Science News

Science News

News and discussion about interesting topics from the world of science.
Spidra Webster
Keeping affected countries onside hampered Ebola fight - health - 23 March 2015 - New Scientist - http://www.newscientist.com/article...
Keeping affected countries onside hampered Ebola fight - health - 23 March 2015 - New Scientist
"The first assessments of what allowed Ebola to spin out of control in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are now trickling in. Fingers, unavoidably, are pointing at the World Health Organization. But a closer analysis shows the story is one of a dysfunctional international health system which the WHO has neither the means nor the power to lead, especially without support from national governments. That doesn't bode well for future outbreaks. In a report published on Sunday, the aid group Médecins sans Frontières, which provided most of the medical care in the outbreak, says the WHO's lack of leadership prompted the United Nations to set up an emergency unit to manage the Ebola response, the first of its kind for a public health issue. MSF called the outbreak "unprecedented" on 31 March, because it had already spread so far, only to be contradicted by the WHO. Treading too carefully The WHO seems to have been trying to avoid alienating the affected countries, whose cooperation the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Halil
Converting packing peanuts to battery components - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Converting packing peanuts to battery components
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Researchers have shown how to convert waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that outperform conventional graphite electrodes, representing an environmentally friendly approach to reuse the waste. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Nice! - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap - Telegraph - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardeni...
Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap - Telegraph
"Most gardeners think they “know” Kew – but is that really the case? It’s a question which arose following the publication of a report into the Royal Botanic Garden’s funding by the parliamentary Science and Technology Committee earlier this month. Their investigation was prompted by the revelation of a £5.5 million “hole” in Kew’s annual budget and the ensuing large-scale redundancies of scientists (47 have gone so far). The committee’s conclusion was damning: “We consider the current financial arrangements for funding to be a recipe for failure.” The MPs were also critical of senior management’s failure to consult its staff over the changes, and the absence, until just a few weeks ago, of a published strategy. For some at Kew, the funding crisis is of minor importance compared with the strategic direction it is now taking under director Richard Deverell, the first non-scientific director of the institution. The fear is that Kew’s international influence is finally being jettisoned... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
A rogue doctor saved a potential miracle drug by storing samples in his home after being told to throw them away - http://www.businessinsider.com/suren-s...
A rogue doctor saved a potential miracle drug by storing samples in his home after being told to throw them away
"Right now, a naturally-produced substance called rapamycin is being described as the source of potentially one of the most transformative medicines in the world, one that has a small but not impossible chance to become the first drug to successfully slow the effects of aging — "the ultimate preventative medicine," as Matt Kaeberlein, a prominent researcher who studies aging at the University of Washington, described it to Bloomberg Businessweek. But — as told in a wide-ranging Bloomberg Businessweek cover story — the only known samples of it would have been destroyed if it weren't for a researcher who was just too intrigued by rapamycin's potential to let that happen. This substance, produced by a bacteria, has already been used to develop treatments for kidney, lung, and breast cancers (Novartis earned more than $1 billion from these treatments in 2013), among many other uses. Yet it wouldn't — couldn't — be the subject of such excited pronouncements, if Dr. Suren Sehgal had obeyed... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis - http://annals.org/article...
Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
"Background: The magnitude, consistency, and manner of association between sedentary time and outcomes independent of physical activity remain unclear. Purpose: To quantify the association between sedentary time and hospitalizations, all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer in adults independent of physical activity. Data Sources: English-language studies in MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar databases were searched through August 2014 with hand-searching of in-text citations and no publication date limitations. Study Selection: Studies assessing sedentary behavior in adults, adjusted for physical activity and correlated to at least 1 outcome. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers performed data abstraction and quality assessment, and a third reviewer resolved inconsistencies. Data Synthesis: Forty-seven articles met our eligibility criteria. Meta-analyses were performed on outcomes for cardiovascular... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Lawsuit over quarter horse's clone may redefine animal breeding - LA Times - http://www.latimes.com/nation...
Lawsuit over quarter horse's clone may redefine animal breeding - LA Times
"Lynx Melody Too, a clone of a renowned quarter horse, is at the center of a lawsuit that could change the world of animal breeding and competition. Texas horse breeder Jason Abraham and veterinarian Gregg Veneklasen sued the American Quarter Horse Assn., claiming that Lynx Melody Too should be allowed to register as an official quarter horse. A Texas jury decided in their favor in 2013, but a three-judge panel of the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that ruling in January, saying there was "insufficient" evidence of wrongdoing by the association. Abraham and Veneklasen are now seeking a rehearing before the full 15-judge circuit panel. Scientists use cloning to make stem cells matched to two adults Scientists use cloning to make stem cells matched to two adults The suit is among the first to deal with the status of clones in breeding and competition, and its outcome could impact a number of fields, including thoroughbred horse racing and dog breeding. The quarter horse... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
http://www.youtube.com/watch... Docs Perform First Successful Penis Transplant
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ly3yLBL4Gtg Docs Perform First Successful Penis Transplant
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Hardcore. But who performs a circumcision on an 18-year old male?!? - Spidra Webster
I wonder what implications this has for FtM transgender folks. - Spidra Webster
Halil
A German biologist and anti-vaxxer who offered €100,000 ($106,300) to anyone who could prove that the disease was a virus has been ordered to pay a doctor who took him up on the offer. - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
A German biologist and anti-vaxxer who offered €100,000 ($106,300) to anyone who could prove that the disease was a virus has been ordered to pay a doctor who took him up on the offer.
Stefan Lanka, who believed that the ailment is actually psychosomatic, promised the reward on his website four years ago, according to BBC News. The bounty was later claimed by a German doctor named David Barden, who presented evidence from six different scientific studies. - Halil from Bookmarklet
پیکولو
Research suggests Mars once had more water than Earth's Arctic ocean - http://phys.org/news...
Research suggests Mars once had more water than Earth's Arctic ocean
A primitive ocean on Mars held more water than Earth's Arctic Ocean, according to NASA scientists who, using ground-based observatories, measured water signatures in the Red Planet's atmosphere. - پیکولو from Bookmarklet
سلام. اون فایلی که برای پیکس برن تی وی ساخته بودی رو میخواستم ممنون. - گرین بیب
کدوم؟ - پیکولو
تو این فید گفته بودی: http://friendfeed.com/farzaam... میخوام برم بانه گفتم موقع خرید چک کنم! - گرین بیب
آها ... چیز خاصی نیست. یه صفحه‌ی سفیده. دایرکتش میکنم - پیکولو
پیکولو نظرت در مورد پروژه های فرستادن اسنان به مریخ چیه؟ به نظرت جاهایی مثل NASA و ESA موفق میشن یا بخش خصوصی؟ - سین به توان چهار
بنظرم اول آژانس‌های دولتی از عهده‌ش برمیان. اما اسکان در مریخ خیلی دور از ذهن بنظر میرسه. یعنی فکر میکنم دست کم رویای پنج دهه آینده‌س - پیکولو
شاید به پنج دهه نکشه ولی به این زودی ها هم نخواهد بود. مگر اینکه اتفاق خیلی خاصی بیافته. من فقط این احساس رو دارم که این رقابت فضایی یکم کم شده. - سین به توان چهار
Spidra Webster
For legume plants, a new route from shoot to root - http://phys.org/news...
For legume plants, a new route from shoot to root
For legume plants, a new route from shoot to root
"A new study shows that legume plants regulate their symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria by using cytokinins—signaling molecules— that are transmitted through the plant structure from leaves into the roots to control the number of bacteria-holding nodules in the roots. This collaborative study was conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Basic Biology, the Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), and the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan. Legumes, an important plant family which includes lentils, soybeans, and peanuts, have the ability to prosper in nitrogen-poor soil environments thanks to an ingenious adaptation: they develop a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia, allowing the bacteria to infect them within special structures known as nodules that are located along their roots. However, it takes energy to produce and maintain these nodules, hurting the ability of the plant to grow, so legumes... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
"This study, together with previous research results, clearly shows that cytokinins are key signaling molecules in organ-to-organ communication, allowing balanced plant growth and development, and opens the road to identifying the exact cytokinin involved in downward signaling in the Lotus japonicus. According to Hitoshi Sakakibara, who led the RIKEN group participating in the project,... more... - Spidra Webster
پیکولو
10 Breakthrough Technologies 2015 | MIT Technology Review - http://www.technologyreview.com/lists...
Halil
Nobel winners urge European Commission not to cut funds for science - Experts angry as EC boss plans to slash the research and innovation budget by £2bn - http://www.independent.co.uk/news...
Nobel winners urge European Commission not to cut funds for science - Experts angry as EC boss plans to slash the research and innovation budget by £2bn
Dozens of Nobel prize-winners have written to the President of the European Commission urging him to reverse his plan to slash EU spending on research and innovation by €2.7bn (£2bn). - Halil from Bookmarklet
But in a letter seen by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, 27 Nobel laureates express their “dismay” at the plan and warn that Europe’s reputation in high-profile research fields would be severely damaged. - Halil
Halil
Scientists announce anti-HIV agent so powerful it can work in a vaccine -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Mark H
Earth does not revolve around the Sun after all. http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Earth does not revolve around the Sun after all. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9Jp_XCvVto
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I, for one, am very convinced by the arguments put forward by Saudi Preacher Bandar Al-Khaybari. - Mark H
Both the Quran and the little plastic water container seem to support his case. - Eivind
Halil
Researchers from the US and Israel have identified the first-ever example of a creature capable of editing its own genetic makeup in order to blend into its surroundings – the squid. - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Researchers from the US and Israel have identified the first-ever example of a creature capable of editing its own genetic makeup in order to blend into its surroundings – the squid.
Reporting in a recent edition of the journal eLife, Dr. Eli Eisenberg of the Tel Aviv University Department of Physics and Sagol School of Neuroscience and his colleagues explained that the Doryteuthis pealieii squid can alter most of its own proteins on an as-needed basis. - Halil from Bookmarklet
:o - Halil
I wonder if this will help understand and potentially help create treatment for prion based diseases? - Halil
Huh. That would be pretty amazing - I admit, I find prion diseases to be some of the most frightening. - Jennifer Dittrich
Prions are the stuff of nightmares, they are scary and rightly so! - Halil
ah ha: "This species (ie the squid in this study) is a model organism in neuroscience and was used by Andrew Huxley and Alan Hodgkin in their studies on axons." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... I've met Andrew Huxley, he was an interesting guy, very nice bloke. - Halil
Halil
Interstellar technology throws light on spinning black holes -- ScienceDaily - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
Interstellar technology throws light on spinning black holes -- ScienceDaily
The team responsible for the Oscar-nominated visual effects at the centre of Christopher Nolan's epic Interstellar have turned science fiction into science fact by providing new insights into the powerful effects of black holes. - Halil from Bookmarklet
In a paper published today, 13 February, in IOP Publishing's journal Classical and Quantum Gravity, the team describe the innovative computer code that was used to generate the movie's iconic images of the wormhole, black hole and various celestial objects, and explain how the code has led them to new science discoveries. - Halil
as my friend said, "people say watching TV/films rots the brain" lol - Halil
I was just telling David about this yesterday. Have forwarded the link to him. Thanks! - Heleninstitches #teamff
Spidra Webster
Sweet Science: Chocolate Chemistry for Valentine's Day - YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch...
Sweet Science: Chocolate Chemistry for Valentine's Day - YouTube
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"What separates good chocolate from the most exquisite chocolate? Celebrate Valentine’s Day and join Dr. Rich Hartel as he returns to share how tempering, crystallization, and chemistry can make all the difference when selecting your favorite chocolate treat." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
ON THE AIR RIGHT NOW - Spidra Webster
Mark H
Don’t Block the Sun to Cope with Global Warming - http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observa...
Don’t Block the Sun to Cope with Global Warming
"There are two different types of geoengineering [...]: those that block sunlight to counteract global warming, dubbed solar radiation management or albedo modification, and those that remove the molecule behind much of the global warming: CO2. Managing solar radiation has considerable and so far unknown risks. For example, mimicking the cooling effect of volcanoes by spewing sulfuric acid droplets into the stratosphere would be likely to eat away at the ozone layer that protects life on Earth from damaging ultraviolet radiation; it could also lead to more of the air pollution that promotes asthma and early deaths." - Mark H from Bookmarklet
"Another sun-blocking concept—using aerosols to make the clouds that form over the ocean whiter in order to reflect more sunlight back to space—would not harm the ozone hole but could prove difficult in practice or impact global rainfall. Whether or not ships are already doing such marine cloud brightening by spewing aerosols from smokestacks as they travel the oceans is unclear, suggesting at best a limited understanding of the atmospheric and cloud physics involved." - Mark H
"Blocking the sun is, at best, a short-term fix that does nothing to remedy the other impacts of rising levels of atmospheric CO2, such as turning ocean waters more acidic or nights that get warmer and warmer under a thickening blanket of greenhouse gases. Once used, it might also prove difficult to stop hazing the skies or brightening clouds since, without removal of the CO2 causing... more... - Mark H
Halil
Giant rodent the size of a buffalo roamed earth three million years ago - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news...
Giant rodent the size of a buffalo roamed earth three million years ago
Josephoartigasia monesi, which is closely related to modern guinea pigs, is thought to have weighed a metric tonne. Scientists used computer simulation methods to estimate how powerful a bite it had. They came up with a force of around 1,400 Newtons - about the same as that of a tiger's clamping jaws. - Halil from Bookmarklet
I'm glad it is not around anymore! Even the idea gives me shivers down my spine. - grizabella from Android
yeah. Imagine those humongous incisors gnawing your face off. - imabonehead
Didn't orcs used to ride them? - Todd Hoff
Wow, it's 300m long according to one of the illustrations. Makes those 70s beavers seem tiny :) - Eivind
Eivind. - Jenny H. from Android
Yeah, the other image didn't display showing the size comparison, it's huge! - Halil
Yes, boo? :D - Eivind
Halil
Scientists, general public disagree on many key issues - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Scientists, general public disagree on many key issues
I think this is a result of poor dissemination of scientific facts by the scientists involved, sensationalist reporting by the media and lastly a lack of understanding about the science by the general public! Either way, public distrust of scientists and science is never a good thing! Again I bring up this report about governments undermining scientists which doesn't help! > Paul Nurse accuses politicians of 'cowardice' over scientific evidence http://ff.im/1kPDQ0 - Halil from Bookmarklet
"Only 37 percent of the public believes that it is safe to eat GMO products, which 88 percent of the AAAS scientists polled during the study believe that consuming such products is not harmful to a person’s health." - Kevin Johnson
Mark H
Two-Billion-Year-Old Fossils Reveal Strange and Puzzling Forms - http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/artful-...
Two-Billion-Year-Old Fossils Reveal Strange and Puzzling Forms
Two-Billion-Year-Old Fossils Reveal Strange and Puzzling Forms
Show all
"To a human, two billion years is an unfathomable interval. But that, a team of European, Gabonese, and American scientists now say, is how long ago a recently discovered hoard of fossils suggests Earth’s first big life evolved — large enough to see with the naked eye, and in a spectrum of forms that tease and bewilder. What do their shapes mean? Would the life that existed on 2-billion-year-old Earth have given us any clues to the Earth we see today? Just what were these things?" - Mark H from Bookmarklet
"To put the unexpectedness of this fossil cache in perspective, consider that Earth condensed out of the planet-forming gas disk that shrouded our young sun about 4.5 billion years ago. Life evolved surprisingly swiftly after Earth’s birth, probably by 3.5 billion years ago and perhaps more than 4 billion years ago. But the ancestors of the large life forms we see today did not appear... more... - Mark H
"So what might have encouraged this early flirtation with bigness? Immediately prior to their evolution, atmospheric oxygen spiked during the Great Oxygenation Event of 2.3 billion years ago, a result of the invention of photosynthesis by cyanobacteria and the running out of iron deposits with which to sop all the resulting oxygen up by rusting out (the genesis of the famous banded iron... more... - Mark H
Halil
Paul Nurse accuses politicians of 'cowardice' over scientific evidence - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news...
Paul Nurse accuses politicians of 'cowardice' over scientific evidence
Politicians are "cowardly" in their repeated ignorance of scientific evidence that may be unpopular with the public, Sir Paul Nurse has said. The Royal Society president and Nobel Prize-winning geneticist said politicians "must be honest" when disregarding scientists' findings. He also warned "anti-immigration rhetoric" from certain political parties was damaging UK science. He said top scientists from abroad were being put off working in Britain. - Halil from Bookmarklet
This is probably true of most politicians around the world! - Halil
Halil
UK scientists develop AUV imaging technology to assess seabed ecology - http://www.oilandgastechnology.net/health-...
UK scientists develop AUV imaging technology to assess seabed ecology
By using a camera on the Autosub6000 AUV to take a continuous stream of high resolution photographs of life on the sea floor, this new method revealed a tenfold increase in the precision of deepsea ecosystem diversity estimates relative to the use of scientific trawling. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Dr Kirsty Morris, the lead author of this research, published in Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, said: “This is an important step towards the automated imaging of the deep sea, which is essential for understanding the complexity of seafloor biodiversity and its future management” - Halil
This research showed that anemones were the most abundant animal on the sea floor, information that has been previously missed from trawling because they became damaged in the nets and rendered unrecognisable. - Halil
Spidra Webster
Proof that female ejaculation is just pee. - Seriously, Science? - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/serious...
Proof that female ejaculation is just pee. - Seriously, Science?
"Up until now, the scientific literature was pretty much as divided as the internet on whether the large amount of fluid emitted from women upon orgasm represents “real” female ejaculate, or whether it is simply urine (there is a remarkably large body of literature on this topic, both scientific and trashy, and everywhere in between). Previous experiments have focused on determining the liquid’s chemical makeup, finding it to be chemically identical to urine, but these studies ignored the physical source of the copious fluid. Here, the researchers take it one step further by performing ultrasounds before and after ejaculation, as well as testing the biochemical properties of the liquid. It turns out that not only is it chemically identical to urine, but the bladder empties during the period of ejaculation coinciding with orgasm. So there you have it: it’s probably just pee after all! Nature and Origin of “Squirting” in Female Sexuality. “INTRODUCTION: During sexual stimulation, some... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
I wonder just how much this research cost? And I highly doubt scientific curiosity was the motive! - Halil
Golden showers for everyone! Also, ew. - Jenny H. from Android
Spidra Webster
"Long before humans touched the shores of the Hawaiian Islands, Maui’s dry central plains were a riot of native loulu palms and a‘ali‘i shrubs. Where sugarcane and suburbs stand today, giant flightless birds foraged, unaware of their impending extinction. A major component of that ancient forest is now missing, known only from pollen records. Botanists couldn’t decipher what this presumably extinct plant was, but soil samples showed that it once dominated Hawai‘i’s lowland forests. In 1992, Ken Wood, a botanist with the National Tropical Botanical Garden, was surveying Kaho‘olawe. Ravaged in the past by feral goats, sheep, wildfires, and military bombing, the uninhabited island had been reduced to lifeless hardpan—not exactly fertile soil for solving a plant mystery. Nevertheless, that’s what happened. Wood rappelled down Kaho‘olawe’s southern cliffs and clambered across some rocks to explore ‘Ale‘ale, a tiny sea stack just offshore. He found an intact shrubland with native plants... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
"TIMETREE is a public resource for knowledge on the timescale and evolutionary history of life. Search the database below or go to the TIMETREE OF LIFE for other resources." - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Spidra Webster
Taxpayers spend $140 billion funding science each year — but can't access many of the results - Vox - http://www.vox.com/2015...
"The British commentator George Monbiot once compared academic publishers to the media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, concluding that the former were more predatory. "The knowledge monopoly is as unwarranted and anachronistic as the corn laws," he wrote. "Let's throw off these parasitic overlords and liberate the research that belongs to us." Despite a decades-old "open access" movement — to have all research findings in the public domain and not languishing behind paywalls — the traditional approach to publishing remains firmly in place. Taxpayers fund a lot of the science that gets done, academics (many of whom are also funded by public money) peer review it for free, and then journals charge users (again, many of whom paid for the science in the first place!) ludicrous sums of money to view the finished product. American universities and government groups spend $10-billion each year to access the science. That's ten billion dollars to buy back content we have often already paid for in the... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
This sort of thing makes me furious. - Spidra Webster
Spidra Webster
Men (on the Internet) don’t believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence - The Washington Post - http://www.washingtonpost.com/news...
Men (on the Internet) don’t believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence - The Washington Post
"As a follow-up to recent studies on sexism and harassment in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), researchers studied the Internet's reaction to the evidence those studies provided — and it turned out the way you'd expect, if you've ever been on the Internet. Male commenters flipped out. The new study's results were published Thursday in the journal Psychology of Women Quarterly. To see how different genders reacted to evidence of bias in science (on the Internet, anyway), the researchers looked at the comment threads of three articles about studies on the issue, and quantified the responses. Several scientific studies have shown that a gender gap exists in science, technology, engineering and math fields, with women losing out all the way up and down the pipeline of academia and industry. In 2012, researchers from Yale published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that indicated unconscious gender biases in hiring processes for women in... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
Halil
Brushing your teeth with the remains of dead stars - Space News - http://www.redorbit.com/news...
Brushing your teeth with the remains of dead stars - Space News
the element fluorine (which, through gaining an electron, becomes fluoride) is found in products such as toothpaste and chewing gum, but its origins have long been somewhat of a mystery. There have been three preeminent theories about how the chemical element was created, and the findings of the new study support the one which claims that it was formed in giant red stars at the end of their life cycles. Our sun and planets were made from materials from these dead stars, and likewise, the fluorine in our toothpaste might have been created from the sun’s ancestors. - Halil from Bookmarklet
Well, we are created from dead stars too. - Joe
Spidra Webster
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2011...&
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com
Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard) - NYTimes.com
"LAST FALL, President Obama threw what was billed as the first White House Science Fair, a photo op in the gilt-mirrored State Dining Room. He tested a steering wheel designed by middle schoolers to detect distracted driving and peeked inside a robot that plays soccer. It was meant as an inspirational moment: children, science is fun; work harder. Politicians and educators have been wringing their hands for years over test scores showing American students falling behind their counterparts in Slovenia and Singapore. How will the United States stack up against global rivals in innovation? The president and industry groups have called on colleges to graduate 10,000 more engineers a year and 100,000 new teachers with majors in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math. All the Sputnik-like urgency has put classrooms from kindergarten through 12th grade — the pipeline, as they call it — under a microscope. And there are encouraging signs, with surveys showing the number of college... more... - Spidra Webster from Bookmarklet
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