journal Science. Jens Nielsen, a professor of systems biology at Chalmers University of Technology, was among the researchers interested in improving yeast's heat tolerance." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Halil
Antarctica Has Lost Enough Ice to Cause a Measurable Shift in Gravity - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Antarctica Has Lost Enough Ice to Cause a Measurable Shift in Gravity
“The loss of ice from West Antarctica between 2009 and 2012 caused a dip in the gravity field over the region,” writes the ESA, whose GOCE satellite measured the change. Apparently, melting billions of tons of ice year after year has implications that would make even Isaac Newton blanch. - Halil from Bookmarklet
GuЄrriЄR◦٭*℃éLЄs†Є
Water on Earth is found to be older than the Sun http://sen.com/news...
GuЄrriЄR◦٭*℃éLЄs†Є
New study claims black holes are mathematically impossible http://www.geek.com/science...
Spidra Webster
Scientists confess to sneaking Bob Dylan lyrics into their work for the past 17 years - The Washington Post - http://www.washingtonpost.com/news...
Scientists confess to sneaking Bob Dylan lyrics into their work for the past 17 years - The Washington Post
"While writing an article about intestinal gasses 17 years ago, Karolinska Institute researchers John Lundberg and Eddie Weitzberg couldn't resist a punny title: "Nitric Oxide and inflammation: The answer is blowing in the wind". Thus began their descent down the slippery slope of Bob Dylan call-outs. While the two men never put lyrics into their peer-reviewed studies, The Local Sweden reports, they started a personal tradition of getting as many Dylan quotes as possible into everything else they wrote -- articles about other peoples' work, editorials, book introductions, and so on. Soon, the pun ring doubled in size. After another two researchers (also at Karolinska, where Dylan is apparently a big thing) published an article called "Blood on the tracks: a simple twist of fate," a librarian connected the foursome. A fifth scientist joined the group when his article "Tangled up in blue: Molecular cardiology in the postmolecular era" hit the stands. Now, the researchers say, they have... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Halil
Enzyme-Blocking Molecule Could Be Used To Fight Cancer And Many Other Diseases - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Exciting stuff and looks promising. However, enzymes don't just affect one protein/pathway, a single enzymes activity often plays an important role in a myriad of cellular pathways, so simply blocking this one enzyme sounds simple enough until you discover that doing so may result in undesirable side effects because you're also blocking some other vital cellular activity. Therefore any future research must also consider all cellular activity affected by blocking this one protein. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Ladybird developer awarded researcher of the year - News and Events - University of Sydney - http://sydney.edu.au/news...
Ladybird developer awarded researcher of the year - News and Events - University of Sydney
"University of Sydney robotics expert Professor Salah Sukkarieh has been awarded "Researcher of the Year " by the Australian Vegetable Industry 's peak body Ausveg for his work on intelligent farm robots, in particular the"Ladybird". The "Ladybird " was designed and built specifically for the vegetable industry with the aim of creating a ground robot with supporting intelligent software and the capability to conduct autonomous farm surveillance, mapping, classification, and detection for a variety of different vegetables. Professor Sukkarieh who leads a research team dedicated to the advancement of agricultural robotics says his group aims to redefine key areas of field robotics such as sensory technology, materials development and complex autonomous mechanisms. He says the automation of on-farm processes is poised to play a decisive role in minimising input and maximising output of future agriculture. Automation can help to increase efficiency and yield, by having many of the manual... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves : Nature News & Comment - http://www.nature.com/news...
Forensic chemistry could stop African plant thieves : Nature News & Comment
"Scarred earth meets visitors at the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden in Cape Town where some of South Africa's rarest plants once stood. In August, 24 of the park's cycads were stolen, probably to be sold on the black market as landscaping ornaments. Special relativity aces time trial Infectious disease: Ebola’s lost ward Chinese science gets mass transformation Now, in a last-ditch attempt to save several endangered species from extinction, scientists are turning to forensic methods to see if tracking the history of suspect plants can help to bring illegal traders to book. But time is running out for the plants, which are even more threatened than the country’s emblematic rhinos. South Africa’s endemic cycads — which look like a cross between a palm and a pineapple tree — rank among the most endangered plants in the world. Of the country’s 38 cycad species, three are already extinct in the wild, and 12 others are critically endangered. Cycads grow slowly, and can live for... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
I'd heard of cycad theft. My prof told me how bad it is. A new cycad species was discovered and wiped out within months of the botanist publishing on the species. So now botanists don't say where a new cycad species location is for fear of thievery. Once more the rich commission theft to order, just as they do with art treasures. - Spidra Webster
Halil
Irish teens' idea of using bacteria to improve crop yields wins Google Science Fair prize - http://phys.org/news...
Irish teens' idea of using bacteria to improve crop yields wins Google Science Fair prize
After discovering nodules growing on pea plants in a family garden, which turned out to be the result of a reaction by the plant to bacteria in the soil, the teens began an investigation. They learned that the presence of certain bacteria can instill a sort of fear in a plant, causing it to speed up germination, so as to avoid being overtaken. They wondered what would happen if seeds were treated with a bacteria laden liquid before planting. To find out, they planted a garden with several different types of plants, some with treated seeds, others without, then tended the garden to see what impact the treatment would have. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Awesome find! - Halil
imabonehead
Artificial sweeteners linked to glucose intolerance - health - 17 September 2014 - New Scientist - http://www.newscientist.com/article...
Artificial sweeteners linked to glucose intolerance - health - 17 September 2014 - New Scientist
"ARTIFICIAL sweeteners can cause glucose intolerance in mice, and perhaps in humans, by altering gut bacteria, a series of experiments suggests. Although artificial sweeteners – among the world's most widely used food additives – are approved by most food regulation agencies as safe for humans, the researchers who led the work suggest that their use should be reassessed." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Big Joe Silence
The Big Picture: NASA gets ready to build the 'next great rocket' - http://www.engadget.com/2014...
The Big Picture: NASA gets ready to build the 'next great rocket'
"See the gargantuan structure above that dwarfs that line of puny humans at the bottom (bet you didn't even notice them at first glance, huh)? It's a welding tool -- the biggest one built for spacecraft, in fact, that's slated to help Boeing build the core stage of NASA's Space Launch System at the agency's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The structure's officially called the Vertical Assembly Center, and it stands 170 feet tall with a width that measures 78 feet: not exactly surprising, considering the SLS is a 200-foot-tall behemoth. It's but one of the many tools Boeing intends to use to build the core stage of NASA's "most powerful rocket ever" after the two organizations finalized their $2.8 billion deal in July. The core stage will house cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen used to power the rocket's four engines, and building it brings the SLS much closer to the launch pad for deep space exploration." - Big Joe Silence from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Popular Sedative Benzodiazepines 'Linked To Increased Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease' - http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014...
Popular Sedative Benzodiazepines 'Linked To Increased Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease'
"As the most common form of dementia, Alzheimer's disease affects almost 500,000 people in the UK. Although the cause is currently unknown, there are many factors believed to increase the risk of developing the condition. Most recently, popular sedative Benzodiazepines, which are widely prescribed to treat anxiety and insomnia, have been associated with a heightened risk of developing the condition, particularly for long-term users." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Do farts carry germs? Depends... (Science Alert) - http://www.sciencealert.com.au/feature...
Do farts carry germs? Depends... (Science Alert)
"Do farts carry germs? It’s probably something you’ve never thought about, but now that you’ve heard the question, we bet you’re sort of curious. But be warned, this isn’t going to be pretty. “It all started with an enquiry from a nurse,” said Dr Karl Kruszelnicki during his science show on the Triple J radio station in Brisbane, Australia. “She wanted to know whether she was contaminating the operating theatre she worked in by quietly farting in the sterile environment during operations, and I realised that I didn’t know. But I was determined to find out.” According to the Seriously, Science blog at Discover Magazine, Kruszelnicki investigated the question by getting in contact with Canberra-based microbiologist, Luke Tennent, who helped him design and carry out an experiment. The aim was to discover whether or not the wind emitted from a human was filled with germs or just simply smelt bad. Kruszelnicki explained what happened next: “[Tennent] asked a colleague to break wind... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Halil
Extinctions during human era worse than thought | News from Brown - http://news.brown.edu/article...
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — It’s hard to comprehend how bad the current rate of species extinction around the world has become without knowing what it was before people came along. The newest estimate is that the pre-human rate was 10 times lower than scientists had thought, which means that the current level is 10 times worse. - Halil from Bookmarklet
The new study next examined evidence from the evolutionary family trees — phylogenies — of numerous plant and animal species. Phylogenies, constructed by studying DNA, trace how groups of species have changed over time, adding new genetic lineages and losing unsuccessful ones. They provide rich details of how species have diversified over time. - Halil
Bluesun 2600
Did The Giant Sloth Die Out Less Than 150 Years Ago? - http://io9.com/did-the...
Did The Giant Sloth Die Out Less Than 150 Years Ago?
Did The Giant Sloth Die Out Less Than 150 Years Ago?
Spidra Webster
AP: The Buzz on Caffeine in Coffee: A Genetic Quirk - http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic...
AP: The Buzz on Caffeine in Coffee: A Genetic Quirk
"WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists have woken up and smelled the coffee - and analyzed its DNA. They found that what we love about coffee - the caffeine - is a genetic quirk, not related to the caffeine in chocolate or tea. "It's an accident that has been frozen in place very likely by the influence of natural selection," says University of Buffalo evolutionary biologist Victor Albert. He and more than 60 other researchers from around the world mapped out the genetic instruction book of java. Their results were published Thursday in the journal Science. Albert says researchers discovered that caffeine developed separately in the coffee, tea and chocolate because it is in different genes in different areas of plants' genomes. But once coffee mutated to have caffeine - not just in the bean, there's even more in the leaves - it turned out to be a good thing for the plant, Albert says. Bugs don't chew on the coffee plant leaves because they don't like the caffeine, but pollinators like bees... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
imabonehead
Why no one should freak out about the giant crack that opened in the Mexico desert - The Washington Post - http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...
Why no one should freak out about the giant crack that opened in the Mexico desert - The Washington Post
"On the issue of the huge gaping chasm that opened in the Mexican desert earlier this month, scientists have assured us this does not herald the end of days. The chair of the geology department at the University of Sonora, in the northern Mexican state where this “topographic accident” emerged, said that the fissure was likely caused by sucking out groundwater for irrigation to the point the surface collapsed." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
nothing to see here, carry on; o' you cant, the roads broke, :/ - chaz2b
Aw, crap. That's where I buried Yog-Sothoth. I knew I should have used a better lock. - Vampire Hunter DYSP from Android
'no one should should freak out about the salt in your drinking water or fields. this is just the normal manifestation of lowered aquifer water pressure' ... 'no one should should freak out about the huge gaping chasm. these are normal manifestations of the destabilization of the ground.” ...'no one should should freak out about the collapse of the agricultural industry. this is just... more... - exador23
Spidra Webster
BBC News - Deep sea 'mushroom' may be new branch of life - http://www.bbc.com/news...
BBC News - Deep sea 'mushroom' may be new branch of life
Show all
"A mushroom-shaped sea animal discovered off the Australian coast has defied classification in the tree of life. A team of scientists at the University of Copenhagen says the tiny organism does not fit into any of the known subdivisions of the animal kingdom. Such a situation has occurred only a handful of times in the last 100 years. The organisms, which were originally collected in 1986, are described in the academic journal Plos One. The authors of the article note several similarities with the bizarre and enigmatic soft-bodied life forms that lived between 635 and 540 million years ago - the span of Earth history known as the Ediacaran Period. Continue reading the main story “ Start Quote We think it belongs in the animal kingdom somewhere, the question is where” Jorgen Olesen University of Copenhagen These organisms, too, have proven difficult to categorise and some researchers have even suggested they were failed experiments in multi-cellular life. The authors of the paper... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
OK, that's cool. - Jennifer Dittrich
It'll eventually find it's spot, just like this one did! - Misunderstood Worm-Like Fossil Finds Its Place In The Tree Of Life Read more at http://www.redorbit.com/news... - Halil
imabonehead
Sit Less, Protect Your DNA and Live Longer? - Health News and Views - Health.com - http://news.health.com/2014...
Sit Less, Protect Your DNA and Live Longer? - Health News and Views - Health.com
"Spending less time sitting might increase your lifespan by keeping your DNA young, Swedish researchers say. More time spent on your feet appears to lengthen bits of DNA called telomeres. Telomeres, which protect the end of chromosomes (like the tips that keep shoelaces from fraying), tend to get shorter and shorter until they can’t shorten any more, causing cells to die." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
...or work less, play more :) - imabonehead
imabonehead
Poor Quality Sleep May Be Linked to Shrinking Brain - Health News and Views - Health.com - http://news.health.com/2014...
Poor Quality Sleep May Be Linked to Shrinking Brain - Health News and Views - Health.com
"Not getting a good night’s sleep might be linked to shrinkage of the brain’s gray matter over time, new research suggests." - imabonehead from Bookmarklet
Halil
Superabsorbing rings could lead to better cameras and solar cells - http://physicsworld.com/cws...
Superabsorbing rings could lead to better cameras and solar cells
Rings of excited atoms that harness a quantum effect to absorb light at an enhanced rate could be used in future technologies such as highly sensitive cameras, solar cells and systems for optical power transmission. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Mark H
Global warming denial: Claims of Arctic ice recovering are exaggerated. - http://www.slate.com/blogs...
Global warming denial: Claims of Arctic ice recovering are exaggerated.
Global warming denial: Claims of Arctic ice recovering are exaggerated.
"Briefly: Arctic sea ice reaches a minimum in late September every year. The overall trend for the amount of ice at that time is decreasing; in other words, there is less ice all the time. Some years there is more than others, some less. But the trend is down, down, down." - Mark H from Bookmarklet
"The black line is the average for 1981 – 2010. The gray region shows the ±2 standard deviation temperatures for that average; statistically speaking it’s an expected range of temperatures (it’s actually more subtle than that, but that’s enough to understand what’s going on here). The dashed line shows the 2012 ice extent, and is clearly very low, well outside the expected range. The... more... - Mark H
This post is partially true and partially untrue. Why do they have to make their own misleading charts here is the hard data. Are we incapable of interpreting it? http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic... - Eric Logan
Actually it's not their own chart it's the one that best fits the narrative. I have been watching DMI for years. the mean near average is 2001, but we are also very near 2005 numbers and multi year ice another important metric is increasing not decreasing. If you listened to what the alarmists said there was not supposed to be any as in none by now. - Eric Logan
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