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Nils Sandin › Likes

Mark H
Mark H
Dominik Schwind
So, now the marriage to the dude from Nickelback is only the second worst thing Avril Lavigne has done so far. https://t.co/XKgWVgL4EW
Mark H
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Definitive Oral History of a TV Masterpiece - http://www.wired.com/2014...
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Definitive Oral History of a TV Masterpiece
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Definitive Oral History of a TV Masterpiece
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Definitive Oral History of a TV Masterpiece
"Fans of Mystery Science tend to be above-average smart—you know, B-plus students and higher. And those are some of the people that first adopted the Internet. They were very passionate about the show. Later we did our first national convention, and about 2,500 people flew in from around the country. We also did the first live show, and afterward we had a party. On Monday morning somebody looked at one of these Usenet groups and there was a detailed, blow-by-blow description of who had come to the party, who they’d danced with, who had been drinking, and who hadn’t." - Mark H from Bookmarklet
Louis Gray
Why Nest Protect Reporting an Emergency Filled Me With Comfort - http://blog.louisgray.com/2014...
Why Nest Protect Reporting an Emergency Filled Me With Comfort
"This morning, my Nexus 5 chirped with a notification I hadn't seen before. While I was at the office, my Nest application was telling me, in no uncertain terms, that there was an Emergency in the kitchen at home. There was smoke, and the alarm from our Nest Protect smoke alarm was sounding. I called home quickly, and my wife told me, embarrassed, there was simply a small issue with the microwave, and all was fine." - Louis Gray from Bookmarklet
I really did tweet first and then call home. :) - Louis Gray
Ah, Louis. - WoH: Professor MOTHRA
I figured my wife had it under control and didn't want to answer the phone while waving her hands at the device. :) - Louis Gray
So, you get notified every time someone makes the toast a little too dark? As paranoid as I am about fire, I'm not sure I'd like that. It would drive me bonkers to be carrying around a device that notifies me every time my hubby cooks something, without telling me what he is actually cooking. - April Russo
April, it's the first time I've ever been notified. As my home is appropriately smokey, it was a good call. - Louis Gray
Louis, I think you might have miss the humor in my statement. - April Russo
Oh yeah. I have zero sense of humor. Zero. :) - Louis Gray
Why do you have a smoke detector in your kitchen? - Brian Johns
In the event of smoke? It's actually in our dining area to be more precise. But it's by the kitchen. - Louis Gray
How long did you give her to answer the tweet before you called? - Bruce Lewis
There's so much not-buring-the-house-down smoke in the kitchen that most fire peeps recommend NOT putting a smoke detector in the kitchen, exactly because of the false-positive situation you are encountering. - Brian Johns
This wasn't a false positive. My house still smells like smoke. The smoke detector is in the dining area next to the kitchen. You'd approve of its placement, even if not its name. - Louis Gray
Todd Hoff
Quantum Entanglement Drives the Arrow of Time, Scientists Say | Simons Foundation - https://www.simonsfoundation.org/quanta...
"Now, physicists are unmasking a more fundamental source for the arrow of time: Energy disperses and objects equilibrate, they say, because of the way elementary particles become intertwined when they interact — a strange effect called “quantum entanglement.” “Finally, we can understand why a cup of coffee equilibrates in a room,” said Tony Short, a quantum physicist at Bristol. “Entanglement builds up between the state of the coffee cup and the state of the room.”" - Todd Hoff from Bookmarklet
"When two particles interact, they can no longer even be described by their own, independently evolving probabilities, called “pure states.” Instead, they become entangled components of a more complicated probability distribution that describes both particles together. It might dictate, for example, that the particles spin in opposite directions. The system as a whole is in a pure... more... - Todd Hoff
"Using an obscure approach to quantum mechanics that treated units of information as its basic building blocks, Lloyd spent several years studying the evolution of particles in terms of shuffling 1s and 0s. He found that as the particles became increasingly entangled with one another, the information that originally described them (a “1” for clockwise spin and a “0” for... more... - Todd Hoff
Resistance is futile. The collective awaits you. - Jkram|ɯɐɹʞſ from Android
"In the new story of the arrow of time, it is the loss of information through quantum entanglement, rather than a subjective lack of human knowledge, that drives a cup of coffee into equilibrium with the surrounding room. The room eventually equilibrates with the outside environment, and the environment drifts even more slowly toward equilibrium with the rest of the universe. The giants... more... - Todd Hoff
From what I understand from Shannon's formulation of information and entropy, though, maximal entropy *is* maximal information. At maximum entropy, you need to describe the state of every particle in order to describe the state of the system. At minimum entropy, you only need a few bits of information to describe the state of the entire system—if you know the state of a few particles,... more... - Victor Ganata
It seems more like magic to me. - Todd Hoff
Well, Shannon had to have gotten something right, otherwise we wouldn't have zip files, JPEGs, or mp3s :D - Victor Ganata
Thomas Hawk
Flickr 3.0 for Android and iPhone. http://blog.flickr.net/en...
mashable
Today in "survival of the fittest", a centipede clawed its way out of the snake that ate it. http://mashable.com/2014... via @livescience
mashable
30 'Star Wars' Facts You Didn't Know http://mashable.com/2014...
Todd Hoff
Solar’s Insane Cost Drop | CleanTechnica - http://cleantechnica.com/2014...
Solar’s Insane Cost Drop | CleanTechnica
"As you can see, the cost of solar PV has come from – quite literally – off the charts less than a decade ago to a point where Bernstein says solar PV is now cheaper than oil and Asian LNG (liquefied natural gas). It does its calculations on an MMBTU basis. MMBTU is the standard unit of measure for liquid fuels, often referred to as one million British thermal units." - Todd Hoff from Bookmarklet
Mark H
Todd Hoff
Black and White Street Portraits by Then-Unknown Photographer Vivian Maier from the 1950s-60s « The Wall Breakers The Wall Breakers - http://thewallbreakers.com/black-a...
Black and White Street Portraits by Then-Unknown Photographer Vivian Maier from the 1950s-60s « The Wall Breakers The Wall Breakers
Black and White Street Portraits by Then-Unknown Photographer Vivian Maier from the 1950s-60s « The Wall Breakers The Wall Breakers
Black and White Street Portraits by Then-Unknown Photographer Vivian Maier from the 1950s-60s « The Wall Breakers The Wall Breakers
Some great pictures. Being able to find and see these kind of compositions is a real art. - Todd Hoff
She was a great photographer. Last year I bought the book: http://www.amazon.com/Vivian-... - Nils Sandin
The documentary "Finding Vivian Maier" is currently in limited release in the US: http://www.findingvivianmaier.com/see-fil... - Nils Sandin
Nice, thanks Nils - Todd Hoff
mashable
Watch 400 people guess where each U.S. state lives on a map. Warning: Don't get your hopes up. http://mashable.com/2014...
Mark H
Is the mote around the village, or is this a smaller fort/castle thingy? - Eivind
It's more a fortified manor house than a castle. Definitely not a village. The battlements on the tower were only added after seeking permission from the King (I forget which one). From Wikipedia: "Originally dating to around 1320, the building's importance lies in the fact that successive owners effected relatively few changes to the main structure, after the completion of the... more... - Mark H
Sean McBride
Evernote CEO: Apps will become obsolete - Fortune Tech - http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2014...
"Session length shrinks each time we move to a smaller, faster, more convenient computing system. We went from desktop computers to laptops, and then to smartphones and tablets, and now to wearables and connected devices. We use desktop computers, or laptops, for two to three hours, and we use smartphones for two or three minutes at a time, 50 times a day. On computers with long session lengths it makes sense to use powerful software with files and databases. On phones, it makes more sense to use apps for our two-minute interactions." - Sean McBride
"But when we move to wearables, session length will drop from two minutes to two seconds, Libin said. The challenge will be figuring out how to make someone productive for one second at a time, 1,000 times a day. Apps are irrelevant in the world of wearables, because "when any given interaction is a second long, you definitely don't have time to think about apps," Libin said. "It has to be more of a service."" - Sean McBride
I just read something where the average interaction on a phone is 80 seconds. I imagine wearables will be task specific, a combination of context and learning, reactive, so it doesn't mean apps are dead, they will just do what they are good at doing. - Todd Hoff
Perhaps specialized apps will merge seamlessly into AGI (Artificial General Intelligence) distributed throughout every nook and cranny of one's environment (including wearable computers). - Sean McBride
mashable
Watch the Internet try to answer one of geography's most difficult questions: Where is Wyoming on a map? http://mashable.com/2014...
Todd Hoff
The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism - http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-zer...
The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism
"In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism. Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now taking it to its death—the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that drives productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services in order to win over consumers and market share. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs are not counted.) While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring marginal costs to near zero, making goods and services priceless, nearly free, and abundant,... more... - Todd Hoff from Bookmarklet
Not sure if I'll buy this or not. Abundance seems a real possibility with nano manufacturing tech on the horizon, and as Marx noted our social structures mirror our economic structures, so this should be interesting in the large, I just don't see a connection with IoT. I reads too much like "and a miracle will occur." - Todd Hoff
Victor Ganata
What if there really is a Galactic Federation of highly technologically advanced a superhuman/godlike species with a Prime Directive not to interfere with primitives like us? So the reason why we haven't seen any signs of extraterrestrial life is because they're deliberately withholding them from us.
If we manage to get our shit together, they'll offer us membership, but they're betting we'll annihilate ourselves first. - Victor Ganata from iPhone
I am more likely to believe that than there is zero life elsewhere and we're it for the universe. - (Curtis/Alan) Jackson
So this is the naturalistic version of a providential god? - Todd Hoff
I'm betting that there is plenty of other life out there, but 1) lots of worlds will have one celled organisms, or plants, or animals that are in the dinosaur stage for hundreds of millions or years, or 2) there are highly technologically advanced species, but the energy needed to get their physical bodies from one star to another at a speed of like 0.5c or 0.9c is too great. Space is... more... - Joe - Systems Analyst
Sure, interstellar travel is difficult. Although if you think about it, we already possess the technology to send probes to nearby stars—it's not really a technological problem, but a resource allocation and political stability problem. Still, it's very low probability anyone will send a starship, but radio waves are fairly cheap. - Victor Ganata from iPhone
Yeah, communication and radio waves are cheap. We probably just can't listen in to the conversation going since they may be doing communications that seem like static to us, but we don't have the right software to decode that static. I wonder what a digital version of a PDF document sounds like. - Joe - Systems Analyst
In other words, another life form would have a hard time decoding our PDF documents. But, they might be able to figure out our radio and tv signals. - Joe - Systems Analyst
We just watched Contact again recently, so I have been thinking about this kinda stuff. - Joe - Systems Analyst
Reaching the Andromeda Galaxy would take 2,900,000 years. Humans started using fire 80,000 years ago. - Todd Hoff
Yeah, but with currently existing ion propulsion drives, you could actually reach a velocity of 0.3c. http://www.nasa.gov/centers... At that velocity, it would only take about 13 years to get to Alpha Centauri and 20 years to get to Barnard's star (although the lengthy acceleration and deceleration phases would probably add a lot of travel time.) - Victor Ganata
Lets say the round trip to Alpha Centauri is 26 years and ignore the accel/decel phase. One would also need to feed the person for 26 years, and food storage would take a bit of space and weight. By the end of the trip, he or she is going to be very bored of the MREs. - Joe - Systems Analyst
I doubt we'd send people. I bet no one in the galaxy sends people. They just send robotic probes that will send zettabytes of data back to the homeworld and if anyone really wants to visit distant planets and colonize them in the flesh, they just load up the data in their holodeck and play SimTerraformer. - Victor Ganata
We will probably turn into robot/cyborgs anyway to extend our life spans. Then, human life forms will essentially merge with the robotic probes. No more meat space for us. - Joe - Systems Analyst
Yeah, I could see cyborg starships. A definite one-way trip in more ways than one. - Victor Ganata
mashable
Hacker Weev Gets Sentence Thrown Out - http://mashable.com/2014...
Victor Ganata
It occurs to me that "The Princess Bride" could totally take place in Westeros. Maybe there's not enough nudity and whoring, but there's certainly plenty of treachery, scheming, plotting, torturing, and running people through with swords.
Sounds like you have your next crossover fanfiction idea. :) - Rachel Walden
A little too much whimsy for Westeros. - Todd Hoff
You'd really just need to put off-screen events on screen: like all the other trumped-up wars that Humperdinck has probably started, all the crimes Vizzini, Iñigo, and Fezzik had to commit to pay the bills before they got the job from Humperdinck, all the people Wesley probably robbed and murdered as a dread pirate, all the people that Count Rugen arbitrarily tortured and/or slaughtered, that sort of thing. And I actually think there's a lot of whimsy in Westeros :D - Victor Ganata
I mean, Count Rugen kind of strikes me as a cross between Tywin Lannister and the Bastard of Bolton, to be honest :D - Victor Ganata
The novel version of *The Princess Bride" actually goes a little more into detail about the torture and other perversions that Humperdinck and Rugen are into. - Victor Ganata
Heh, according to William Goldman's framework conceit about *The Princess Bride* being an abridged story, the fictitious original text by S. Morgenstern is supposed to be primarily about the excesses of nobility. So one can imagine Goldman just cleaning up all the sexual perversion and whoring and all the torture and murder not relevant to the main plot to make it PG-13 :D - Victor Ganata
Victor Ganata
Hmm. I'm thinking those protesters are more "anti-gentrification" than "anti-tech".
Yep every time I see them described as anti-tech, I cringe. They use Twitter & Reddit to organize, ffs! - Starmama from FFHound(roid)!
Perhaps more anti new aristocracy? - Todd Hoff
That is kind where anti-gentrification comes from, etymologically speaking. :D - Victor Ganata
Jim Goldstein
Has a solar eclipse ever been seen from the Moon? http://spacefellowship.com/news...
Robert Scoble
My first video off of the new DJI drone: http://www.youtube.com/watch... WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW. I can not overhype this enough. Wow.
My first video off of the new DJI drone: http://t.co/zH6kq2lg2m WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW WOW. I can not overhype this enough. Wow.
Play
Wow. If Robert can't, then who can? - Professor A.I.
mashable
If social networks were 'Game of Thrones' houses, this is how they'd look: http://mashable.com/2014... https://twitter.com/mashabl...
Mark H
Thomas Hawk
I don't like that you can't select the text of tags on the new @flickr photo page.
Thomas Hawk
I don't like that if you click on someone who's faved your photo on the new @flickr photo page it takes you to favs instead of their photos
Todd Hoff
If Walmart Paid Its Employees a Living Wage, How Much Would Prices Go Up? - YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch...!
The answer is 1.4%. Or a penny per box of mac and cheese. - Todd Hoff from Bookmarklet
When the $15/hour protests started in McDonalds, it was reported that the price of just the Big Mac woiuld only have to go up something like 35-40 cents to make up the difference...such a little cost that would make a huge difference. - Chris Topher
mashable
"Colbert would leave behind the pseudo-conservative persona he's cultivated at The Colbert Report..." http://mashable.com/2014... #LateNight
Mark H
Portsmouth's proud history makes it the perfect place for a weekend break - http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifesty...
Portsmouth's proud history makes it the perfect place for a weekend break
"Old Portsmouth is also known as Spice Island because of its historical links with the spice trade and was once a magnet for sailors on shore leave. I enjoyed a drink on the patio of the Spice Island Inn overlooking the harbour – it’s certainly novel to have a glass of wine while listening to the safety ­announcements on the Isle of Wight ferry. This was a perfect spot to end a weekend in this nautical Hampshire city. Portsmouth may be losing the dockyards, but hopefully it will thrive as it’s a great place to visit. As Nelson famously said: England Expects. Luckily, Portsmouth delivers." - Mark H from Bookmarklet
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