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Jason Bobe
Video games played with live organisms : Nature Biotechnology : Nature Publishing Group - http://www.nature.com/nbt...
"'Biotic games' that mimic classic video games have been devised by Ingmar Riedel-Kruse and his team at Stanford. Single-celled organisms are placed in a microfluidics chamber with a microscope camera to track their movements. The image is overlaid on a game board. In PAC-mecium (pictured) the player guides paramecia up and down by changing the chamber's electrical field with a joystick. Paramecia gain points for gobbling yeast cells, and avoiding a computer-animated fish. There's Biotic Pinball, POND PONG and Ciliaball. Riedel-Kruse hopes these biotech games could become part of biology studies and contribute to crowd-sourcing and research. http://news.stanford.edu/news..." - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
Scientists Create Real-Life Pac-Man Using Microorganisms - http://gizmodo.com/5735823...
Scientists Create Real-Life Pac-Man Using Microorganisms
"Scientists Create Real-Life Pac-Man Using Microorganisms Scientists have remade Pac-Man using paramecia—microorganisms that you can control with a real joystick while a digital microscope relays images to a computer screen. They call it "Pac-Mecium" and it is not the only game they are playing. The user control the paramecium by just moving the joystick, which is connected to a controller that "controls the polarity of a mild electrical field applied across the fluid chamber, which influences the direction the paramecia move." I wonder how they make Pac-Mecium turn into super-Pac-Mecium. And who is chasing the poor Pac-Mecium, anyway? Evil amoebas? I sure hope so. The biotic game was created by a team lead by Stanford University Bioengineering professor Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, who thinks his games will increase awareness on these organisms and how science is going to affect the behavior of animals, human included. They also created versions of other classic games, like "POND PONG", "Ciliaball" and "Biotic Pinball." In the latter one, the paramecia are in charge of rolling the ball around the board." - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
EteRNA, an Online Game, Helps Build a New RNA Warehouse - NYTimes.com - http://www.nytimes.com/2011...
"The scientists hope to uncover fundamental principles underlying one of life’s building blocks, and they believe that the free game will also serve as a training ground for a cadre of citizen-experts who will help generate a new storehouse of biological knowledge. The process may also aid researchers in building more powerful automated algorithms for biological discovery. The game, EteRNA, is accessible at eterna.cmu.edu/content/EteRNA. It allows non-biologists to design complex new ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, as well as to receive quick feedback on the biological function of their designs. In a way, EteRNA is a successor to Foldit, a popular Internet-based video game that proved that the pattern matching skills of amateurs could outperform some of the best protein-folding algorithms designed by scientists. Designed by some of the same researchers as Foldit, EteRNA is similar in that it is basically a two-dimensional puzzle-solving exercise performed in this case with the four... more... - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
EteRNA | Played by Humans, Scored by Nature. - http://eterna.cmu.edu/content...
wow - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
Jason Bobe
"You must navigate a nanobot through a 3D environment of blood vessels and connective tissue in an attempt to save an ailing patient by retraining her non-functional immune cells. Along the way, you will learn about the biological processes that enable macrophages and neutrophils – white blood cells – to detect and fight infections." - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
FORA.tv - Adam Walden: The Evolution of Gaming - http://fora.tv/2010...
FORA.tv - Adam Walden: The Evolution of Gaming
"L2: Generation Next Forum 2010 Adam Walden: The Evolution of Gaming" - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
"When Games Invade Real Life Alexandra Carmichael What happens when self-tracking and games are pervasive? Jesse Schell, author of The Art of Game Design and instructor at Carnegie Mellon University, gave a shocking talk at the 2010 Dice Summit. With dark enthusiasm, he explored the question: if passive sensors become ubiquitous in the world around us, will everyday life turn into a game?" - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
"Killer Flu!! Or, maybe, “non-killer flu” to describe the current outbreak of swine flu! Here is a game that allows you to learn more about how the influenza virus is transmitted and how it changes every year - which explains why you can get more than one dose of the flu over your lifetime and why vaccines need changing every year. We also hope it will be a bit of fun. The second level of the game is an opportunity to understand why pandemic flu is a bit different to normal yearly (seasonal) flu. Remember: even pandemic flu generally kills fewer people than you would think. Try to kill too many people in the game and see how difficult it is!" - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
Jason Bobe
"Build a cell, fight off viruses, survive harsh worlds, and save the Platypus species! This game was made possible by a grant from the Digital Media & Learning Competition. The goal was to make a truly educational game that was also genuinely fun to play. We hope students, teachers, and gamers will all enjoy the game, and encourage you to visit www.cellcraftgame.com" - Jason Bobe from Bookmarklet
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