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Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"A couple of points: Offline payment by phone is great - if the terminals are there to read it. But I believe that of the 16 million point of sale credit card readers in the US, only 280,000 or so are NFC-enabled. That's less than 2%. My fundamental point remains: that there are more and more kinds of transactions in which payment by stored memory of your credentials will trump payment by an explicit act of payment. It has been the gold standard in online payments for some time. It will become the gold standard in offline payments as well. I do hear all of those who are making the point that Apple Pay is intrinsically more secure. But at least in the US, where your credit card losses are limited, I suspect that security will never be a key driver of adoption." - Tim O'Reilly
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Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I suspect that that won't be compelling enough for a lot of people. Look at the history of online privacy. But let's not argue about this. Time will tell. I am not trying to predict the future, just to share lines of thinking that may help to identify trends. I'm very Bayesian in my approach. I look at the future probabalistically. I truly believe that a lot of different futures *can* happen. But as events unfold, I update my priors, and some futures seem more or less likely. But being open to seeing alternate futures than the consensus reality seems like a useful skill. It's served me well so far." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"Yes, but unless I'm misunderstanding things, Apple Pay might defeat the whole convenience appeal of Uber and Cover. Because there is no retained information, except in your phone, can the app automatically charge you at the conclusion of the consumption event? Or does it require the finger touch at the moment of purchase? (I guess if you authorize when you start the transaction - e.g. when you call the Uber or make the restaurant reservation - that might work.)" - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"Yeah, I hear you. But the point of my article wasn't about the security or lack thereof of Apple Pay. It was with the "argument for convenience" that appears as the first brand promise on the Apple website. Even after all this great debate, I believe that the real UI win is with interfaces that make payment part of the act of consumption, a la Uber (or even Amazon, where the "order" implicitly includes payment rather than treating it as a separate step.) I do get that if there are enough credit card security breaches that the improved security will be a trump feature, but I suspect that (especially in the US, where individuals aren't responsible for fraud on their cards) that the convenience of "I recognize you by what you did" interfaces will become increasingly common. And because these approaches rely on stored data, the improved per-transaction security of Apple Pay may not matter. E.g. even if, as someone suggested, Uber supports Apple Pay, I suspect that, for repeat customers,..." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"You make a good point, that Apple Pay could actually accelerate the trend that I am articulating, namely that payment will become an integrated part of the act of consumption or purchase, rather than a separate step." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I think you miss my point. In app - but what does the app do, and should payment be a separate step?" - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"Your "card present" point makes a lot of sense. If indeed it provides lower transaction costs, that could be a big advantage." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I think that's a reasonable tradeoff, frankly. How many services do I set up that require a credit card once? A few dozen a year? How many transactions do I make in a year with a credit card today? A few dozen a week? Sure, Apple Pay might be nice for setting up a stored credential, and more secure than having it remembered by my browser, but I guarantee you paying every time is less convenient than setting up a stored credential that is charged, Uber-style, simply as a result of using the service, with no explicit payment step, or where (a la Amazon 1-click, or iTunes (which licensed 1-click), where the act of purchase (e.g. download or shipping request) and the act of payment are the same." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I'm sure they will, for the one-time payment registration. It doesn't change my point that ultimately, merchants and app developers should be aiming along the Uber curve of automatic payment triggered by use of the service itself. Wait and see. You will see many more apps that have no explicit payment step." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I don't think it's different. Apple is exactly equivalent to Uber, in that they took your credit card once, and then use that to provide an ongoing service. In the case of Uber, that service is letting you hire a car. In the case of Apple, that service is letting you make a variety of sales transactions. But in each case, there is a single party that holds your credit card info, and passes it to the bank for payment at the end of the transaction. See http://news.investors.com/tech... "Users of the Apple iPhone and Watch can use the credit cards that they have on file in their iTunes accounts and add them to the Passbook app on their devices to activate Apple Pay. Apple Pay can then be used at any participating store." So Apple has given you half of the Uber experience: that is, register the card once, use it many times. But it hasn't given you the other half, because you still have to take an explicit payment step at the end of each transaction. The key to Uber is that they recognize..." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I will lay odds that most people will use the card info they already have stored. But we will see. In a lot of ways, what I wrote wasn't really about Apple Pay. It was about what happens when you really ask yourself, "Why is payment a separate step here at all?" If more apps take the Uber approach, then payment as an act gets handled automatically in the background. It's not offered at the time as part of the transaction. It's part of what the app knows about you, and is processed on the back end." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"That does make this a lot better." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I totally agree. My point is to highlight the long term trend towards sensor data in context as a kind of unique authentication, rather than the hardware approach Apple has taken." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"Right. But: a) This assumes that everyone is using an iphone, and that every merchant installs the hardware required to take the payment. A lot of uphill network effects there. b) Apple itself holds the credit card info. So yes, this reduces the number of opportunities for intrusion. But this isn't really different from Uber, say, telling us that the driver never sees your credit card info, or Cover saying that the restaurant never sees it. The point is that there are numerous opportunities to reduce the surface area of exposure at the app level, not just in special hardware. But the main point I'm making is not that Apple Pay is a bad idea. It's a step forward. But it seems to me that examples like Uber highlight an alternate way of validating payment that uses context rather than some special hardware to avoid some of the inconveniences and security weaknesses of credit cards." - Tim O'Reilly
What Amazon, iTunes, and Uber teach us about Apple Pay - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
Re: The Creep Factor: How to Think About Big Data and Privacy - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"John, I think you're totally right that people saying "yes" to apps requests to share their location data is a blank check for companies to do anything they want with that data. But people do say "yes," so what to do? I am arguing that what we want to do is to figure out specific harms that we want to prohibit or penalize, precisely because people will say "yes" so thoughtlessly, and because once that permission is given, it is very difficult to tell just what data companies have or how they are using it. Auditing "data harm" is difficult, but not more difficult than, say, Google managing search quality or combating search spam. It's a good use case for what I've called "algorithmic regulation."" - Tim O'Reilly
Re: Does net neutrality really matter? - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"My point exactly. Why should comcast et al get paid twice for the same service, once by consumers and the second time by internet data suppliers?" - Tim O'Reilly
Re: Self-directed learning, and O’Reilly’s role in the ConnectED program - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"It really makes me happy to see authors like you and Matthew supporting the initiative!" - Tim O'Reilly
Re: Writing without knowing - http://programming.oreilly.com/2014...
"I totally love what you say here, Simon, and it completely agrees with my own experience. I did all of my best technical writing about subjects that I was learning, not on subjects that I had long ago mastered. We definitely have great O'Reilly books by masters, but you're right that new learners actually often have a better sense of what people need to know, and in what order, than the masters." - Tim O'Reilly
Re: The Creep Factor: How to Think About Big Data and Privacy - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"Another really provocative take on the political issues around big data comes from David Eaves, the Canadian open government activist. He writes about a different kind of data redlining: the data that isn't collected in order to affect the operations of government. http://www.slate.com/articles/... He points out, for example, that North Carolina has legislated what kind of climate data can be used to predict sea level rise. And he points out the role of the US census in shaping everything from congressional seats to budgeting: "As accessibility becomes less politicized, how governments collect data will become the new political battlefield. The most relevant “open” U.S. government data set may be the census. The grand history of disputes over its seemingly benign numbers—what questions to ask, what methodologies to use, what to do about the information—is emblematic of the bickering on the horizon. The census is so contentious because the stakes are so high: Its results determine seat..." - Tim O'Reilly
Software Above the Level of a Single Device - http://www.slideshare.net/timorei...
Software Above the Level of a Single Device
DevOps: Getting the People Part Right - http://www.slideshare.net/timorei...
By People, For People
Re: Does net neutrality really matter? - http://radar.oreilly.com/2014...
"I totally agree. I think that reframing the argument in terms of economics would get a lot more attention from regulators. This should probably be an FTC issue, not (or not just) an FCC one. The cable companies sell one thing, and deliver another." - Tim O'Reilly
Government For The People, By The People, In the 21st Century - http://www.slideshare.net/timorei...
Government For The People, By The People, In the 21st Century
These are the top 20 investors to follow on Twitter? Really? - http://radar.oreilly.com/2013...
Hey Nice blog.. - Roman Rage
its nice meeting you here. i like to be your friend. please contact me through my email address abigailarok26@hotmail.com - Abigail
"I hear you, Joe. But we've continued to do those things even as we have become more disciplined. There is no question, though, that a lot of our success did indeed come from our ignorance of "how things are done." But I believe it's possible to have a deep connection to your values and mission while still running a tight ship. The pathology you describe is common - putting growth or profit before all else - but I can assure you that O'Reilly is a long way off from that being a problem. We are still dreamers who want to make a better world. We just know that we can do that more effectively if we do our dreaming in a disciplined way." - Tim O'Reilly
Technology and Trust: The Challenge of 21st Century Government - http://www.slideshare.net/timorei...
Technology and Trust: The Challenge of 21st Century Government
The Real Ebook Revolution is Just Beginning (pdf with notes) - http://www.slideshare.net/timorei...
The Real Ebook Revolution is Just Beginning (pdf with notes)
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