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John (bird whisperer)
This article is maddening... The killing agency: USDA Wildlife Services' brutal methods leave a trail of animal death - The Sacramento Bee - http://www.sacbee.com/2012...
This article is maddening... The killing agency: USDA Wildlife Services' brutal methods leave a trail of animal death - The Sacramento Bee
This article is maddening... The killing agency: USDA Wildlife Services' brutal methods leave a trail of animal death - The Sacramento Bee
This article is maddening... The killing agency: USDA Wildlife Services' brutal methods leave a trail of animal death - The Sacramento Bee
"Strader's employer, a branch of the federal Department of Agriculture called Wildlife Services, has long specialized in killing animals that are deemed a threat to agriculture, the public and – more recently – the environment. Since 2000, its employees have killed nearly a million coyotes, mostly in the West. They have destroyed millions of birds, from nonnative starlings to migratory shorebirds, along with a colorful menagerie of more than 300 other species, including black bears, beavers, porcupines, river otters, mountain lions and wolves. And in most cases, they have officially revealed little or no detail about where the creatures were killed, or why. But a Bee investigation has found the agency's practices to be indiscriminate, at odds with science, inhumane and sometimes illegal." - John (bird whisperer) from Bookmarklet
"In all, more than 150 species have been killed by mistake by Wildlife Services traps, snares and cyanide poison since 2000, records show. A list could fill a field guide. Here are some examples: Armadillos, badgers, great-horned owls, hog-nosed skunks, javelina, pronghorn antelope, porcupines, great blue herons, ruddy ducks, snapping turtles, turkey vultures, long-tailed weasels, marmots, mourning doves, red-tailed hawks, sandhill cranes and ringtails. Many are off-limits to hunters and trappers. And some species, including swift foxes, kit foxes and river otter, are the focus of conservation and restoration efforts. "The irony is state governments and the federal government are spending millions of dollars to preserve species and then … (you have) Wildlife Services out there killing the same animals," said Michael Mares, president of the American Society of Mammalogists. "It boggles the mind." One critical loss occurred two years ago when a wolverine, one of the rarest mammals in America, stepped into a Wildlife Services leg-hold trap in Payette National Forest in Idaho. It was the third wolverine captured in agency traps since 2004 (the other two were released alive.) "Shot wolverine due to bad foot," the trapper wrote in his field diary, which The Bee obtained through the Freedom of Information Act." - John (bird whisperer)
"Poisoning predators with cyanide is not the agency's only risky practice. Killing coyotes from low-flying planes and helicopters is, too. Since 1989, several employees have been injured in crashes and 10 people have died, including two in Utah in 2007, one of them a good friend of Strader, the former agency trapper. "I went to the funeral," Strader said. "He was just a real nice guy, funny, joking around all the time. And he got killed for what? To kill a stinking coyote. It don't make sense. "We ain't threatened by coyotes so much that we've got to lose peoples' lives over it," Strader said." - John (bird whisperer)
"No mammal draws more agency lethal force in California and the West than the coyote. Records show that most are killed in rural regions, such as Lassen, Modoc and Kern counties, where they are considered a threat to livestock. "It's a very valuable program," said Joe Moreo, agricultural commissioner in Modoc County. "We have very good trappers up here, and we're fortunate we have them." But coyotes are also killed where people like to hear their howls and yips, including Alpine County, south of Lake Tahoe. Since 2007, Wildlife Services has killed more than 120 coyotes in Alpine County. "Coyotes are part of our magical landscape," said John Brissenden, a former county supervisor who manages Sorensen's Resort along the west fork of the Carson River. "Our primary motivator for people coming here is the wildlife and the outdoors. That's what our business is built on. It's what Alpine County's commerce is built on. To take that away makes no sense." Many coyotes were killed in the middle of winter, when they are easier to spot and shoot, including 15 in February 2010. Hawkins, the agency spokesman, said the animals were killed "in the protection of livestock." Asked where – public land or private? – Hawkins said he didn't know." - John (bird whisperer)
Part 2, on killing coyotes to protect livestock and mule deer: http://www.sacbee.com/2012... - John (bird whisperer)
I was just about to read that. :-D - John (bird whisperer)
And this is why you're my favoritest. :D - Hookuh Tinypants
This latest NYT video disgusts me. http://www.nytimes.com/video... - Ken Morley
USDA also kills horses. (when horses are on public lands, they are BLM, highly regulated. When on other lands, they fall under the control of USDA, who lacks most restrictions on actions towards the wild horses) - RudĩϐЯaЯïan
It's crazy how much power Wildlife Services has to circumvent regulations that other agencies have to operate under. - John (bird whisperer)