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Wildcat
Japanese Telexistence Robot Is Like a Real-Life Avatar | Gadget Lab | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/gadgetl...
Japanese Telexistence Robot Is Like a Real-Life Avatar | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"We’ve seen robotic stand-ins portrayed in movies like Avatar and Surrogates. Now, researchers are developing them in earnest. The Telesar V Robot Avatar is one such robot, potentially allowing you to experience a foreign or distant world without actually being there. The Telesar V can deliver a remote experience straight to its operator, transmitting sight, sound and touch data using a series of sensors and a 3D head-mounted display. The robot’s operator wears a 3D display helmet, which relays the robot’s entire field of view. A set of headphones transmit what the robot can hear." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
It takes two: Brains come wired for cooperation, neuroscientists discover - http://www.sciencedaily.com/release...
"ScienceDaily (Nov. 3, 2011) — When Nancy Grace and her partner danced a lively rumba to Spandau Ballet's 1980's hit, "True," on a recent "Dancing With the Stars," more was going on in the legal commentator's brain than worry over a possible wardrobe malfunction." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Mathematics Documentaries collection | CosmoLearning (videos) - http://www.cosmolearning.com/mathema... (via http://friendfeed.com/science...)
Mathematics Documentaries collection | CosmoLearning (videos) - http://www.cosmolearning.com/mathematics/documentaries/ (via http://ff.im/NOyK9)
Mathematics Documentaries collection | CosmoLearning (videos) - http://www.cosmolearning.com/mathematics/documentaries/ (via http://ff.im/NOyK9)
Mathematics Documentaries collection | CosmoLearning (videos) - http://www.cosmolearning.com/mathematics/documentaries/ (via http://ff.im/NOyK9)
Spaceweaver
Telexistence robot avatar transmits sight, hearing and touch - http://www.kurzweilai.net/telexis...
Telexistence robot avatar transmits sight, hearing and touch
"TELESAR V, a “telexistence” robot system being researched at Keio University, aims to free people from time and space constraints by using remotely operated robots to interact with the remote environment, reports DigInfoTV. The operator uses a 3D head mounted display that covers the entire field of view, to see exactly what the robot can see, and also hear. The sense of touch, recorded using force vectors and temperature data obtained by the robot’s sensors, is also transmitted to the operator, allowing them to feel the shape and temperature of objects." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
A limitless power source for the indefinite future | KurzweilAI - http://www.kurzweilai.net/a-limit...
A limitless power source for the indefinite future | KurzweilAI
Show all
"On Monday, the National Space Society (NSS) will present findings from a bombshell new report by the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). You’re hearing about this here first. (Full disclosure: I’m a member of the NSS board of directors.) Its findings include: Space solar power appears to be technically feasible within 10–20 years using technologies existing now in the laboratory; It appears to be economically viable in the next 1–3 decades under several different scenarios for future energy markets, including potential government actions to mediate environment/climate change issues; Low-cost Earth-to-orbit transportation systems appear to be technically feasible during the coming 20–30 years using technologies existing in the laboratory now; Flight experiments are needed, and policy-related and regulatory issues must be resolved." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
$1,000 genome in two hours by 2012, says CEO of Ion Torrent (w/Video) - http://www.kurzweilai.net/1000-ge...
$1,000 genome in two hours by 2012, says CEO of Ion Torrent (w/Video)
"The mythical “$1,000 genome” will be here next year, said Jonathan Rothberg, CEO of sequencing technology company Ion Torrent, at MIT’s Emerging Technology conference, Technology Review Mims’ Bits reports. The rate at which genome sequencing has become more affordable is faster than Moore’s law. “By this time next year, sequencing human genomes [will be] as fast and cheap as bacterial genome,” said Rothberg, and can now do an entire bacterial genome in about two hours. This Personal Genome Machine technology works almost entirely through microchip technology instead of wet chemistry. It is already being used to determine which mutations are present in the genomes of patients’ cancers" - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle that will change the way water cleans :: University of Southampton - http://www.soton.ac.uk/mediace...
Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle that will change the way water cleans :: University of Southampton
"team of scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a revolutionary ultrasonic attachment for taps, which massively enhances the ability of water to clean. Currently, industry uses excessive water, power and additives for cleaning. For example, it can take up to 100 tonnes of water to produce 1 tonne of clean wool after shearing. Many industrial processes also generate large quantities of contaminated run-off. The water from hosing down an abattoir represents a real health risk and cannot be allowed to enter the water supply. Purifying run-off is costly – each cubic metre of water used for cleaning in the nuclear industry can cost around £10,000 to subsequently treat. Professor Tim Leighton and Dr Peter Birkin’s device works with cold water, minimal additives and consumes as much electrical power as a light bulb. Its application will be wide – licenses have already been sold to a number of industries to look at cleaning in food preparation, hospitals, manufacturing and the home. The new technology consumes less water and power than the established competitor technologies." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Royal Society journal archive made permanently free to access- free archive - http://royalsocietypublishing.org/site...
Royal Society journal archive made permanently free to access- free archive
"The Royal Society continues to support scientific discovery by allowing free access to more than 250 years of leading research. From October 2011, our world-famous journal archive - comprising more than 69,000 articles - will be opened up and all articles more than 70 years old will be made permanently free to access." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Pentagon Regrowing Soldiers’ Muscles From Pig Cells | Danger Room | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/dangerr...
Pentagon Regrowing Soldiers’ Muscles From Pig Cells | Danger Room | Wired.com
"A few pig cells, a single surgery and a rigorous daily workout: They’re the three ingredients that patients will need to re-grow fresh, functional slabs of their own muscle, courtesy of Pentagon-backed science that’s already being used to rebuild parts of people. The research team behind the project, based out of the University of Pittsburgh, has made remarkably swift progress: Mere months after starting their first-ever clinical trial, they’ve already operated on four soldiers and are now training groups of surgeons from across the country in perfecting the approach. If progress continues at this pace, the trial will wrap in 24 months and the technique will become “a standard of care for orthopedists and trauma surgeons,” according to Dr. Stephen Badylak, head of the initiative." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
The Neuroscience of Barbie:A fascinating experiment that lets people experience reality as dolls--or giants Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/article...
The Neuroscience of Barbie:A fascinating experiment that lets people experience reality as dolls--or giants Scientific American
"In science fiction and fantasy tales, there is a long running fascination with the idea of dramatically diminishing or growing in stature. In the 1989 classic, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Rick Moranis invents a device which accidentally shrinks both his own and the neighbor’s children down to a quarter-of-an-inch tall. Preceding this by more than 100 years, Lewis Carroll wrote about a little girl who, after tumbling down a rabbit hole, nibbles on some cake and then grows to massive proportions. Nearly 300 years ago, Jonathan Swift described the adventures of Gulliver while on the island of Lilliputan, on which he is a giant, and then on the island of Brobdingnag, where everyone else is a giant." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
The Mind is a Metaphor ☞ interactive, solidly constructed collection of mental metaphorics (database) - http://mind.textdriven.com/db... (via http://friendfeed.com/literat...)
The Mind is a Metaphor ☞ interactive, solidly constructed collection of mental metaphorics (database) - http://mind.textdriven.com/db/browse.php (via http://ff.im/AJX6I)
Wildcat
Mask-bot: A talking video humanoid robot | KurzweilAI - http://www.kurzweilai.net/mask-bo...
Mask-bot: A talking video humanoid robot | KurzweilAI
"Welcome to the creepiest uncanny-valley experience yet: a talking robot face called Mask-bot, developed by a team at the Institute for Cognitive Systems (ICS) at TU München and AIST, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan. What sets Mask-bot apart is that it can instantly construct and project a static video image of anyone’s face (from a photo) on a 3D surface, and it moves its virtual head a little and raises its eyebrows as you speak, to create the impression that it understands. (It doesn’t. Yet.) Also, it projects image from behind, making it more realistic (unlike Disney animatronics characters, for example, which are projected from the front), and works in daylight. It’s also more flexible than existing humanoid robots, which use a complex set of mechanical parts and must be custom-designed." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
An 'Operating System' That Runs on Cells Could Create Whole New Life Forms | Popular Science - http://www.popsci.com/science...
An 'Operating System' That Runs on Cells Could Create Whole New Life Forms | Popular Science
"At the University of Nottingham, a team of researchers is spearheading an ambitious project that could pull synthetic biology out of its niche and into the mainstream. With help from researchers elsewhere in the U.K., the U.S., Israel, and Spain, the team is trying to create a “reprogrammable cell” that can act as the in vivo cell equivalent to a computer’s operating system. In other words, they are trying to create cellular software that would let researchers alter living cells without changing their hardware. The project, if successful, would mark a huge leap forward for synthetic biology as a field. Scientists could easily and quickly program cells to perform all kinds of tasks as well as create wholly new forms of life not found in nature customized for various uses. That’s another way of saying the “operating system” would allow for rapid prototyping of life forms, saving the time and energy currently consumed by returning to the drawing board each time researchers need a cell with a new function." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
'Rejuvenated' stem cells coaxed from centenarian - http://medicalxpress.com/news...
'Rejuvenated' stem cells coaxed from centenarian
"Scientists said Tuesday they had transformed age-worn cells in people over 90 -- including a centenarian -- into rejuvenated stemcells that were "indistinguishable" from those found in embryos. The technical feat, reported in the peer-reviewed journal Genes & Development, opens a new path toward regenerative medicine, especially for the elderly, the researchers said. "This is a new paradigm for cell rejuvenation," said Jean-Marc Lemaitre, a researcher at the Institute of Functional Genomics at the University of Montpellier and the main architect of the study. "The age of cells is definitely not a barrier to reprogramming," he told AFP by phone. That human embryonic stem cells (ESC) can potentially become any type of cell in the body has long held out the tantalizing promise of diseased organs or tissue being repaired or replaced with healthy, lab-grown cells." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
DNA origami-Researchers fabricate DNA strands on a reusable chip, fold them into novel nanostructures - http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_rel...
"In the emerging field of synthetic biology, engineers use biological building blocks, such as snippets of DNA, to construct novel technologies. One of the key challenges in the field is finding a way to quickly and economically synthesize the desired DNA strands. Now scientists from Duke University have fabricated a reusable DNA chip that may help address this problem by acting as a template from which multiple batches of DNA building blocks can be photocopied. The researchers have used the device to create strands of DNA which they then folded into unique nanoscale structures. They will present their findings at the AVS Symposium, held Oct. 30 – Nov. 4, in Nashville, Tennessee." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
IBM Open-Sources Potential "Internet of Things" Protocol - http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack...
IBM Open-Sources Potential "Internet of Things" Protocol
"The openly stated goal from IBM is to produce a completely new world-wide web, one comprised of the messages that digitally empowered devices would send to one another. It is the same Internet, but not the same Web. This morning in Ludwigsburg, Germany, IBM announced it is joining with Italy-based hardware architecture firm Eurotech in donating a complete draft protocol for asynchronous inter-device communication to the Eclipse Foundation. It would be the current data explosion, times itself. A projected 24 billion simultaneous devices by the year 2020, including RFID tags on shipping crates, heart rate monitors, GPS devices, smartphone firmware, automobile maintenance systems, and yes, not a joke, earrings may become more socially active than any teenage human being presently alive. Tens of billions of devices, billions of messages per hour. It is being called Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) protocol, the machine-to-machine counterpart of HTTP. This afternoon,... more... - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
This is very good news on a range of fronts but I'm also interested in whether they will release the product built on top of MQTT, the Fabric for Sensors which is a very powerful messaging system for sensor networks in the broadest sense. - Cameron Neylon
Wildcat
"This past January, at the St. Innocent Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Anchorage, Alaska, friends and relatives gathered to bid their last farewell to Marie Smith Jones, a beloved matriarch of her community. At 89 years old, she was the last fluent speaker of the Eyak language. In May 2007 a cavalry of the Janjaweed — the notorious Sudanese militia responsible for the ongoing genocide of the indigenous people of Darfur — made its way across the border into neighboring Chad. They were hunting for 1.5 tons of confiscated ivory, worth nearly $1.5 million, locked in a storeroom in Zakouma National Park. Around the same time, a wave of mysterious frog disappearances that had been confounding herpetologists worldwide spread to the US Pacific Northwest. It was soon discovered that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a deadly fungus native to southern Africa, had found its way via such routes as the overseas trade in frog’s legs to Central America, South America, Australia, and now the United... more... - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Toyota's Healthcare Robots Are Ready to Help You With Absolutely Everything - IEEE Spectrum - http://spectrum.ieee.org/automat...
Toyota's Healthcare Robots Are Ready to Help You With Absolutely Everything - IEEE Spectrum
"Healthcare and elder care is a big concern in Japan, whose population is aging more rapidly than their current human-centric infrastructure is prepared to cope with. Companies like Toyota are hoping that robots will be able to pick up a little bit of the slack, and this week they've introduced four new robotic systems designed to help keep people healthy and independent as long as possible. The first couple systems are designed to provide single-leg walking assistance to people who have balance issues, or even people suffering from complete paralysis in one leg. The robotic structure (it's a lot like Cyberdyne's exoskeleton) is capable of supporting the entirety of your weight on one leg, and it will swing your leg forward for you as you walk. If you can hold yourself up, the second system will provide you with visual feedback to help you get your balance back and start walking on your own." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Lasers power Pentagon’s next-gen artificial limbs | KurzweilAI - http://www.kurzweilai.net/lasers-...
Lasers power Pentagon’s next-gen artificial limbs | KurzweilAI
"Brain-controlled prosthetic devices powered by lasers and fiber-optics have been developed by DARPA-funded researchers led by experts at Southern Methodist University, Wired Danger Room reports. A fiber-optic prosthetic for a human patient would be affixed at one end to a prosthetic, and attached at the other to the body’s severed nerves. Those are a decade off, but already, researchers say they’ve nearly climbed the project’s biggest hurdle: developing sensors with enough sensitivity to detect and trigger the infinitesimally small perturbations of a single activated nerve. The new micro-sensors developed for the project are compatible with the body’s tissues and small enough to fit hundreds onto a single optical fiber. One optical fiber can transmit a ton of signals at a single time and even stimulate a single neuron, making a bundle of them able to transmit exponentially more signals, much faster, with way more specificity than systems relying on electrodes. Current... more... - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Bacteria may readily swap beneficial genes - MIT News Office - http://www.mit.edu/newsoff...
Bacteria may readily swap beneficial genes - MIT News Office
"Much as people can exchange information instantaneously in the digital age, bacteria associated with humans and their livestock appear to freely and rapidly exchange genetic material related to human disease and antibiotic resistance through a mechanism called horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In a paper appearing in Nature online Oct. 30, researchers — led by Eric Alm of MIT's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Biological Engineering — say they've found evidence of a massive network of recent gene exchange connecting bacteria from around the world: 10,000 unique genes flowing via HGT among 2,235 bacterial genomes. HGT is an ancient method for bacteria from different lineages to acquire and share useful genetic information they didn't inherit from their parents. Scientists have long known about HGT and known that when a transferred gene confers a desirable trait, such as antibiotic resistance or pathogenicity, that gene may undergo positive selection... more... - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Spaceweaver
Scientists measure dream content for the first time | KurzweilAI - http://www.kurzweilai.net/scienti...
Scientists measure dream content for the first time | KurzweilAI
"They did this with the help of lucid dreamers, people who become aware of their dreaming state and are able to alter the content of their dreams. The lucid dreamers were asked to become aware of their dream while sleeping in an MRI scanner and to report this “lucid” state to the researchers by means of eye movements. They were then asked to voluntarily “dream” that they were repeatedly clenching first their right fist and then their left one for ten seconds." - Spaceweaver from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain. | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network - http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-b...
"Embodied cognition, the idea that the mind is not only connected to the body but that the body influences the mind, is one of the more counter-intuitive ideas in cognitive science. In sharp contrast is dualism, a theory of mind famously put forth by Rene Descartes in the 17th century when he claimed that “there is a great difference between mind and body, inasmuch as body is by nature always divisible, and the mind is entirely indivisible… the mind or soul of man is entirely different from the body.” In the proceeding centuries, the notion of the disembodied mind flourished. From it, western thought developed two basic ideas: reason is disembodied because the mind is disembodied and reason is transcendent and universal. However, as George Lakoff and Rafeal Núñez explain:" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Does Music Change The Taste Of Wine? | Wired Science | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/wiredsc...
Does Music Change The Taste Of Wine? | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Let’s be blunt: The tongue is really dumb. Unlike the rest of our sensory organs, which are exquisitely sensitive, that lump of exposed muscle sitting in the mouth is a crude perceptual device, able to only detect five different taste sensations. (Your cochlea, in contrast, contains thousands of different hair cells, each of which is tuned to particular wavelengths of sound.)" - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Study: A rich club in the human brain - http://medicalxpress.com/news...
Study: A rich club in the human brain
"Just as the Occupy Wall Street movement has brought more attention to financial disparities between the haves and have-nots in American society, researchers from Indiana University and the University Medical Center Utrecht in The Netherlands are highlighting the disproportionate influence of so called "Rich Clubs" within the human brain." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
One Giant Leap for Machine Kind | Space Flight | DISCOVER Magazine - http://discovermagazine.com/2011...
One Giant Leap for Machine Kind | Space Flight | DISCOVER Magazine
"The robots are out there, dozens of them, going where their soft-bodied, oxygen-breathing creators can’t or won’t anytime soon. They own space. While a handful of humans hunker down in near-Earth orbit in the International Space Station, an aging craft conceived in the Reagan era, unmanned machines at this very moment are orbiting Mercury, trundling across the sands of Mars, even preparing to leave the confines of the solar system. The space station is a thing of beauty in its way, the apotheosis of Apollo-style technology. But in terms of scientific achievements it suffers in comparison with NASA’s spaceborne fleet of robots—currently 55 strong—especially given the large funding gap that has always existed between the manned and unmanned space programs. NASA’s budget for 2012 provides about $4.5 billion for robotic space science, versus $8.3 billion for human space exploration, almost $3 billion of which goes to the station alone. And that is the outlay for a NASA without shuttle flights or plans to send people back to the moon." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Experimental Philosophy: Reviving the "Interpretive Diversity" Hypothesis - http://experimentalphilosophy....
"Adam Bear's last post encouraged me in presenting my own pet hypothesis about the Knobe Effect. It can be found in this paper, written with Emmanuel Dupoux and Pierre Jacob , and forthcoming in Mind & Language. Following Nichols and Ulatowski's proposal, we consider that the Knobe Effect and the Skill Effect can be accounted for only if we accept that "intentionally" has three different meanings that are differently elicited by contextual cues. To put it in a nutshell, here are (roughly) the three meanings: 1) According to Meaning 1, X is done intentionally only if the agent had a pro-attotude towards X. This meaning is preferentially triggered when X is something we expected the agent to desire (where "expectations" can be normative or statistical, and where normative expectations usually trump statistical expectations) 2) According to Meaning 2, X is done intentionally only if the agent was not reluctant or forced to do X. This meaning is preferentially triggered when X is... more... - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Montreal Study: 'With Age Comes Wisdom,' Older People Still Sharp, Better at Tasks - International Business Times - http://au.ibtimes.com/article...
Montreal Study: 'With Age Comes Wisdom,' Older People Still Sharp, Better at Tasks - International Business Times
"Wisdom does comes with old age, a study has recently found out. Canadian researchers studied 24 young people aged 18 to 35 and a group of ten older people aged 55 to 75, all of whom are still employed." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
The Rise of the Internet (Anti)-Intellectual? » Cyborgology - http://thesocietypages.org/cyborgo...
The Rise of the Internet (Anti)-Intellectual? » Cyborgology
"The title of this post is an homage to two recent essays, the first being Larry Sanger’s “Is There a New Geek Anti-Intellectualism?” and the second Evgeny Morozov’s “The Internet Intellectual”, a recent scathing review of Jeff Jarvis’ latest book. Larry Sanger’s critique of “geek” culture as anti-intellectual is a powerful read (even though I wrote a sort-of critique of Sanger’s post here; and he replied to me here). Sanger’s fundamental point is that modern geek culture is characterized by an anti-intellectual rejection of experts and I want to bring in Morozov’s review to highlight a slightly different point: the techno-experts embraced are anti-intellectual themselves. My goal in this short piece is to encourage the reader to take a look at these two essays in tandem to suggest a further conversation about the need for public intellectuals, the role of academics in framing theories of new technologies and what the consequences are when we leave this discussion to be dominated by business folks." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
First step toward a general method of creating artificial self-replicating materials of arbitrary structure and composition starting with Structural DNA seeds and tiles - http://nextbigfuture.com/2011...
First step toward a general method of creating artificial self-replicating materials of arbitrary structure and composition starting with Structural DNA seeds and tiles
"The discovery in Nature reports the first steps toward a general process for self-replication of a wide variety of arbitrarily designed seeds. The seeds are made from DNA tile motifs that serve as letters arranged to spell out a particular word. The replication process preserves the letter sequence and the shape of the seed and hence the information required to produce further generations. This process holds much promise for the creation of new materials. DNA is a robust functional entity that can organize itself and other molecules into complex structures. More recently DNA has been used to organize inorganic matter, such as metallic particles, as well. The re-creation by the NYU scientists of this type of assembly in a laboratory raises the prospect for the eventual development of self-replicating materials that possess a wide range of patterns and that can perform a variety of functions. The breakthrough the NYU researchers have achieved is the replication of a system that... more... - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
Wildcat
Six Reasons Why I’m Not On Facebook, By Wired UK’s Editor | Epicenter | Wired.com - http://www.wired.com/epicent...
Six Reasons Why I’m Not On Facebook, By Wired UK’s Editor | Epicenter | Wired.com
"“David, you’re sounding like an old dude!” Matt Flannery, who runs social-lending website Kiva, couldn’t understand when I explained that, no, I wouldn’t be keeping in touch with him via Facebook. “What are you worried about?” he teased in a break at the PINC conference in Holland. “Only old guys get worked up about privacy.” Well, Matt, I admit I’m the wrong side of 30, and that I still avoid using emoticons in formal correspondence. But let me explain why I’m not active on Facebook, nor sharing my credit-card purchases on Blippy, nor allowing Google Buzz to mine my contacts list, nor even publishing my DNA on 23andMe.com. My cautious use of the social networks has nothing to do with paranoia about privacy; and yes, I celebrate the unprecedented transparency and connectivity that these services can empower. But what’s increasingly bothering me is the wider social and political cost of our ever-greater enmeshment in these proprietary networks. Here are half a dozen reasons why." - Wildcat from Bookmarklet
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