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Wildcat
Wildcat
Manifesto for a Theory of the ‘New Aesthetic’ | Mute - http://www.metamute.org/editori... (via http://friendfeed.com/wildcat...)
Wildcat
Wildcat
The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness - Shunya's Notes - http://blog.shunya.net/shunyas... (via http://friendfeed.com/mind-br...)
The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness - Shunya's Notes - http://blog.shunya.net/shunyas_blog/2012/09/the-cambridge-declaration-on-consciousness.html (via http://ff.im/13L1Qs)
Wildcat
There Is No Point Making Robots Look and Act Like Humans | Gadget Lab | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/gadgetl...
There Is No Point Making Robots Look and Act Like Humans | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"The Terminator, C-3PO, the Cylons, and the Jetsons’ robotic maid Rosie are all highly agile and memorable humanoid robots from science fiction. They are intelligent, nimble, dexterous, autonomous and you never see them plugged into an energy source, waiting to refuel. Now take Asimo, described by its maker Honda as “the world’s most advanced humanoid robot.” There is no denying that the robot is spectacular, walking and even running with ease on two legs, responding to voice commands and mapping its environment using camera “eyes”. However, it requires at least one person (and preferably two) to control it, almost a day to set up and can operate for just one hour on a single 51.8v lithium ion battery which requires three hours to recharge. Despite wonderful technological advances, the humanoids that we have created so far fall extremely short of those we have imagined within movies and books. At the Innorobo robotics summit in Lyon last week, I saw all sorts of delightful and... more... - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
‘America the Philosophical,’ by Carlin Romano - NYTimes.com - https://www.nytimes.com/2012... (via http://friendfeed.com/wildcat...)
Wildcat
The Humanities, Digitized. "Our ability to analyze information has created possibilities unimaginable a few generations ago" | Harvard Magazine - http://harvardmagazine.com/2012... (via http://friendfeed.com/culture...)
The Humanities, Digitized. "Our ability to analyze information has created possibilities unimaginable a few generations ago" | Harvard Magazine - http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/05/the-humanities-digitized (via http://ff.im/10Ffmt)
The Humanities, Digitized. "Our ability to analyze information has created possibilities unimaginable a few generations ago" | Harvard Magazine - http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/05/the-humanities-digitized (via http://ff.im/10Ffmt)
Wildcat
Wildcat
Music, Mind, and Meaning by Marvin Minsky | MIT (1981) - http://web.media.mit.edu/~minsky... (via http://friendfeed.com/music-c...)
Music, Mind, and Meaning by Marvin Minsky | MIT (1981) - http://web.media.mit.edu/~minsky/papers/MusicMindMeaning.html (via http://ff.im/ZFtvf)
Wildcat
PhilPapers: Online Research in Philosophy | University of London & Australian National University http://philpapers.org/ (via http://friendfeed.com/loveofw...)
ancient-philosopher.23445720_std.jpg
Wildcat
Philip K. Dick, Sci-Fi Philosopher, Part 1 - NYTimes.com - http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012...
"What Dick lacks in academic and scholarly rigor, he more than makes up for in powers of imagination and rich lateral, cumulative association. If he had known more, it might have led him to produce less interesting chains of ideas. In a later remark in “Exegesis,” Dick writes, “I am a fictionalizing philosopher, not a novelist.” He interestingly goes on to add, “The core of my writing is not art but truth.” We seem to be facing an apparent paradox, where the concern with truth, the classical goal of the philosopher, is not judged to be in opposition to fiction, but itself a work a fiction. Dick saw his fiction writing as the creative attempt to describe what he discerned as the true reality. He adds, “I am basically analytical, not creative; my writing is simply a creative way of handling analysis.”" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
In Defense of Polymaths - Kyle Wiens - Harvard Business Review - http://blogs.hbr.org/cs...
"Polymath is one of those words more likely to show up on the SAT than in everyday conversation. But the reason we don't use the word much these days has less to do with vocabulary than it has to do with practicality: there aren't a lot of polymaths around anymore. In case you don't have your pocket dictionary handy, a polymath is a person with a wide range of knowledge or learning. Think people like Leonardo da Vinci (artist and helicopter designer), Benjamin Franklin (founding father, inventor, and all-around lady-killer), Paul Robeson (scholar, athlete, actor, and civil rights activist), and even Steve Jobs (engineer, businessman extraordinaire, and marketing mastermind). Still, while we admire the select "geniuses" that can do it all, we tend to disparage the regular folk who attempt to spread their knowledge around a little. If they are so foolish as to dabble instead of devoting themselves to a single calling, those unfortunates sometimes earn the time-dishonored label of "Jack of all trades, master of none."" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
The Self Illusion: How the Brain Creates Identity | Edge - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post... (via http://friendfeed.com/mind-br...)
The Self Illusion: How the Brain Creates Identity | Edge - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post/23235722210/the-self-illusion-how-the-brain-creates-identity (via http://ff.im/WOG1J)
Wildcat
A worthy read: Is Death Bad for You? - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - https://chronicle.com/article...
"By Shelly Kagan We all believe that death is bad. But why is death bad?" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
What Part of Our Brain Makes Us Human? | Popular Science - http://www.popsci.com/science...
Wildcat
David Eagleman on how we constructs reality, time perception, and The Secret Lives of the Brain - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post... (via http://friendfeed.com/mind-br...)
David Eagleman on how we constructs reality, time perception, and The Secret Lives of the Brain - http://aminotes.tumblr.com/post/7722763662/david-eagleman-on-how-we-constructs-reality-time (via http://ff.im/I2gUu)
Wildcat
Wildcat
Wildcat
Layar + “Er is post!” = Interactive Print, if you’re Dutch. RealityAugmented — A blog about augmented reality in the 21st century. - http://www.realityaugmentedblog.com/
my new entry at Reality Augmented - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Microsoft Builds a Browser for Your Past - Technology Review - http://www.technologyreview.com/computi...
Microsoft Builds a Browser for Your Past - Technology Review
"Mining personal data to discover what people care about has become big business for companies such as Facebook and Google. Now a project from Microsoft Research is trying to bring that kind of data mining back home to help people explore their own piles of personal digital data. Software called Lifebrowser processes photos, e-mails, Web browsing and search history, calendar events, and other documents stored on a person's computer and identifies landmark events. Its timeline interface can explore, search, and discover those landmarks as a kind of memory aid." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Spaceweaver
Pasta-shaped radio waves beamed across Venice - http://www.physorg.com/news...
A group of Italian and Swedish researchers appears to have solved the problem of radio congestion by cleverly twisting radio waves into the shape of fusilli pasta, allowing a potentially infinite number of channels to be broadcast and received. - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Jamreilly
Henrietta Snow Leavitt: The Woman Who Discovered the Key to Measuring the Universe - http://www.lastwordonnothing.com/2012...
Henrietta Snow Leavitt: The Woman Who Discovered the Key to Measuring the Universe
Henrietta Snow Leavitt: The Woman Who Discovered the Key to Measuring the Universe
"By the late 1800s, astronomy had moved on from simple human observation to the collection of images of the sky on photographic plates — pieces of glass coated with light-sensitive silver salts. At the time they were made, these plates could be analyzed only through tedious, labor-intensive work. A person had to scan and measure and compare stars in the images before their position and brightness could be calculated and discoveries made. In 1879, Edward Pickering, head of the Harvard College Observatory, began hiring women to do this work." - Jamreilly from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Gene found to have jumped from gut bacteria to beetle - http://www.physorg.com/news...
Gene found to have jumped from gut bacteria to beetle
Genes jumping between bacteria are rather common which in part explains their ability to rapidly develop immunity to antibacterial agents. What’s not so common are examples of genes jumping between animals or between bacteria and insects. This is why the findings of a team of researchers studying the coffee berry borer beetle are so surprising. It’s an insect that has, as the team describes in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, developed a means for excreting a protein that allows it to break down sugars in coffee beans, by somehow stealing a gene from a type of bacteria that lives in its gut. - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
"Time Crystals" Could Be a Legitimate Form of Perpetual Motion: Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
"Time Crystals" Could Be a Legitimate Form of Perpetual Motion: Scientific American
The phrases "perpetual-motion machine"—a concept derided by scientists since the mid-19th century—and "physics Nobel laureate Frank Wilczek" wouldn't seem to belong in the same sentence. But if Wilczek's latest ideas on symmetry and the nature of time are correct, they would suggest the existence of a bona fide perpetual-motion machine— albeit one from which energy could never be extracted. He proposes that matter could form a "time crystal," whose structure would repeat periodically, as with an ordinary crystal, but in time rather than in space. Such a crystal would represent a previously unknown state of matter and might have arisen as the very early universe cooled, losing its primordial symmetries. - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
33rd Square | Flatworms May Hold Key to Immortality - http://www.33rdsquare.com/2012...
33rd Square | Flatworms May Hold Key to Immortality
British scientists have found that a species of flatworm can overcome the process of ageing to become potentially immortal and say their work sheds light on possibilities of alleviating ageing and age-related characteristics in human cells. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal on Monday the researchers found that the flatworms, known as planarian worms, can continuously maintain the length of a crucial part of their DNA, known as telomeres, during regeneration. - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Computer programs that think like humans - http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_rel...
"Intelligence – what does it really mean? In the 1800s, it meant that you were good at memorising things, and today intelligence is measured through IQ tests where the average score for humans is 100. Researchers at the Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have created a computer programme that can score 150. IQ tests are based on two types of problems: progressive matrices, which test the ability to see patterns in pictures, and number sequences, which test the ability to see patterns in numbers. The most common math computer programmes score below 100 on IQ tests with number sequences. For Claes Strannegård, researcher at the Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, this was a reason to try to design 'smarter' computer programmes. 'We're trying to make programmes that can discover the same types of patterns that humans can see,' he says. The research group, which consists of Claes Strannegård,... more... - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Study of the Day: Soon, You May Download New Skills to Your Brain - http://www.theatlantic.com/health...
Study of the Day: Soon, You May Download New Skills to Your Brain
PROBLEM: Unlike Neo in The Matrix or the titular superspy in the comedy series Chuck, we can't master kung fu just by beaming information to our brain. We have to put in time and effort to learn new skills. METHODOLOGY: Researchers from Boston University and Japan's ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories designed a decoded functional MRI neurofeedback method that induces a pre-recorded activation pattern in targeted early visual brain areas that could also produce the pattern through regular learning. They then tested whether repetitions of the fMRI pattern caused an improvement in the performance of that visual feature. - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
How would you like your bionic vision? | KurzweilAI - http://www.kurzweilai.net/how-wou...
How would you like your bionic vision? | KurzweilAI
"The eye is going bionic, and companies are competing to develop the best technologies to restore vision to the blind, IEEE Spectrum Tech Talk reports. The company Second Sight has just brought its retina implant to market in Europe, and is hoping for FDA approval in the U.S. this year. Second Sight uses an external camera (mounted on a pair of sunglasses) to capture visual information, routes the info to a visual processing unit worn on a belt, and then sends the processed image to two antennae implanted around the eyes, where it’s forwarded on to a 60-electrode array that stimulates the remaining retinal cells. German company Retina Implant AG, which has an implant currently undergoing clinical trials in Europe and the U.S., has taken a different approach. Instead of an external camera, they built a camera into the eye itself, using an implant that contains an array of 1500 photodiodes with amplifiers and electrodes. The photodiodes convert light signals into electric signals, which attached electrodes send via the optic nerve to the brain." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
The Willpower Trick | Wired Science | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/wiredsc...
The Willpower Trick | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Mischel refers to this skill as the “strategic allocation of attention,” and he argues that it’s the skill underlying self-control. Too often, we assume that willpower is about having strong moral fiber or gritting our teeth and staring down the treat. But that’s wrong — willpower is really about properly directing the spotlight of attention, learning how to control that short list of thoughts in working memory. It’s about realizing that if we’re thinking about the marshmallow we’re going to eat it, which is why we need to look away." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
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