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Daniel W. Crompton › Comments

Daniel W. Crompton
Woodblock Carving out higher education together It's going to be fun! - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Woodblock Carving out higher education together It's going to be fun! Faculty of Oplerno have expressed an interest in creating certificate and degree programs. The time has come for us all to get together! - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Transparency with Video Recently we decided to do something some might consider insane or revolutionary... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Transparency with Video Recently we decided to do something some might consider insane or revolutionary: we started to broadcast our team meetings. We — Oplerno — are an education startup, which means that we heavily rely on both educators and people who want educatio… - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Creative Destruction Original Post from Oplerno: Creative destruction A cost crisis, changing labour markets and new technology will turn an old institution on its head Interesting article which makes some valid points, though some of the 'facts' about MOOCs are largely based on conjecture. There is little hard evidence that MOOCs […] have so far failed to live up to their promise. Largely because there is no formal system of accreditation, … From the research I, +Daniël Crompton, did - comparing MOOCs to other online education offerings - this is merely one of the contributing factors. IMHO the primary factor to the failure of MOOCs is that they are massive. Recent research, highlighted in the NYT, showed that the introduction courses - the ones with 300-400 students - suffer from the same or similar problems. Once they took some of the poorest performers out of the lecture halls and put them in classes of ~30 they performed as good, if not better, than the students in the large... - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Bring on the workplace revolution! This is a guest post I wrote some time ago for TEDx Amsterdam, I... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Bring on the workplace revolution! This is a guest post I wrote some time ago for TEDx Amsterdam, I recently updated an revised it a little. If there is one thing that TED has taught me is that change is good; however, not all change is always good for everybody. Take the issue of employee tenure, in simpler words, keeping employees in your company. It is tricky: change for the employee is probably good, an opportunity for growth. Change for the employer is often good too, as an employer, you’d prefer not to have somebody working for you who doesn’t want to be there. And there’s the crux. How can companies entice their people to stay? The Lean Startup methodology establishes that we need to look at where the pain is for customers and focus on solving that pain. In this case, the pain of employers is a result of the pain that the employee feels, a combination of lack of job satisfaction and growth potential. This can be as a result of a number of factors, but one jumps out of the... - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Reshared post from European Commission: - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
The Erasmus InitiativeThe Erasmus initiative is renowned for the opportunities it provides students to learn abroad, as well as the opportunities it provides for teaching staff in higher education. Original Post from European Commission: In the field of education and training, the Erasmus initiative is renowned for the opportunities it provides students to learn abroad, as well as the opportunities it provides for teaching staff in higher education. Building on these, the Erasmus+ programme now covers five major areas of education and training: 1/School education opportunities for staff and institutions; 2/Vocational education and training opportunities for students, apprentices, trainees, staff, institutions, and business; 3/Higher Education opportunities for students, staff, institutions, and businesses; 4/Adult Education opportunities for staff, institutions, and businesses; 5/European Integration opportunities for academic and research staff and institutions. We have a dedicated... - Daniel W. Crompton
Louis Gray
Matthew and Sarah turn six today! Happy birthday twinners!
IMG_104245106126825.jpeg
Awww! Happy birthdays! - Stephen Mack
Happy birthday! - Anne Bouey
Happy birthday to the twins! - Mary B: #TeamMonique
Wait...what?! Weren't they just born not that long ago? - April Russo
Yay! Congrats. - Daniel W. Crompton
@April, they were born just yesteryear... - Daniel W. Crompton
Six years and one day ago. - Louis Gray
How time flies! Happy belateds :) - WoH: Professor MOTHRA
Belated happy birthday! - Stephan Planken from iPhone
A belated Happy Birthday to Sarah and Matthew! - vicster: full-bodied
Daniel W. Crompton
Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care Interesting... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care Interesting read... Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care. - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care Exactly the... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care Exactly the problem we are trying to solve with +Oplerno... Teaching college is no longer a middle-class job, and everyone paying tuition should care. - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Gillmor Gang If you missed it, watch Gillmor turns out to be right. Right  +Robert Scoble ? ;) - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Gillmor Gang If you missed it, watch Gillmor turns out to be right. Right  +Robert Scoble ? ;) Steve Gillmor hosts weekly tech show, The Gillmor Gang, a roundtable conversation with Silicon Valley notables and various experts in the world of technology. - Daniel W. Crompton
Holly's favorite Anna
"This capacity responds to fans’ skepticism at the Tamarian’s technological prowess. The Children of Tama would not be delayed by their inability to speak directly because they seem to have no need whatsoever for explicit, low-level discourse like instructions and requests." -- BULLLLLLLLLLLSHIT - Andrew C (✔)
And again, it never explains how the Tamarian children learn these stories and myths. Surely adults don't just chant "Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra" until the kids suddenly get it. - Andrew C (✔)
And what do you say when you're figuring out what to have for lunch, esp if no shared cultural story has a hero who wanted, say, a burrito? "Darmok at the food court... but not what he had?" - Andrew C (✔)
There are few things in geek culture that make me more annoyed than this episode of TNG. Sorry. - Andrew C (✔)
yah, but it's fun to appropriate. - Big Joe Silence
The concepts are interesting, but the reality and execution get tricky. Symbolic spoken language might work if there was also a telepathic communication that could convey the details/complexity with the words as a short-hand. - Holly's favorite Anna
But if you could communicate details telepathically, why would you need spoken language at all? That'd be like how I've wished I could teleport so I wouldn't be late for the bus. - Andrew C (✔)
Even though it doesn't really work with Tamarian as portrayed in TNG, I still find the idea of the Universal Translator translating every morpheme in a brain dead fashion highly amusing. Like, imagine if the Tamarians spoke a highly-appropriative language like Modern English, and the UT just decided to literally translate all the Greek and Latin and Celtic and Anglo-Saxon and Norman French morphemes without any regard to cultural or historical context whatsoever. - Victor Ganata
Although, to be honest, the more I think about it, the more it doesn't really seem that far of a stretch where the majority of verbal communication involves quoting lines from movies and memes. This is already kind of how me and my brother communicate. :D Of course, it doesn't account for the lack of less context-dependent forms of communication, but it's still amusing. - Victor Ganata
I used to speak with friends in long strings of Simpsons quotes. I get communicating by reference and allegory, but I also got that _not everyone got those references_. The bootstrapping problem that the Tamarian captain has with Picard is exactly the same problem Tamarian children would have and illustrates exactly what's idiotic about the entire premise. - Andrew C (✔)
What if you were connected to the Internet before you were even verbal, and you're been bombarded 24/7 by memes for years and years? I guess we'll eventually find out! :D - Victor Ganata
I mean, sure, the execution of the idea wasn't that great, but I actually don't think the premise of a highly-context dependent language that isn't easily translatable by a machine is far-fetched. All it would take from a ST canon perspective is to say Kirk's description of the UT as a telepathy device is totally wrong. Then it would be easy to say the translation algorithm just screwed up royally. #DamnYouUniversalTranslator - Victor Ganata
Seriously, what's a starship captain gonna know about linguistics and how to program machine language translation algorithms, anyway? And if you really had a telepathy device, why would you only use it to translate languages and not invade people's minds when you're in dangerous situations? - Victor Ganata
"I actually don't think the premise of a highly-context dependent language that isn't easily translatable by a machine is far-fetched." -- except in a universe where the UT otherwise has never failed. - Andrew C (✔)
That said, there's a great moment in Y The Last Man, I think, where someone upbraids Yorick for using the "crossed the Rubicon" phrase without really knowing what it means... but since we're not as dumb as the Tamarians, when we use a phrase and listeners don't know what it means, we don't merely repeat it over and over hoping for enlightenment by repetition. - Andrew C (✔)
If you accept the premise that Kirk's explanation for how the UT works is crap (kind of like how I think Morpheus's explanation for why the machines enslaved the humans is crap), then there's no reason to assume that the UT is infallible. For all we know, there are billions of instances when it failed, but the writers just never touched the topic except for this episode. - Victor Ganata
"If you accept the premise that Kirk's explanation for how the UT works is crap" -- that way lies fanfiction! Beware! - Andrew C (✔)
That's actually the only time that they ever try to explain the UT, though (well, unless they do it in the episodes of Enterprise that I haven't watched yet.) And, again, there's good reason to doubt Kirk's grasp of the actual technology. - Victor Ganata
Still, would even Kirk have the stones to bullshit Zefram Cochrane? - Andrew C (✔)
Kirk probably believed that that's how it really works. Still doesn't mean it's how it actually works, though. - Victor Ganata
Especially after watching Enterprise, I'm more inclined to believe it's just a far more sophisticated version of the pre-Federation UT, to be honest. - Victor Ganata
But leaving aside whether a very-highly-context dependent language would actually work that way and ignoring whether the UT would actually fail in that manner, the episode and the article does tread the well-worn ground of semiotics. Words ultimately only represent reality indirectly—the connection between words and reality is quite tenuous at best. Words more directly represent words... more... - Victor Ganata
The part that kills it for me is that they clearly have normal non-metaphorical words, such as "fist" and "walls" and "sail" -- and they understand the difference between "open" and "closed." So it is simply untrue that they only speak in metaphor. They must speak a non-metaphorical version of their language as well. - Stephen Mack from iPhone
Andrew, when the geeks brought up the 'Darmok' episode. {shakes fist} - Andrew C (✔) from Android
I think it's possible that the individual words don't have much conscious meaning the same way we rarely think of the meanings of individual morphemes and only consciously think about words, though. - Victor Ganata
I enjoyed the episode because I didn't think this hard about it. - Amit Patel
Sort of related: I just remembered a book I read and enjoyed a few years ago, The Guild of Xenolinguists. It's a series of short stories by Sheila Finch. http://www.amazon.com/The-Gui... - Betsy
Thinking out loud: What if Tamarians have two levels of language. As children, they speak one level that is closer to ours, and that's how they learn the stories and "open" and "closed." As adults, they transition to the allegorical/metaphorical/whateverical language. Maybe the first language, let's call it FirstSpeak, is used by and to children, and also at home with family, but rarely... more... - Betsy
"I enjoyed the episode because I didn't think this hard about it." - it's not like I was striving to dislike this episode. The basic bootstrapping problem occurred to me while watching it for the first time. - Andrew C (✔) from Android
[Still thinking out loud]. With the addition of servant caste to my theory, maybe FirstSpeak doesn't apply to family anymore. Maybe FirstSpeak is only used by/to children and by/to the servant caste, further emphasizing the difference between servant caste and ruling caste. And I'm stopping now.] - Betsy
And doesn't Picard teach the Tamarian captain an Earth story? That would mean the foundations of the Tamarian "language" aren't transmitted via DNA nor telepathy. - Andrew C (✔) from Android
There's really no indication that the Tamarian captain understood Picard's summary of the Epic of Gilgamesh, though. - Victor Ganata
The more I think about it, the more it seems that having an entire cultural database pumped into your brain before you're even verbal isn't really that far-fetched. - Victor Ganata
Oh! I just remembered an Ursula K. Le Guin short story that totally does the bootstrapping thing, though. Only children speak. The adults only communicate non-verbally. - Victor Ganata
It's called "The Silence of the Asonu" http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction... - Victor Ganata
I'm now imagining a scenario where the highly abstract, very culturally context dependent dialect they speak is the formal dialect of their culture. Everyone first learns to speak some low-prestige dialect but if they want to get ahead in their society (like being able to pilot a starship) you have to only use the formal dialect. It could really just be an extreme form of code switching enforced by dialect discrimination http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki... - Victor Ganata
I don't think the bootstrapping thing is as bad as you expect. Imagine a child learning the word "Laughter" or "Laughing". You wait for an appropriate moment where the child is laughing, and then you introduce the word. Imagine instead that you introduce the phrase "Steve, when the comments were read" The child learns the same association. I can also see that the child might actually... more... - Steve and 4 other people
"you have to only use the formal dialect" - but it would be asinine to think that foreigners necessarily know and use your formal dialect. The Tamarian captain was clearly exasperated, but he didn't resort to the non-allegory language, and that's more likely because he didn't have one than because using it would be declassé. - Andrew C (✔)
Look, there is no "Simpsons-ese" where people *only* communicate in Simpsons references, and believe me, I've tried. - Andrew C (✔)
Why would we assume that aliens would understand, say, AAVE or Cockney or pidgin, better than General American or RP? I mean, I can't really imagine that the first thing a starship captain would try if the aliens didn't get General American is start speaking to them in a dialect that doesn't have as much prestige. - Victor Ganata
I guess I'm trying to look at it more abstractly, though. The execution wasn't that great, but I'm reimagining the premise as one where we have a language that the UT can only translate very literally and not idiomatically. If you ignore the specifics (like the Tamarians apparently do :D ) it doesn't seem like such a preposterous idea to me. - Victor Ganata
I mean, if you think too hard about language, it becomes apparent that all language—even individual words, individual morphemes—are really just analogies and abstractions of reality. I actually think that the writers got that part right, at least. - Victor Ganata
"in a dialect that doesn't have as much prestige" -- I would assume that if they didn't get General American at all that they might instead start from the building blocks of language, the way we generally teach language these days. We don't just say things louder and slower. The Tamarian captain's plan was literally to just repeat himself until it worked. There's no way they developed advanced technology if one of their starship captains was that dumb. - Andrew C (✔)
That's why they went with gestures, and that didn't go so well either. - Victor Ganata
I mean, what do you mean by "building blocks of language" though? You learn semiotics well before you're verbal. We don't teach kids what words mean by going through their etymologies. - Victor Ganata
Now that I think about it, how would you even teach someone what "failure" or "agreement" meant devoid of any experential context? - Victor Ganata
I love this episode! And this discussion! - Daniel W. Crompton
"I mean, what do you mean by "building blocks of language" though? " grammar and meaning, I guess. Like Stephen said earlier, they know individual words like "fist" and "open". The building blocks of their language are the stories they have to tell each other, and those stories themselves, at some level, cannot be endless allegories to something else. They don't say anything like "Jell and Kevarr at Dan" to mean "Darmok and Jelad at Tenagra" because, like, ... why? - Andrew C (✔)
But that's what language is! Endless allegories and analogies to something else! You only need to look at etymologies to know its true. - Victor Ganata
Meaning is elusive. - Victor Ganata
This is one of my favorite episodes. That is all. - Friar Will
You don't consciously learn syntax and grammar, though, at least not until you start formal education. Much of that ends up in place long before you're actually verbal. So it's not that difficult for me to imagine that, if the Tamarians also never thought to bring a linguist along, it would be nearly impossible to get to that very basic but also mostly instinctual level of instruction across a massive cultural divide that we can't even really imagine. - Victor Ganata
I still like the analogy where their individual words correspond to our individual morphemes. While they do carry some semantic meaning, they're hard to pin down without surrounding context. The word "walls" in "Shaka when the walls fell" probably has the same status as "-struct-" does in a word like "deconstruction." Knowing that "-struct-" is derived from Latin "to build" doesn't... more... - Victor Ganata
Like analyzing the morphemic elements in "deconstruction" (de- sense of undoing, -con- "together", -struct- "to build", -ion morpheme that nouns verbs) totally doesn't tell you what "deconstruction" means. - Victor Ganata
"You need to know the history of Western Civ leading up to Postmodernism to really appreciate what it means. " -- and by analogy, the Tamarians would... share their stories! not repeat "deconstruction" over and over, which is essentially what the Tamarian captain actually did. - Andrew C (✔)
Like I said, how to you explain "agreement" when you can't be sure that the other person has any idea of how your culture and society is supposed to work? I can't imagine how you would convey that with gestures alone. - Victor Ganata
The "allegories and analogies to something else" is where this concept totally fails in the episode, because the Tamarians apparently cannot grasp that there /is/ a "something else" at all; they make references without even the concept that anyone could not know those references. Which I maintain is pretty much as impossible as the language Douglas Hofstadter proposed (as a thought... more... - Andrew C (✔)
Just thinking about the ST prime universe, we kind of cheated with even getting a universal translator up and running. The very first sapient species we met were telepaths with similar biology (owing to the Ancients). Without the Vulcans and their existing knowledge base, and without the shared neurobiology with a lot of the sapient species in the Alpha Quadrant (the Klingons and the Cardassians were also descendants of the Ancients), I wonder how impossible trying to grok xenolinguistics would've been. - Victor Ganata
But what is that "something else" though? I suppose one could argue that nouns and verbs most closely correlate to experience in reality, but even then, they're ultimately idealized abstractions that rely mainly on shared experience and shared culture/society to have any useful meaning. - Victor Ganata
Yes, but there are some foundational words rooted in reality or pre-verbal experiences (eating, for example), which is how we bootstrap. The Tamarian language has an immense bootstrapping problem. - Andrew C (✔)
Conversely, if the allegories of Tamarian-ese map so well to words and phrases, then the UT shouldn't have failed. - Andrew C (✔)
But you can't really bootstrap an entire language on base concepts like that. Otherwise learning other terrestrial languages would be totally trivial. - Victor Ganata
Yeah, but we're having this discussion ignoring the alleged infallibility of the UT. I think we can all agree that if Kirk's explanation for how it works is right, then there's no way this episode makes any sense. - Victor Ganata
Even ignoring Kirk's explanation, though, the established function of the UT has been that it has basically always worked, or at least never failed to the extent that it did with the Tamarian language. - Andrew C (✔)
I have to wonder, though, how one could possibly go about explaining the history of Western Civilization leading up to Postmodernism if you don't share a common language or a common culture :D I don't see how you could start from basic concepts of eating and sleeping. At best, it would take a *really* *really* long time. - Victor Ganata
Absence of evidence of failure is not evidence of absence of failure ;) - Victor Ganata
Actually, while there weren't any episodes depicting total failure of the UT except for this one, there were apparently a couple of DS9 episodes where the UT wasn't perfect http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki... - Victor Ganata
The UT facilitated translation to the nanites!!! By any measure they're more foreign than the Tamarians. Edit: two fucking seasons before "Darmok"!!!!! - Andrew C (✔)
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: Fantastically Wrong: mandrake - http://www.wired.com?p=987191...
"Clear, thanks!" - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Original Post from Oplerno: Coming Soon: Introduction to Existentialism #philosophy This is a 12-week online course designed to introduce students to key themes, concepts, thinkers, and texts of Existentialist Philosophy and Literature. The online course learning environment includes lecture videos, lesson pages, a glossary, handouts, study questions, and pages of links to useful material. Students work and learn individually and collaboratively through discussion forums, videoconferences with the professor, online quizzes, and writing assignments. Many of the texts used in the course can be found online, but links are also provided for students who desire to purchase texts. By Professor Gregory Sadler (+GregoryBSadler) https://enroll.oplerno.com/courses... http://static.ow.ly/photos... - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Enforceable TLS policies on known-good email domains - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Hey! Thanks for the invite to the community! I'm the guy in charge of tech at +Oplerno. I'd give you... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Hey! Thanks for the invite to the community! I'm the guy in charge of tech at +Oplerno. I'd give you the whole spiel, but I'm sure you don't want a marketing pitch. Simply put Oplerno is an affordable platform for university education approved to give course credit, which could be transferred to your own institute. - Daniel W. Crompton
Louis Gray
Confession: I still visit FriendFeed about 5x more than Facebook. Maybe 10x.
But Google+ is where your heart is, yes? - Mark H
Google- - Maurizio
Me too! - Farzad
*sleeps on LG's shoulder* - Big Fat Yeast Roll! from Android
I am fair to all networks. I use Twitter and Google+ the most. Much of my Google+ activity is in communities. - Louis Gray
FF is a site i see in e-mails, facebook is the network of people I know. Google plus is the reason I use Android now and twitter is thrown to the history books. The community has left twitter. I'm on app.net instead. - Richard A.
I much prefer the Friendfeed interface and feature set for information sharing and discussion over Facebook, Google+, Twitter and all blog platforms. Imagine where FF would be now if it had remained in intensive forward development and tweaking for the past few years. - Sean McBride
Why the preference? -- highest signal to noise in terms of the overall user experience. Look at how clean this page is. Look at how much information is on it. Look at how easy it is to follow conversations and add comments. I could go on and on.... - Sean McBride
But is the clean look/user experience a function of the fact that FF has been basically left alone? I enjoy the way it works, too. And I often wonder why more socnets don't adopt it's interface and feature set. And then it occurs to me that twitter and Facebook were a lot cleaner before the developers started fiddling with them. Also: it is undeniable that FF is great but it's no Google Wave ... *runs* - MoTO: Tufted Coqeutte
@Sean, I think my allegiance to FriendFeed for 6-7 years is well documented. You also know I wish they'd had a chance to grow without being acquired. - Louis Gray
Louis -- you have always had impeccable taste in picking superior technologies. It's unfortunate that sometimes the best technologies don't prevail in the marketplace. It's enough to make a grown man weep. - Sean McBride
@Sean, please post a video of you crying to YouTube, and share it. - Louis Gray
Please -- I must maintain my dignity. :) - Sean McBride
I keep wondering if there are any far-seeing parties out there who could revive FF, bring it back from its state of suspended animation. Such a dreamer. - Sean McBride
I still have the app running telling me about new posts. - Daniel W. Crompton
Louis it's still a source of complete bewilderment to me that your friends at Google didn't buy it. Has to be one of the worst "passes" in tech history. - JSLeFanu
Only the people there know the whole story, JS. - Louis Gray from Android
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: A perfect minimal Capistrano deploy.rb for Rails and Unicorn with rolling restarts - http://blog.intercityup.com/a-perfe...
"It doesn't actually restart, it creates a fork from which it it spawns the new process with children. It could be a ruby 1.9 issue, which is resolved in 2.0." - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: A perfect minimal Capistrano deploy.rb for Rails and Unicorn with rolling restarts - http://blog.intercityup.com/a-perfe...
"I've found that the rolling restart of Unicorn using USR2 sometimes neglects to pickup changes, requiring a full stop/start." - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: A Theory On The Rise Of Tweetstorms - http://blog.semilshah.com/2014...
"Like a stream of consciousness, I suppose that that is possible. That would mean that if you notice a serious mistake you would need te remove the storm up until the mistake or it won't make sense." - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: A Theory On The Rise Of Tweetstorms - http://blog.semilshah.com/2014...
"I've never understood why they start with 1/... they should post in reverse order." - Daniel W. Crompton
Thomas Power
@markshaw Klout or PeerIndex or Followerwonk or a combo or a.n.other
I was a little concerned with Followerwonk's buying of directed tweets from twitter bot networks, so I decided against using it... - Daniel W. Crompton
wil wheaton
If my math is correct, we're about 30 minutes away from rolling camera on the first episode of @wilwproject.
Cool! Sadly only in the US... - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Suspended Animation Trials Start - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Suspended Animation Trials Start The researchers behind it don't want to call it suspended animation, but it's the most conventional way to explain it. The world's first humans trials - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Reshared post from Gregory B. Sadler: - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Dr. Sadler's Philosophy Forum, Featuring Robert Skiff@rskiff Original Post from Gregory B. Sadler: In the sixth Dr. Sadler's Philosophy Forum, we'll be discussing a topic that is often in the news these days -- college and university education, which gets portrayed as absolutely essential, a waste of time, every person's right, a product for the privileged few, and everything in between. My guest for this installment is Robert Skiff, the CEO of Oplerno, a new for-profit education company which has developed a new model which puts the work and needs of adjunct professors and their students first. (full disclosure -- I'm currently developing an Existentialism course for Oplerno myself). We'll be ranging over a number of topics -- the unsustainability of the current education system, the problems with some of the proposed "game-changers" (think, e.g. MOOCs), the needs of students and how they're not being met, the crushing burden (and bubble) of student debt. . . . and perhaps even what... - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Velodyne: On Sound, LIDar and Marine Technology +Velodyne makes some cool stuff, which this great interview... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Velodyne: On Sound, LIDar and Marine Technology +Velodyne makes some cool stuff, which this great interview by +Robert Scoble with Velodyne CEO David Hall. Have a look at the boat 21:00 Velodyne: On Sound, LiDar, and Marine Technologies - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Writing Software #xp   #tdd Now I understand what +David Heinemeier Hannson means, couldn't agree ... - https://plus.google.com/1056027...
Writing Software #xp   #tdd   Now I understand what +David Heinemeier Hannson means, couldn't agree more. RailsConf 2014 - Keynote: Writing Software by David Heinemeier Hansson - Daniel W. Crompton
Daniel W. Crompton
Re: 6 Things You Need To Do Before You Live Tweet An Event - http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwit...
"I would use http://www.noterlive.com/, besides from allowing you to live tweet and follow the event it also creates a HTML record with real names with the tweets which you can later post in an article." - Daniel W. Crompton
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